The Freelancer School Podcast https://freelancermasterclass.com Mike Volkin and the team at Freelancer Masterclass delivers quick and ACTIONABLE lessons that freelancers can learn to grow their careers. Whether your new to freelancing or are a seasoned veteran, learn the latest freelancing tips that will skyrocket your sucess. Tue, 07 Jul 2020 19:28:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 Mike Volkin and the team at Freelancer Masterclass delivers quick and ACTIONABLE lessons that freelancers can learn to grow their careers. Whether your new to freelancing or are a seasoned veteran, learn the latest freelancing tips that will skyrocket your success. Mike Volkin clean episodic Mike Volkin mikevolkin2@gmail.com mikevolkin2@gmail.com (Mike Volkin) Freelancer School The Freelancer School Podcast https://freelancermasterclass.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/podcast-cover.jpg https://freelancermasterclass.com Santa Rosa, California Weekly How to find clients online and offline https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-clients-online-and-offline/ Tue, 18 Feb 2020 16:48:03 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=9034 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-clients-online-and-offline/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-clients-online-and-offline/feed/ 0 Often, freelancers find that finding clients online and offline are the hardest part of the job. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In this episode, Mike Volkin shows you some tips on how to find clients online and offline. — Raw Transcript: Hey guys, Mike Volkin here with Freelancer masterclass, and freelancers school, …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-clients-online-and-offline/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to find clients online and offline</span> Read More »</a></p> Often, freelancers find that finding clients online and offline are the hardest part of the job. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In this episode, Mike Volkin shows you some tips on how to find clients online and offline.


Raw Transcript:

Hey guys, Mike Volkin here with Freelancer masterclass, and freelancers school, the podcast. But if you haven’t already subscribed to our YouTube channel, please go ahead and do that since we produce a lot of good visual content that the ideas for this content comes from you much like this piece of content. So be sure to go ahead and subscribe to our YouTube channel. This piece of content is titled How to find clients online. And offline. Many of you have come to me and said, Mike, you talked a lot about how to find clients online, but there’s a whole world out there offline. So how do you find clients? So let me go ahead and explain to you first the online portion and then I’ll go through the offline portion and We’re talking in general terms here for this piece of content. So if you find, you want to deep dive into one of these aspects, and I’m talking about Freelancer masterclass, discusses all of these. So the first thing the most obvious is freelancing platforms to find clients online, right? So you have no less than a dozen, if not five dozen different freelancing platforms, depending on what industry you’re in the big 800 pound gorilla in the room is Upwork. Right? So go ahead and set yourself up with a profile. And I’ll look for jobs on Upwork. And maybe even sometimes they’ll come to you. Another one is social networking sites. Now many of you think Well, I know how to use social networking sites for myself, but doesn’t really work for my business. Well think again, I get a lot of jobs off LinkedIn, you have to build your network. It’s kind of like I described it as like a rolling snowball downhill you might, you know, do a lot of work to get that snowball formed at first and it won’t really seem like anything. But as you roll the snowball downhill, picks up steam on its own. So you need to build yourself up and network I have over 5000 People on my LinkedIn network. So whenever I post something, a lot of people see it. At first, it’s going to seem like you’re shouting in an empty room or posting something in an empty room. And that is true, you will, nobody will see it. But as you start gaining followers, and they will come organically, but you can also proactively reach out to get people to follow you back. But that will work for you in your favor. And you’ll have a large audience, just imagine if you, you build up your social networks to 50,000 relevant people, every time you post something 10s of thousands of people will still see your post. So it does work. It just it’s not immediate. job listing sites is another one, right? So we work remotely Angel list remote co there’s a lot of sites out there that post only Remote Jobs. Now you might be thinking, Mike, these are full time jobs. Maybe Maybe not. You know, I found a lot of jobs actually at least a dozen over many years of freelancing that you know, somebody would post something on we work remotely saying we need a marketing leader right? And I could tell them you know what, I’m a freelancer and then I go into all the benefits of hiring a freelancer you know, you have no none of the employee costs and all that good stuff that goes with freelancing and then you you start a dialogue with them and then they realize Wait a second, we can hire somebody remotely and get all these benefits and we can widen our our talent pool we don’t have to look for somebody just in this small little area that we’re in we can we have a whole world at our at our fingertips and then you start a dialogue with them and they wind up wind up hiring you and Craigslist is one to you might say why do you leave Craigslist off of this it Craigslist is okay as you know it’s it has a record of not being it as a traffic but it there’s no technology there. So it’s very hard to keep up with what’s available on Craigslist have to constantly check it right. direct response funnels. Now you might not know what a direct response funnel is, but let me explain it to you. In its most simplest terms, it’s a paid ad to a landing page to lead so just really quick you You have a landing page. That is basically just a one page website that could be tied to your main site or it’s not. But the purpose of landing page is to solve one specific problem. So you have a solution out there to a problem that a prospect or a client has right. That landing page talks about that one particular solution. Now, the paid ads that you run on Google or Facebook, talks about the problem and shows a solution. So the solution will be the landing page like for example, if a client needs more organic reach on on Google, your solution might be that you can provide this special SEO package for them right search engine optimization package, the paid ads will say I have this new or unique way to drive organic traffic so you’re speaking their language. It’s going to a landing page that shows you have the solution. And then you have the lead so paid ads and landing page lead. I’ve gotten a lot of very high ticket clients off creating these landing pages. So I have these various solutions I offer I stick up these paid ads Yeah, you’re paying for the ad, but over time and might even be very quick even the first month you will learn that putting in one marketing dollar into paid ads equals 10 or more revenue, x 10 x and revenue and return so I gave this example of how I spent a couple thousand on on some paid ads recently for some insurance solution I was providing to insurance reps and I was driving a high ticket

landing page the people were registering for $10,000 solutions to my problem I was driving driving this particular solution and people were registering I had multiple registrants for 10,070 $500 coming in during my that 120 20 $500 paid ads campaign so I had a huge return on my investment and you can do the same to the more targeted your your solution is and the better your ads are, the better the whole funnel will work. Okay, so really look into direct response from And we talked about that at Freelancer masterclass. So, affiliate programs you might want to set up there’s a lot of different ways to do this, but commission junction is is common and shareasale whatnot but you might want to set up productization of your service and then get other affiliates out there to get a percentage of of their sales. So they will advertise for you for 10% or 50% of whatever business they bring in. So you have like a free workforce out there that only works under certain circumstances. So if you can productize your business, that’s when it works the best in the last major way that I can tell you in this quick video to get clients online is cold emails. You know, it’s it’s tough to say you’re spamming people or it doesn’t necessarily mean you have to buy a list but cold emailing people so you can connect with people on LinkedIn, and then send them a message introducing yourself. I wouldn’t recommend trying to sell them all in one email. But people do that to me every single day on LinkedIn and other social networks. Working sites. It doesn’t work but that much to people like me who is used to it. But if you were to reach out to someone in an effective way, with a solution to their problem, and it just it hits them right at the right time, it does work. I have gotten business off cold emails before. I don’t necessarily do it now anymore, but it does work and some people make their living off it. Now let’s go to offline work. All right. A lot of a lot of freelancers are introverts. I am an introvert, believe it or not, I don’t like to do offline networking. It’s preferred I do online. But if you are that type of person that likes to do offline networking. Some of these may resonate with you very well. Your personal network. I personally don’t do friends and family. I don’t work with them anymore. I used to, but a lot of people make a good living networking with their personal network. All right, and I talked about how to go about that and Freelancer masterclass. So, it goes beyond the scope of this video, but just know that you have a huge network you should be able to in your network. Even if you don’t know that many people you should be able to get at least Two clients a month often, okay, events, attendance, or a booth so you can attend events that are targeted towards either advancing your own career or the services you provide. So if you provide a writing service, you can go to a local writing event or local marketing communications event where people your prospects will be there, you can get a booth to showcase your services, I would only recommend doing that if it’s cost effective and you have a good solution you’re not just quote unquote a blog writer, you’ve you’ve actually found a niche that people can enjoy hiring you for. I’ve seen too many generalistic booths that like they’re so forgettable it’s it’s expensive to get a booth so if if you’re unique and you found a niche, then go ahead and and get a booth that might serve you well. Another one is speaking events. Okay, so I love to speak. I’m going to be starting a speaking push here. It’s the end of the year I like to make I like to get my tour in advance for so I’m making it now. Being in the fourth quarter and making it now for next year. So if you like to be in onstage and give talks about what you know, if you have a teaching fetish you like to go out there and teach people, maybe starting a speaking tour is right for you. Sometimes the speeches you give are free, but they provide good leads, and sometimes they pay you thousands of dollars to speak. So it could be a good, I know people that speak full time. And that’s all they do is speak. So if that’s you, then go ahead and get good at speaking and start a tour. strategic partnerships. So there are companies out there and there are other freelancers out there that have the same client tells you but offer different services. So for example, those that need SEO, Search Engine Optimization services also usually need website websites built or websites redone. So that would be a strategic partnership if you are someone who builds websites to go reach out to SEO companies and vice versa. So think about some kind of strategic partnerships, those that hold the same clientele as you but don’t necessarily offer the same services.

Getting partnerships in niche magazines and newspapers. You know, we’re talking about earned media. And let me just combine that also with haro. Help a reporter out is actually a website, but you can get offline work from it. So this the the getting published in the niche magazines and haro all comes into kind of like the same realm here is earned media, right? So you want to put yourself out there as a expert. And whenever a reporter who’s always looking for experts needs to quote you or need to do a magazine article or a newspaper article on that industry that you’re an expert of, they’re going to come to you. And so there’s competitors out there for haro but you can find them online, just type in earned media and then your industry in each building to find something similar. And then host a workshop, you know, I do this sometimes. And I’m actually going to be starting to do this. It next year is going to be a large part of my marketing push is I’m going to be working with small, small and medium sized businesses, helping their marketing leaders become more efficient and more effective. So I’m hoping a workshop on that it’s gonna be a three day workshop, you can do the same too. So go to small businesses in your in your area or any area, make an appearance. Make it like a three day or even a one day or seven day workshop, bring in employees of that business and charge for it. And you can even make it free. I mean, I’m sure you’ve all heard those radio ads and people that teach you how to flip houses, right? They’re all over the place. It’s a free workshop, maybe even provide a lunch for you. Or they might charge a nominal fee like 20 bucks you go and attend. Now they’re hoping to get more money from you. Of course that’s the reason why they’re flying a whole staff of people to your area. They fill up a room of 200 people hoping that 10 of those people or 20 of those people will buy a $20,000 more detailed course on it right but they’ll give you just a little taste right you can do something similar. Or you can do cold calling something that a lot of people just hate nowadays but it is effective if you call people and know who you’re calling right if you if the decision maker for your particular services, the HR manager or You’re the CEO you got to call those people set up an appointment, ask them to go out to lunch or or give them a you know a link to a webinar or something like that. And then cold calling can work if you’re effective at it and you like doing it. So, hope this helps you bring in some new clients.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

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Often, freelancers find that finding clients online and offline are the hardest part of the job. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In this episode, Mike Volkin shows you some tips on how to find clients online and offline. Often, freelancers find that finding clients online and offline are the hardest part of the job. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In this episode, Mike Volkin shows you some tips on how to find clients online and offline. — Raw Transcript: Hey guys, Mike Volkin here with Freelancer masterclass, and freelancers school, … How to find clients online and offline Read More » Mike Volkin 12:35
What do most people not know about working as a freelancer? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-most-people-not-know-about-working-as-a-freelancer/ Tue, 04 Feb 2020 14:00:50 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=8554 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-most-people-not-know-about-working-as-a-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-most-people-not-know-about-working-as-a-freelancer/feed/ 0 Show notes: So shat do most people not know about working as a freelancer? Freelancing sounds like a fancy job, but sometimes it’s not, here’s why: Inconsistent income No benefits Isolation It’s a dog eat dog world Self-motivation is important Separating work from home life is important Finding clients suck, to some people The hours …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-most-people-not-know-about-working-as-a-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What do most people not know about working as a freelancer?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show notes:

So shat do most people not know about working as a freelancer?

Freelancing sounds like a fancy job, but sometimes it’s not, here’s why:

  • Inconsistent income
  • No benefits
  • Isolation
  • It’s a dog eat dog world
  • Self-motivation is important
  • Separating work from home life is important
  • Finding clients suck, to some people
  • The hours takes some getting used to

Raw transcript:

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microfocus

and welcome yet again everybody to freelancers school. I am Mike V. And today’s topic we’re going to be discussing, what do most people not know about working as a freelancer? Okay, many people ask me this because they don’t know what a freelancer is. They might have worked for themselves, they might have owned a service-based business or invented a product and been an entrepreneur that way. But freelancers are a little bit different of a breed and I want to talk to you about some of the hidden benefits and drawbacks of being a freelancer mostly drawbacks because in my other videos and podcasts, you’ve heard me talk so much about the benefits and I don’t

need to repeat them here. But this podcast will focus more on the negatives. And the first thing I want to mention is freelancing looks fancy. And in some respects, it is there’s a lot of really great benefits you could never get from a “salary job”. But nonetheless, the first item on my list here is inconsistent income. All right, this is probably the most obvious but as a freelancer, your work ebbs and flows. Now, in some months, you do way better than you can ever do at a salary job. But on some months, you know, maybe even sometimes seasonally, if you’re in one of those industries, where a lot of your clients don’t really hire for a particular season, then they might seem drier than normal. Another item is there are no benefits. Well, if there are you’d have to pay for them yourself. Health Benefits are important. And luckily if you have a spouse that already has benefits to an employer, you can just get that but if both of you are self-employed, then you’ll have to seek benefits on your own.

I’ve outlined in a few blog articles of mine and my youtube channel on how to get your own benefits that really are cost-effective. So look into that. Another item on my list is isolation. You know, I mean, here’s an example of me sitting in my home office. And I’ve barely talked to people at all today. So sometimes it might get lonely. And if that’s the case, then go to a coffee shop and work from there. I know a lot of people who work at coffee shops or I know a lot of freelancers who do and they work at a co-working location. So if isolation is an issue for you, you can just work in a co-work location, and there are a lot of them throughout the United States is actually quite cost-effective and you get to see and work with other self-employed people. Another one I have on my list here is it’s really a dog-eat-dog world out there. There’s a lot of freelancers and freelancing is a growing industry because everybody wants to be a freelancer or it seems like everybody does. So there’s a lot of competition. There’s a lot of unscrupulous people who freelances who will promise

The world to clients at a crazy price. And unfortunately, usually, clients learn their lesson and wind up hiring as good ones. I refuse at this point in my career to work with someone that I had originally a prospect call with. And then they went to someone else that was cheaper, and then came back to me to fix their issues. It happens all the time. I’m saying at least twice a month, I get somebody who had a prospect call with a disappear that didn’t return my follow up emails. And it turns out that they weren’t hiring somebody else they interviewed for like half the price and they did a crummy job and promised the world that they didn’t get, I absolutely refuse to work with them. I used to accept contracts like that and it turned out to be a nightmare. Those types of clients will nickel and dime you and they’re already on their high guard at being defensive because of this previous Freelancer or freelancers and what they’ve done to that particular person or client so they are pretty much tainted at that point. And I know from experience of stay away from that plus is a

A little bit of a pride thing in there, I gave them my best effort, I spent time with them, I understood their issue, and I presented them with the best solution, then they go and hire somebody else for cheaper. I’ve even had, on several occasions, people who have come and taken my quote and given it to other freelancers to try to beat it thinking that the this new Freelancer can do the same quality work that I can, which is obviously not, not right. So I refuse to work with them. But yeah, the competition is fierce and you have to really niche down and find your brand and find out why exactly you’re a freelancer and what you’re passionate about, and you won’t have to worry about competition if you do that properly. Self-motivation is also very important as if, as a freelancer, most people don’t know that working as a freelancer. You have to be motivated. I know of a freelancer who just likes to sleep in late, doesn’t like to is not very proactive. Let’s put it that way. doesn’t like to get client work done when the client is working. So if they’re working like a client’s working like a nine to five job, they’ll specifically work from 5pm

Just so they don’t have to communicate in this person is a computer programmer. So he goes out of the way not to communicate with people. If that is the case, then maybe freelancing isn’t right for you, but you have to be self-motivated. Okay? So you have to be able to be proactive, communicate with your client, and get the work done on time when you promised.

as a freelancer, separating work from home life is also important. You know, I mean, I work out of my house right now I have a newborn couple doors down for me here in my house, I can hear her

laughing sometimes crying, I just want to be with her but you sometimes you just have to be able to understand that your time is money as a freelancer and every billable hour counts. So you have to separate your work from your home life and be disciplined with that. Okay. I have a sign on my door that says when my door shut please don’t bother me only text me that prevents people visitors in my house. My family members coming in knocking on my door. Heck, maybe even when I’m shooting a podcast people knock on my door.

I’d have to, you know, stop and start the whole thing over again. All right. So you have to have rules like that in your house so people know when you’re available. And then, you know, being a freelancer, a lot of people don’t realize finding clients kind of suck to some people. I like it, I could talk to freelancers all day long. I talked to entrepreneurs all day long. That’s my favorite part of being a freelancer is figuring out what the client’s needs are and being able to help them out. Other than the results, that’s my favorite part. So but in most cases, if you’re a writer, designer, and you don’t know much about selling or marketing, then that might be a very big sticking point for you. So finding clients is something you all you actually have to do. And then most people don’t like doing it. So there’s a crossroads there. Right.

The last point I want to mention is that the hours take some getting used to as a freelancer, many people don’t think it’s not just eight to five, as a freelance or nine to five, whatever the mantra is, right? It’s it’s whenever

You can work whenever you need to work while maintaining a work-life balance. Okay, so if it’s Saturday morning in my client calls and there’s an issue, or maybe it’s Saturday morning and I didn’t get enough work done on Thursday and Friday and have some emails to respond to or afford to put out Yeah, I’m going to work on Saturday just like it’s Tuesday afternoon, okay, so the hours in the day really don’t matter. It’s just a matter of getting the client work done and getting your prospecting done. So you can line up work for the next month, next week, next year, whatever the case so I hope that sheds some light on what most people do not know about working as a freelancer Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancer school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

 

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Show notes: So shat do most people not know about working as a freelancer? Freelancing sounds like a fancy job, but sometimes it’s not, here’s why: Inconsistent income No benefits Isolation It’s a dog eat dog world Self-motivation is important Separati... Show notes: So shat do most people not know about working as a freelancer? Freelancing sounds like a fancy job, but sometimes it’s not, here’s why: Inconsistent income No benefits Isolation It’s a dog eat dog world Self-motivation is important Separating work from home life is important Finding clients suck, to some people The hours … What do most people not know about working as a freelancer? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:56
What are the Best Freelance Marketing Tips? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-the-best-freelance-marketing-tips/ Tue, 28 Jan 2020 16:31:58 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=8350 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-the-best-freelance-marketing-tips/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-the-best-freelance-marketing-tips/feed/ 0 In today’s episode, I discuss the best freelance marketing tips you can do to get noticed by prospects and build your personal brand. Be sure to take notes for this episode!   Raw Transcript: Hi, everyone, Mike Volkin. Here, I wanted to give you some of the best freelance marketing tips for those of you …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-the-best-freelance-marketing-tips/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What are the Best Freelance Marketing Tips?</span> Read More »</a></p> In today’s episode, I discuss the best freelance marketing tips you can do to get noticed by prospects and build your personal brand. Be sure to take notes for this episode!

 

Raw Transcript:

Hi, everyone, Mike Volkin. Here, I wanted to give you some of the best freelance marketing tips for those of you that just don’t do any marketing and have gotten worried a little bit, that maybe just relying on client referrals won’t get you by as a freelance marketer. So let me just highlight some of the things that you can do to kind of get you unstuck and outside of your comfort zone. To get you noticed more, the first thing I want you to do is I want you to pick a channel, okay? Don’t try to do too many things at once. Just pick your most comfortable marketing channel and go after it. So you might be asking Mike, what is a comfortable marketing channel? I don’t even know what that is. Well, do you like LinkedIn or possibly even another social network? Do you like sending personal emails? Do you like going to events and seminars, those are all channels that you can market yourself and don’t think of it as you just selling yourself and handing out business cards. You know, it’s, it’s just about relationships and connections. The freelancing world is all about that connection.
Okay, so pick a channel and go after it and then once you master it and go on to another one, it’s rare that even I someone who’s been freelancing for well over a decade will do more than two marketing channels at once. I usually just stay focused on one and sometimes I’ll even pick another one that kind of complements the one that I’m working on but the freelancer to try to do too much at once are deluding themselves. They pick one and get really good at it, and then go after another one. Or just stay with that one. If you’re good at it. I know someone who’s built a multimillion-dollar agency, a marketing agency after he was a successful Freelancer on just one type of marketing platform. He is a speaker at seminars before he was just networking at seminars and he made the right connections. Somebody asked him to give a talk. Then somebody else asked him to give a talk and now everybody’s asked him give a talk and now that’s how he makes his money and he makes a lot of money doing it well into seven figures if not eight.
commit some time in your calendar. Okay, put time on your calendar specific tomorrow.
If you don’t do it, it doesn’t get done. Think of it, like going to the gym. When you get a gym membership. You know, did you know this that most gyms realize that 70% of their
members won’t come regularly, they sign up and they leave within a year. That’s why they try to push you on the yearly memberships because they bank on the fact that you won’t be coming in it more than every once every three weeks if that at all. But I’ll tell you that the best thing you can do for the gym is put time in your calendar to work out because there’s always something that will take precedence over working out right especially if you don’t like working out. Same with dieting, right? There’s always something in the cupboard that’s more beneficial or tasty to eat than then celery and carrots. Right. Same with marketing. If you’re not into marketing, then you won’t do it unless it’s on your calendar. So live and die by your calendar. Put time in your calendar every single day to do some marketing. And just remember your best source for work is client referrals. That’s right, you can make an entire career on a client referral
But the problem with client referrals is it doesn’t come consistently and regularly. I’m at the point in my career where I can get client referrals, but I still do marketing. So the reason why that is because when I do marketing I know that if I hit X amount of people
during an X amount of time I’m going to get x amount of leads and X amount of leads can turn into X amount of prospects or clients. So I know that math that that those numbers those down the funnel, and you will too as an even if it’s not as formal as me where you’re writing them down every month or you say, Okay, I need to hit 50 people today. That means they’ll get to two more contracts, but in a week, you can you’ll just know instinctively at after a while that
if you do certain amount of marketing activities and you will get X amount of clients that month or that week. But client referrals is the easiest way to get people who like us. All you do is simply ask, Hey, you know, I haven’t a Mr. Smith. I haven’t talked to you in a couple months. Wondering if you had anybody that needed any search engine optimization search
services,
I have an extra slot open this month or I just got finished working with a large client have some extra hours. If you know of anybody that can benefit from the same services I provide for you, please go ahead and
send them my way, I’d be happy to pay you a little bit for your time. You know, for any new business I get coming in, however you want to word it is lots of ways to work.
So go ahead and tap your existing network of past clients if you have some for referrals.
Something else you could do is just make sure to automate because if you spend too long doing all this manual work, you won’t actually get very much done because there’s a lot to do. So automate as much as you can, especially for follow up work. You know, a lot of freelancers don’t have newsletters at all. I have one, it goes out twice a month, and it’s just an update of my content. It’s all an RSS feed. I put out content like this. And it goes out to all my clients are my prospects and they just see me as providing value to them and their business.
So use tools like MailChimp, and Active Campaign or HubSpot, I’m super familiar with all of them. And all you really have to do is set up a newsletter with an RSS feed and just be sure to create content. You know, just talk about your expertise. I talked about becoming a, I talked about becoming a great freelancer. And for my entrepreneurs, coaching, I talked about becoming a better entrepreneur. Whole bunch of different stuff you can do but with an RSS feed is pretty much automated. As soon as you populate YouTube as soon as you populate Twitter as soon as you populate Facebook or any other tool, the RSS feed, pulls into your newsletter and then you just click that send button and get a whole fresh new newsletter with all new content. It seems like you took hours to do it and it really just you did nothing besides click the Send button. Okay. Here’s a really good marketing tip that a lot of people aren’t utilizing, especially freelancers, and that’s making a paid YouTube video. Okay, they work make a YouTube video showcasing a specific way you can help a client This is not a sales video. This is like something let’s say you’re an SEO expert.
You make a video on Hey, let me just tell you about this new SEO technique that, you know, Google just updated their algorithm and I just did this for a client and it increased their search engine availability 38% in the last month, let me show you what I did. And then you walk them through the process and four or five minutes you show them what you did you say, hey, if you want me to do this for you, give me a call. And then it’s let’s say you’re targeting that particular video was talking about a client you worked with that was a small business between one and 10 employees that makes less than a million a year and they live in Columbus, Ohio or something. And now you’re targeting Columbus Ohio companies with less than 10 employees and you can in a certain industry you can target as almost as specific as you want. You can target on on specific channels if you have a competitor you want to be on their channel or something but it’s a very cheap way to drive targeted traffic. A lot of times freelancers try to advertise on Google, and it’s super expensive. It’s I was just paying last month I paid 12 and a half dollars for some clicks for a camp.
I was running. It’s crazy. That same campaign I was running on YouTube, which is owned by Google was like 48 cents a click, it gets because there’s nobody doing stuff on YouTube right now. So it’s like, all this traffic is the second largest search engine in the world, and very few people compared to Google are advertising on it. So there’s a real opportunity for you to make a quick paid YouTube video. How do you make YouTube videos? Well, you have a phone, you can make one on your phone. Do you have something like this a free tool loom calm, which I’m using right now to film this video that you know that’s coming straight from the webcam, Hulu, and then you got a presentation on the screen just talking your way through it. That’s a YouTube ad right there. Okay, so go ahead and utilize it spend a couple hundred bucks Don’t be afraid at the very least you don’t get any prospects. You’ll get some good data on what people are clicking on and what they’re not. Okay. By the way on my first YouTube paid YouTube campaign ever did, I brought into $6,000 contracts. One was 50 801 was like 6800. But I was offering something very specific to ensure
salesman’s insurance reps. Okay, I just thought of this idea that I could offer and I did it I just explained this what I can do for you as an insurance rep and I just targeted some insurance reps and I spent a couple hundred dollars on our brought in like 60 $800 or some crazy number return on investment was huge. Okay.
upsell your past and current clients with more offerings. Alright, so again, reaching back out not just asking for referrals but saying hey, listen, I know I did this SEO project for you. How about I do this local listing projects or citation building project whatever is an upsell for SEO companies or SEO freelancers. You can say hey, listen, I know you utilize me before to do this project. But did you also know I can help you with your benefit with your company that will benefit doing this, you know, just tell them something? Maybe they didn’t hire you for all of your skill sets. Go back to them think about every single client you work with and how else you can help them. Okay, so I hope this helps a lot. Good luck out there.

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In today’s episode, I discuss the best freelance marketing tips you can do to get noticed by prospects and build your personal brand. Be sure to take notes for this episode!   Raw Transcript: Hi, everyone, Mike Volkin. Here, In today’s episode, I discuss the best freelance marketing tips you can do to get noticed by prospects and build your personal brand. Be sure to take notes for this episode!   Raw Transcript: Hi, everyone, Mike Volkin. Here, I wanted to give you some of the best freelance marketing tips for those of you … What are the Best Freelance Marketing Tips? Read More » Mike Volkin 8:59
Should You Work With Overseas Companies https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-you-work-with-overseas-companies/ Tue, 14 Jan 2020 19:56:47 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=7904 https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-you-work-with-overseas-companies/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-you-work-with-overseas-companies/feed/ 0 As a freelancer, working with overseas companies has its benefits and drawbacks. In today’s podcast, we are going to discuss those benefits and drawbacks. Learn how to take advantage of the benefits and mitigate the drawbacks.   Raw Transcript: Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-you-work-with-overseas-companies/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Should You Work With Overseas Companies</span> Read More »</a></p> As a freelancer, working with overseas companies has its benefits and drawbacks. In today’s podcast, we are going to discuss those benefits and drawbacks. Learn how to take advantage of the benefits and mitigate the drawbacks.

 

Raw Transcript:

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by freelancermasterclass.com. You’re listening to freelancing school

Yeah, thank you for joining me for another episode of freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin. And today’s topic I want to discuss with you the pros and cons of working with overseas companies. You know, it’s very common for a company to hire overseas freelancers, usually because of the economies of scale. So if you’re in the US, you like to hire people in India or Romania or Bangladesh or Pakistan, countries where people will work for pennies on the dollar, because the US dollar is strong there. But on the reverse side of that you as a freelancer should you work for companies that are overseas and let me tell you out of the few

clients that I have had that have given me troubles from either a communication standpoint or from a payment standpoint, have most of them have been overseas. Now, I’m not going to say not to work with overseas companies, but I want you to be aware of some of the precautions in doing so. First of all, there’s always a timezone difference you have to be aware of right? So in your work day if it starts at eight or 9am. And you will wake up with several emails from the client needing an immediate update because their night is your day or your day is their night and vice versa. Now, usually, when you’re working with overseas companies, and even overseas freelancers, you get to exchange maybe one or two emails for the day. And that’s it as opposed to someone in or near your timezone where you can exchange multiple emails if need be. And the same thing goes with phone calls. The other thing is communication preferences. Obviously, texting somebody in another country could be quite difficult and expensive unless you have the proper cell phone plan. So usually, you would have to communicate on Google Hangouts or Skype or

Zoom or some other way that is a little less desirable if your mobile, so you have to consider that as well. So if you like to talk to clients or even do work Moberly, you’re going to have the option of using Skype via mobile, you might have to connect with them on, you know, Dropbox or something and send them a file on your phone or Google Drive, which is always just that much more difficult on your phone than it is on your desktop. So usually, if you’re communicating with these clients, outside of your normal workday, you’re going to be doing stuff where you’re not in front of your computer, right? So you have to consider that. And the big thing you should be considering is payments. So I had a client, and I won’t say the name of the company, but it was a translation services company. Now what this company did, they had it because their translation services, they had employees and contractors all over the world. And so I was constantly being pinged by their managers all over the world for various things. And I had one HR rep I had to submit my timesheet to and then somebody else in another country

Submit the payment. Now when things went south, and our communication started to break down, and they decided they didn’t want to pay Now, normally in the US, if they’re in your country, not just in the US, if you’re listening to this many other country, if you’re working with a client within your country, it’s a lot easier for restitution to get payment, right. So you just bring in the small claims court or some other type of court, depending on the size of a payment, maybe even arbitration. And if need be, you go to court and you get your money back. Now, with a particular company that’s overseas, you’re going to have a lot more barriers to be able to recover your money. It’s not even worth it unless you have at least 30 40,000 years to recover. So you have to keep that in mind as well. So there are a lot of precautions working with overseas companies, and I hope you take these tips and think about them the next time you get a potential prospect that wants to talk to you overseas.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school.

Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancermasterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

 

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As a freelancer, working with overseas companies has its benefits and drawbacks. In today’s podcast, we are going to discuss those benefits and drawbacks. Learn how to take advantage of the benefits and mitigate the drawbacks. As a freelancer, working with overseas companies has its benefits and drawbacks. In today’s podcast, we are going to discuss those benefits and drawbacks. Learn how to take advantage of the benefits and mitigate the drawbacks.   Raw Transcript: Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to … Should You Work With Overseas Companies Read More » Mike Volkin 4:16
An interview with new freelancer Michael Hill https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-new-freelancer-michael-hill/ Tue, 07 Jan 2020 15:43:46 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=7596 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-new-freelancer-michael-hill/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-new-freelancer-michael-hill/feed/ 0 Want to know what it’s like as a new freelancer? In this podcast, I interview Michael Hill who went through Freelancer Masterclass and is now on his own getting contracts from clients   RAW TRANSCRIPT:   Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-new-freelancer-michael-hill/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with new freelancer Michael Hill</span> Read More »</a></p> Want to know what it’s like as a new freelancer? In this podcast, I interview Michael Hill who went through Freelancer Masterclass and is now on his own getting contracts from clients

 

RAW TRANSCRIPT:

 

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass.

All right everybody. Welcome to another Freelancer school. I am Mike Bolton lead instructor Freelancer masterclass. And today we have a  special guest, Michael Hill, one of the first students to ever go through Freelancer masterclass. And now he is well on his way to being a very busy freelancer. So I thought I’d have him on today to talk a little bit about the trials and the tribulations of when he decided to join Freelancer masterclass what he got out of it. But don’t mistake this for just a commercial for the masterclass This is for you guys to understand what a beginning Freelancer does what they struggle with. Maybe you identify with some of the things Michael is going to say. And then yeah, we’ll just let the conversation go from there Michael. Welcome to the

Hey, Mike, thanks so much for having me. Now your specialty is marketing, right? Yeah, marketing, just general marketing kind of

starting out, I started out with like doing some SEO, writing some blog articles, and then starting to do email marketing and get into paid ads as well. So you’re kind of trying to find your niche trying to find your what’s what’s making you happy, what really drives your interest, right?

Pretty much because, you know, something like, that was brought to my attention was just like, marketing is such a wide umbrella. So I can’t like be really good at marketing in general. You know, like, I gotta, I gotta really like specialize. So

started with like blog writing, just understand SCV basic like SEO, writing a blog, what that looks like, and then trying to get into more aspects of SEO and then

you know,

Client needed email marketing so started doing that and I really enjoyed that. So that’s kind of

where I’m at right now. Sure. Yeah, let’s just take a step back for what before we even met before even found out about Freelancer masterclass what made you decide to want to be a freelance in the first place?

So what I was doing was I was like teaching guitar. I actually graduated in May, this may here. Congrats. Thanks. So, you know, with that I was kind of like just trying differently. Like little jobs. I worked at a restaurant for a little bit and then I was like teaching guitar and that was cool and all but I think when I started thinking more about goals and trying to be like more specific about it, it just isn’t, doesn’t fit into like the bigger picture. You know, so like, I was thinking about starting it like online like, website for guitar teaching and all this stuff. And it’s kind of cool, but it doesn’t have like, like the end goal of me.

making more money for myself being like location independent so to kind of get back to it yeah like I did it because one I wanted to feel like I could make have a larger income and then to I could be location independent. Right so location dependent is huge for freelancers so they can work anywhere in the world so then you came across Freelancer masterclass you you graduated by the way what was your degree and in college? It was in marketing actually, okay. Went to school for marketing and then you decided I did? Yeah, what the heck, let’s become a freelancer. I don’t want to work at a j. o b job. You know, corporate eight to five. So tell me about you took the class, how long did it take you to go through the whole course.

So probably about like a month, month and a half, I think probably could have done it a little sooner. I was kind of juggling other things, but what did help me was I was I always like to like look

And stuff like one and a half speed. So, yeah, I heard your voice like, at super speed. That’s just regular speed though. I talk fast.

Right? I couldn’t imagine listening to myself on one and a half speed. But anyway, I know. So that’s why when i when i hear you now I’m just like, yeah, I’ve heard your voice a lot. So it’s, it’s,

you know, yeah,

that’s one of the things I struggle with. But also one of the things that I think separates me out from others is that I’m passionate about what I do. And I like to just respect people’s time and I just try to get too much information too fast. So I gotta work on slowing down. I do that on stage as well. I have to really, it’s really, you have to talk three times as low as you think you’re talking on stage, which is really an effort for me. When when I perform to like on stage, I would think the song is I would play the song like a little faster sometimes if I’m nervous, right. So yeah, it’s tough because I tend to like remind myself to slow

down or in tap my foot in just be consciously aware that I don’t play too fast. Yeah The thing I think that might be a good podcast in amongst itself is performing on stage but because you know freelancers like to give talks about their expertise sometimes but let’s let’s focus more on on your ability now to be a freelancer that you’ve done with Freelancer masterclass, you you finished up and I know you immediately got a couple jobs right. So I know at least one client you’re working with and you were just telling me before the podcast if you have another maybe a chiropractor you want to work with no need to mention names in the podcast, but so things are starting to roll for you now a little bit. Right.

Right. And something I something I kind of realized. I didn’t really realize this at first, but I think I was starting to be too picky. In the beginning. I was like, oh, there’s like this little job where I’m making like this lower hourly rate than I want to. And I was like, kind of just not applying for those online.

And I kind of realized like

That’s, you know, the alternative is just sitting around and not working or like doing something else, right? So it’s kind of good to be to not be as picky if you’re trying to, you know, get jobs in the beginning. So that’s what I did, I lowered, like, the bar for that to start took on more jobs, whether I was just like writing like few articles here and there, or whatever it was just like whatever I could find.

I would even like, kind of, look it up. I don’t know how to do this. So let me just figure it out and do it, you know, and I always wanted to make sure that

that my that the client I work with, like the day that I’ve meeting their expectations, so you know, obviously,

reputation management is huge, especially when you’re starting out as a freelancer and you’re on Upwork for example, and you want to make sure like that every person leaves you a five star review so you can start to build that up. That’s you know, that’s that’s bigger now today than ever

right though, not only do I want to take on jobs that I feel like I can deliver, but I want to make sure that the expectations are are clear from the start.

That’s a good point. That’s one of the things you learn about is extremely good communication before you even start working with a prospect and a client. What are some of the big takeaways from Freelancer masterclass that has really resonated with you?

So there was a there’s a few things.

I one of the things I liked was the, I mean, just to the general overview, I didn’t know what like a more successful Freelancer was doing. So

it helps to give me like a clear picture about what I’m even getting into, like, I don’t know what I’m getting into. It’s just like, you know, kind of scary and then you’re just like, is this even a good investment right time? I don’t know. So, kind of just starting out and being like, Okay, this is maybe what more of what I can expect the workload and

maybe what I could expect

To make the results I could expect to have in six months or something. Yep. Yeah, no, no, no, go ahead. That was a big one. And then other thing was like the documents. So, like, just generally legally, like, how do I protect myself? I don’t know anything about legal stuff. Yeah. So, you know, just that stuff alone. You know, some legal documents could be so worth so much. Right. I know. Monetary. Yeah. And, yeah. And then when documents I don’t know, it’s like, I didn’t expect that to be a big pain point. But everybody mentioned that. How right No, yeah, I think so. Because like I you know, I don’t know anything about it. And honestly, I didn’t even know really what a statement of work was, like, I got out of college. It was really just like school school. And working in a restaurant. It was just like, I had like big goals and stuff, but I didn’t really know how any way of how to get to them. So yeah, I think one of the biggest differences is, it’s

You’re on how I get to it.

You know, it’s not super clear, but you know, definitely a good start. Yeah, and I was just going to ask you now speaking along the lines of not being super clear, what is it you’re struggling with still or new struggles after that you’ve gotten a few clients now?

Yeah, I think it’s always changing, like, the problems that you’re facing. Right? Which is a good thing I don’t like to like have the same problem where you’re just like, feel like it’s just a constantly the same. So the great thing about starting to do this, like,

work on doing more freelancing is not I feel like I’m not too limited with my potential right now. There’s like a lot of different ways I can go about it. I can try to take on bigger clients.

But But I think right now, it’s,

you know, more recently been How can I make sure these expectations are clear with each client, so that once I’m done with them

They’re happy to pay me. And they want to leave a good review. And it’s really easy for them to pay me they’re like, wow, no, like, it’s definitely worth paying this guy because he’s done great work for me. Yeah. And then you know, on top of that wanting, you know if there’s work that needs to be done monthly, like monitoring their email or something, like they want to choose me for that versus some agency or something, right. So one of the things that you came to me with is you were saying, Mike, I’m going to take on some work and you had this ridiculously low hourly rate and I talked you out of it. I think I told you to double it or something like that. Awesome. Last month. Are you charging more now based on what you originally thought you were going to charge?

I am charging more. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. I’m charging more.

I’ve kind of started to like

you said, you know, you said to bring it higher, and I did and I was able to take on some clients.

At that rate, even if I saw like some other jobs on Upwork, and I didn’t have as many clients, I’m still okay to lower it because it’s better than like not having the work, at least, you know, for me right now. Yeah. You know, definitely in the future. When I have more work and I’m

busier and all that kind of stuff, then I can be more picky about who I choose, and then kind of filter out clients who I know I’d want to work with. Exactly. Yeah, I mean, that’s what people ask me, Mike, how do you charge what you charge sometimes I, I charge in excess of $300 an hour for private coaching. And so I’m like, you know what, it all depends on how busy you are. I mean, if you’re in demand and you’re still charging a lot, then then raise your rate again, you know, it’s like there’s there’s always a balancing act there. You rarely see good quality freelancers charging the same rate year after year. They’re always either raising it or lowering it, depending on the ebb and flow of their business. So right now, I think you’re just not charging enough really because you’re trying to find your niche. There’s so much in marketing, like

Like a writer, there’s so much in writing, like, you want to be a copywriter technical writer, you know, there’s a whole bunch of different fields of marketing. Once you find what you really like to do, then you niche and down to that particular industry, or type of client you want to work with, and then bam, then you can charge as much as you want, because you’re driving so much more value because you specialize in that in that area. Right. That’s great. I was, you know, I wanted to know, as far as near keys, you know, I think there’s a lot of things I don’t want to do.

Like, for example, copywriting, like, it’s interesting to me, it’s part of what I do, but I know that more long term, I don’t see myself being a copywriter. Yeah.

I think like for you, I’m curious how you kind of got into your niche of doing now. That’s a good question. I mean, I always liked being a leader ever since I was in the army. I liked leadership. So as a marketing strategist, someone who calls himself a fractional cmo, I’ll go into a company and I’ll be their marketing leader. I’ll

lead a team. And I really liked that aspect. There’s so many people that quote unquote, call themselves strategists. I mean, I just saw this funny report on LinkedIn, like one of the number one keywords in people’s profiles is strategists and in the word executioner, or execute or who wasn’t even the top 100. So everybody likes to strategize, but no one likes to do it. So, one of the things I like to say to clients is that I like to strategize and do which is true. And that’s how I found you know, my ultimately I found my niche by just working with a lot of clients. I mean, when I first got started with freelancing, I was doing SEO work. I mean, just doing exactly what you’re doing right now is just SEO work and just trying to learn how to service clients. And then one day, some clients said, Mike, I have this man, the marketing manager that I want to bring into my company to help some of your SEO work and I just really liked managing them. So then I started getting the project management strategy, and then more, you know, this that whole secret that movie The Secret where, you know, that confidence that

You exude just the client just start coming to you and say, can you help with this strategy? Can you help with this Leadership Initiative? Right? So eventually I just found that you know what, when you wake up one day and realize you don’t know what day it is, if you don’t care if it’s a Saturday or Tuesday, and that’s when you know, you really like your job and you found your niche. Right. Now, I’ve question to a mic. I’m flipping the interview.

Here’s the thing. So yeah, I think more long term, you know, I don’t, it’s not a clear path. And that’s because, you know, I do enjoy what I’m doing now, I want to figure out how to expand more how to make more.

It sounds like it wasn’t as clear for, you know, for you, because it kind of but you know, started to evolve as you can just execute in like, work with more clients. Right. And just kind of with each project, you kind of figure out okay, well, you know, what if I tried this differently, right?

Yeah, yeah, I mean,

Look, I’m I’ve never really settled in my niche. And even though I’ve been doing fractional cmo work for many years now, I mean, my initiative this year is to do more coaching and more public speaking. So your brain will always evolve your interest always evolve, you know,

I can just I can name 10 foods I hated three years ago, and now I love them. So it’s like you’re, your life always changes in the you don’t want to get too settled into your niche, but at the same time, you never want to be afraid to embrace one. So just listen to your brain, listen to your interests, and just go it’s really hard to pick a niche when you’re, you’re like, wow, if I’m only doing SEO now, I’m really alienating a lot of people but you’re not you’re actually bringing more people in because so many people, there’s so much money out there to grab and you just have to align your interests where that money is and then that’s the win win. Right.

Right. And I think 16 million freelancers, you know, Upwork has over a billion dollars of freelance work this year posted for freelancers, a billion dollar Yeah, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be capturing at least 100

Thousand Year if not 200,000. freelancing? Yeah. Well, I mean, to get to that point, you know, something I noticed on my analytics because I, so I’ve made a goal to apply to,

like for, like five

projects a day where I’ll create, like a

new I’m creating my script, I’m changing things in it. And then I’m applying to all these like different jobs every day.

And I’m like, would look at who’s viewed my profile for the week. And I the view that sometimes the views were pretty low. And I think one of the reasons is because my profile hasn’t been, like very,

you know, optimized yet. Yeah, like, yeah, like, I haven’t have like, a huge reputation of saying, Oh, this person may has made like, 100 k on Upwork this year in their job success is 100% You know? So I think that’s one of the one of the bigger challenge

just starting out, too. Yeah, I mean, Upwork the algorithm is, is complex and it’s simple at the same time, I give a lot of tips on Upwork profile optimization, but so many of them aren’t instant. I mean, a lot of it has to do with time. You know, I mean, as you know, I’m on the homepage of Upwork. That took two years for me. I mean, I don’t want to say I was striving to be on the homepage of Upwork. But it took two years for my profile to really be in the top of search results for very common words like marketing strategist, and you’ll get there. But just keep aggressive with applying for jobs. And then make sure that your profile is optimized, like what the tips and Freelancer masterclass said and you’re, you’re on the right track, there’s nothing you can do that will that will stop you because you’re doing everything right. I poured out all my tips in the master class on Upwork. And it’s from years of testing Upwork algorithm on what works and what doesn’t work.

Right, right. Yeah. So I mean, yeah, I mean, it’s really just about you know, me trying to just

Try to just do it trying to just figure out what works for me more in kind of going with it constantly making adjustments.

Another thing I liked about was productivity from the master class so kind of learning how to work more productively something I do now that I’ve changed is if I see my attention like waver from working on my laptop, I’ll just like

take like a 510 minute break or something. Yeah, and it just like a nice quick reset or I need to take a half hour like to go eat or something. And then I’ll come back in I’m refreshed and you know more focus. Yeah, I didn’t touch I did a few productivity tips and hacks and Freelancer masterclass, but ultimately it does warrant its own course I am making

productivity and efficiency course add on for Freelancer masterclass. But, you know, there’s a lot of things in neuroscience I’m obsessed with neuroscience now. It’s my passion in the last, I don’t know year so maybe half a year. But one of the

Productivity hacks is 52 minutes on 17 minutes off, that’s the ultimate focus to get your body in the mind and flow. Flow is where your mind is just like hyper focused on what you’re doing. I have to force myself to take breaks every 52 minutes because I’m really into my work. But honestly, it’s an investment in your time and you do that. And there are timers, there’s, I mean, there’s timers on on apps on phones, but I don’t even recommend having your phone in your room when you’re when you’re working. But you can set a timer like a stopwatch for 52 minutes, and when it goes off, you have to walk away and take a break. And I don’t mean take a break, like check social media, like if you are on your computer, walk away and walk your dog or something like get out of here. Keeping your body your mind and flow. You’ll get more done in a day than you will the most people who will do in two weeks. It’s amazing the difference. So you guys are in 52 off 52 on 17 off. Yeah, I think another thing too is like I think you might have mentioned this too was like meditation a bit.

I did a whole class on meditation. He did. Yeah. So, you know, with that i would i do do try to do that every morning. And I think like, meditation alone has taught totally helps for my focus level. Yeah. Like, I probably have like a DD or something. Yeah, one of the greatest things you could do is meditation. That’s why I put it in. That’s one of the greatest impacts of my freelancing career is when I started to meditate on a regular basis. It’s an investment in your time. It’s not like oh, no, I have to meditate for 30 minutes, or 20 minutes. How do I find time? I actually feel like I get more time back when I meditate them when I don’t. It’s weird. But once you get good at meditating, which takes a couple weeks really, really great. And I’m glad that you’re seeing the benefits of it. I use headspace Do you use anything? Any kind of app on your phone to meditate? Do you use like the paid headspace? Yeah, I just got a year subscription actually. So I actually started with it. I use like the like the free one has like the first 10 classes.

Yeah, so I kind of got that because I was I didn’t even know how to meditate. Like, I was like, What does that even mean? But it’s very subjective kind of thing anyway. Um, you know, I just, it’s, I keep it simple. I started with that. And now I just keep to myself, like all y’all I don’t use it up, I’ll just kind of sit in my chair, you know, deep breaths for like 10 minutes, and then I’ll go into like, thinking of goals, I have visualizing visualization, you know, yep, visualization before the day even starts. Or you know, that’s how I start the day versus even looking at my phone. I won’t even do it until after that, and then like breakfast, and then I’ll look at it later. Great. Meditation is great. It’s free. It’s easy, and you really can’t even go wrong with it. I mean, there’s ways to do it more efficiently than others. But really, there’s nothing that you can like be detrimental and be doing it backwards. So yeah, keep embracing it. Whether it’s self guided or not. That’s great. How can our audience find you online maybe a freelancer wants to hire you for SEO work or some other type of market

So my name is Michael Hill. H, I ll you find me on Upwork offer services for SEO, email marketing paid ads right now.

You know. So that’s kind of where I’m starting out with and been getting doing great with clients, having everyone I’ve worked with has been

really happy with what I’ve been doing. Great. So I mean, I’m excited. It’s really just the beginning. I’m definitely setting big goals for next year, so

awesome. Well, thanks so much for joining me, Michael. And we’ll touch base soon. Thanks so much. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Want to know what it’s like as a new freelancer? In this podcast, I interview Michael Hill who went through Freelancer Masterclass and is now on his own getting contracts from clients   RAW TRANSCRIPT:   Get ready for freelancing strategies, Want to know what it’s like as a new freelancer? In this podcast, I interview Michael Hill who went through Freelancer Masterclass and is now on his own getting contracts from clients   RAW TRANSCRIPT:   Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer … An interview with new freelancer Michael Hill Read More » Mike Volkin 22:53
An interview with Ana Melikian-Efficiency tips for freelancers https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-ana-melikian/ Tue, 31 Dec 2019 15:15:12 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=7056 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-ana-melikian/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-ana-melikian/feed/ 0 As a technology coach, Ana Melikian shows us how to be efficient with our technology to improve our productivity. Show Notes Questions 1.How did you get into mindset coaching? 2. So your niche isn’t just to help coaches, it’s to help with the tech side of coaching right? 3. Tell me about the Mindset Zone …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-ana-melikian/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Ana Melikian-Efficiency tips for freelancers</span> Read More »</a></p> As a technology coach, Ana Melikian shows us how to be efficient with our technology to improve our productivity.

Show Notes
Questions
1.How did you get into mindset coaching?
2. So your niche isn’t just to help coaches, it’s to help with the tech side of coaching right?
3. Tell me about the Mindset Zone podcast.
4. Can you give our freelance audience some actionable tips that will help them increase their efficiency today through technology?
5. What is one thing that freelancers really get wrong on the tech side of their business?
6. How can our audience follow you online?

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As a technology coach, Ana Melikian shows us how to be efficient with our technology to improve our productivity. Show Notes Questions 1.How did you get into mindset coaching? 2. So your niche isn’t just to help coaches, As a technology coach, Ana Melikian shows us how to be efficient with our technology to improve our productivity. Show Notes Questions 1.How did you get into mindset coaching? 2. So your niche isn’t just to help coaches, it’s to help with the tech side of coaching right? 3. Tell me about the Mindset Zone … An interview with Ana Melikian-Efficiency tips for freelancers Read More » Mike Volkin 12:23
What Courses Comprise of Freelancer Masterclass? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-courses-comprise-of-freelancer-masterclass/ Thu, 26 Dec 2019 19:04:56 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6935 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-courses-comprise-of-freelancer-masterclass/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-courses-comprise-of-freelancer-masterclass/feed/ 0 There are 9 courses within Freelancer Masterclass. The course structure took about as long as developing the topics within each course. Determining which courses for freelancers to include in the masterclass, and in what order, took research not only from my many years of experience but from talking with dozens of top freelancers. Let’s dive …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-courses-comprise-of-freelancer-masterclass/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What Courses Comprise of Freelancer Masterclass?</span> Read More »</a></p> There are 9 courses within Freelancer Masterclass. The course structure took about as long as developing the topics within each course. Determining which courses for freelancers to include in the masterclass, and in what order, took research not only from my many years of experience but from talking with dozens of top freelancers.

Let’s dive into these courses in detail.

 


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success

brought to you by Freelancer masterclass

calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone.

Hello and welcome to another episode of freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin, your host and lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass. Today, we’re going to be talking about what comprises a freelancer masterclass. So many of you email me and say, What are these courses about? I see nine steps. So let me give you more detail in addition to what’s on the website. First of all, there’s, as I mentioned, nine courses there’s actually a bonus 10th course but you won’t find that out until you register. Nine courses are as follows the foundational requirements for success, branding and position Marketing for clients, working with clients working with other freelancers, money management, tools and resources, work life balance and troubleshooting. And that was the hardest part of developing Freelancer master classes determining what those nine steps should be and in what order they’re meant to be taken in order. So let’s start with the first one foundational requirements for success. You know, even experienced freelancers get a lot out of this course. Because if your foundations aren’t correct, and nothing else seems to fall into place, think of it like building a house, the foundation comes first. If the foundation isn’t level or built properly, then the rest of the house won’t be built properly. And the same goes for your freelancing career. There are foundational core skills you need in order to really excel as a freelancer. So that’s what that chapter is about. or courses about. The next one is about branding and positioning. So a freelancer does need a brand themselves. It’s like any other branded company like Apple coke. But there’s a difference in the personal branding versus product branding. So as a freelancer, your brand is your identity and how your clients are perceived by you. So we have a branding expert named hunter Kali that comes in, while she’s more of a of a social media expert. So she does a lot of branding, as well. And she talks about how to brand yourself on social media and find your niche. And it’s just, it’s a great course and I go through some of the classes as well. Each course consists of several classes or what I call topics within the master class. So branding and positioning really puts you in the light of how your clients are going to perceive you online and how your reputation is going to be perceived online as well. The next one marketing for clients is probably the most comprehensive of all the courses probably because I’m a marketing expert myself and I liked I liked making this this course more than any other course but I also did have a couple guests instructors in one is Dermalogica woman who’s a expert at creating fantastic websites. She’s a copywriter, Hunter colleague does make another appearance, Chelsea Craig, who’s the owner of Rhino reviews, who’s excellent at reputation management, we all chime in on this course. And we go through the bigger benefits of how you’re going to tell your story and how you’re going to bring in clients consistently. So you can avoid any dry spells that seem to plague a lot of freelancers out there. And the next course is on working with clients. And this naturally comes after you know how to bring in clients now, you know, have now you know, now you need to know how to work with them. Okay, so you’re going to learn how to master discovery call, how to ask the right questions, and how to get the prospect excited to work with you. And you’re also going to learn a lot about pricing strategies and how to get paid well for what you’re doing. You don’t have to be the low price Walmart leader in freelancing and least you shouldn’t, especially if you’re enrolled in Freelancer master class, you’re going to command a premium price and one of the most important assets This next course working with other freelancers, a great source of work should come with your network of other freelancers don’t just think of freelancers, as someone who’s going to help you with work or, or work that you can outsource to them. They’re actually great to bring in work. So we’re going to talk about how to create partnerships with other freelancers in this course and also how to communicate with them when you’re working with them. It’s very important to understand managing up so we have a whole class on managing up within this course. Another courses on money management, a lot of times newer, and even experienced freelancers, they come from the corporate world right so they don’t really know how to manage money, their their extent of managing money was all about, hey, let me just take this paycheck from my work and put it in the bank or even better a direct deposit. You don’t have to do anything but with as a freelancer, you’re working for yourself. You have money coming in. You have money going out to other freelancers, maybe and there’s a you know, an ebb and flow of how you should manage your money how you should prepare for taxes. This isn’t this doesn’t go into like the taxes. But this shows how to save for the right amount of taxes. So it shows you how to set up separate bank accounts and where the money should flow once it comes in. So there’s no surprises and all that good stuff.

tools and resources, there’s tons of new tools, there’s tons of old tools, tons of timeless tools and resources out there for freelancers. Once you become a professional freelancer, you will notice that anybody and everybody is trying to get money from you because they have some cool service that will save you time or money or make you money. And what we do is we outline the best ones, we show you how to best use them. We tell you how to avoid the expensive ones and how you can kind of growth, hack it and piecemeal together on your own. So we are always updating this section, myself and my instructors to bring you the latest and greatest tools and resources in the freelancing world. And then last but not least, we have a actually it’s not least it’s the second to last class. Work in life balance. So when you work out of your house as a freelancer It’s really hard to stay focused and keep your work life separate from your home life. You know, for example, I have a six month old child at home, I hear her crying, I want to stop what I’m doing and, and go out there and comfort her. And likewise, I hear her laughing and playing in the other room and I want to go play with her as well. So it’s really hard to keep focused and we go through some of those pain points that you might experience working from home and how to really create a good work, working, efficient, focused life in your home office. And then the last but not least, troubleshooting no matter how good you are freelancing, trouble will arise. I’m going to walk you through some of the common problems that freelancers have, especially dealing with lawsuit threats, no matter how good you are, you’re probably going to get sued or even the threat of being sued at some point. We’re going to talk to you about how to identify and deal with different difficult clients that you might be exposed to. Not all clients are perfect, managed. These issues are going to save you thousands of dollars in huge headaches and lots of times so this this troubleshooting section alone as short as it is, is just a huge it’ll pay for the course over and above itself many times over. So that is a little bit more about Freelancer masterclass focus

convinces you to become a student. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

 

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There are 9 courses within Freelancer Masterclass. The course structure took about as long as developing the topics within each course. Determining which courses for freelancers to include in the masterclass, and in what order, There are 9 courses within Freelancer Masterclass. The course structure took about as long as developing the topics within each course. Determining which courses for freelancers to include in the masterclass, and in what order, took research not only from my many years of experience but from talking with dozens of top freelancers. Let’s dive … What Courses Comprise of Freelancer Masterclass? Read More » Mike Volkin 7:38
How to Make 35 Percent More Money Freelancing Instantly https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-35-percent-more-money-freelancing-instantly/ Thu, 26 Dec 2019 18:37:29 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6924 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-35-percent-more-money-freelancing-instantly/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-35-percent-more-money-freelancing-instantly/feed/ 0 I outline the top 7 mistakes freelancers make and how to fix them for an instant boost in revenue. This freelancing tutorial will be about making money. There are a lot of other benefits to being a freelancer, but for the sake of this video, we will be solely focused on the money aspect. As …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-35-percent-more-money-freelancing-instantly/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Make 35 Percent More Money Freelancing Instantly</span> Read More »</a></p> I outline the top 7 mistakes freelancers make and how to fix them for an instant boost in revenue. This freelancing tutorial will be about making money. There are a lot of other benefits to being a freelancer, but for the sake of this video, we will be solely focused on the money aspect. As an entrepreneur coach and lead instructor of Freelancer Masterclass, I can tell you from experience that money is a major motivator for transitioning from a side-hustle to full-time freelancer. This freelancing tutorial was written specifically for those transitioning to being a full-time freelancer.

 

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Raw Transcript

Hello everyone, Mike Volkin here with Freelancer masterclass and the freelancer school podcast. Today we’re going to be talking about how to make 35% more money freelancing instantly. So how do we do that? Well, we have identified seven common mistakes that I have noticed after working with hundreds of freelancers. And even one of these mistakes could help tremendously but combination of these mistakes could increase. Stopping these mistakes could increase your revenue 35% or more. So let’s talk about the first one, which alone would increase your revenue 35% more if you stopped doing this

Working eight to five. All right, this is especially for new freelancers who have been accustomed to the corporate world where they clock in at eight, and they clock out at five. And that’s their work day. But advances in neuroscience lately show us the optimal time that the human brain can be productive. It is the what’s called flow. And you as a freelancer need to keep in flow to keep ultra productive and ultra efficient. So what does that flow time, the optimal time a human brain can stay focused is around 52 minutes, given a 17 minute break. Now what you should be doing is working for 52 minutes, and then taking a break and doing something else for 17 minutes. So if you’re in front of a computer, then for your 17 minute break, you’re going to step away and I don’t know take your dog for a walk or something. All right, that is the way you should work and it’s tough. If you love what you’re doing, and you need to get your teeth into it and really just start writing. It’s tough to get away after every 52 minutes, but I’m telling you from experience

That time will come back to you

three fold or more because you’ll be super productive when you come back. So make that a habit. Mistake number two.

How to get a drink, they’re inconsistent prospecting. When times get busy freelancers stop prospecting for work. It’s just natural. You’d say, Well, I’m so busy. Why should I spend time prospecting for it? But there’s a lag time there, usually between when a prospect actually needs you to work, like right away. And when you’re developing a relationship with them, almost always, with just a few exceptions. Now, I’d say probably, on average, less than 20% does a prospect need to hire you right now.

And even if they do that, there’s a problem with that prospect, that client is probably not the best one to work with because they’re very reactive and they need they’re going to be that client that needs everything done right away. What you’re doing when you’re freelancing is you’re developing relationships. And you might need to talk to someone now for a job three months from now. So you should always block off

At least an hour of every day, either networking with your existing network to bring in referrals or taking a new prospect calls to start a new relationship.

Mistake number three accepting all work too many freelancers just accept all work that comes to them. And I understand it I I always there at the point for many years where I just I wanted the billable hours I needed to fill my calendar. But I’m telling you from experience that you need to start filling your calendar with work that interests you the most, you need to start saying no, there’s been so many authors, notable businessmen that says the best word in business, the best thing you can do for your business is to say no, because that way your brain your mind stays focused consciously and subconsciously, on the work that you need to fill your calendar with. I’m telling you, you need to start saying no to work that comes in that doesn’t suit the highest and best value of work that you can do. Mistake number four setting your rate incorrectly. Set your hourly rate too low and you come off as cheap.

You’re also telling your prospects and clients, hey, I might even go even lower. I’m trying to be the low price leader. All right, and then there’s the flip side of that setting it too high. And you price yourself out of a job. Maybe your value, in your experience don’t exude what you’re trying to do. I had a an agency where I had a low level marketing manager. She was, let’s just say she was bad at what she did. All right, I got rid of her really fast after her first couple deliverables with a client. So then I saw her on Upwork. And she was charging more than me. And she had less than a quarter of the experience and she was sloppy and English was even her first language and she was trying to work in the US market. And it was just a mess. And she stopped getting work from what I heard from someone else. It’s like why would you price yourself that high. She just got a big ego. She worked with me which was she was using my name with clients and my agency which was had a good name at the time. Will had a good name until I shut down the agency. But the proper or the best way to say this is if you

Price yourself too high, given the value that you’re exuding to your clients and the way you sell yourself, you’re just not going to get very much work. So how do you set your rate correctly? Well, there’s a lot of ways to do this, the easiest way is to subtract three zeros from your goal that doesn’t really show what value you’re going to give to clients. But let’s just say that your goal is 100,000 a year, right? You subtract three zeros from 100,000, that equals $100. That’s your hourly rate $100. Now see if you can get booked with that. If you can’t, you got to lower your rate. If you if you’re too full. With work, then you’ve got to increase your rate. So use that as like a central guideline to kind of play around with where you should be in terms of what value you can provide to your clients. Okay. Mistake number five, not limiting communication with clients freelancers want to react fast to their clients. It’s just natural. But it’s actually a productivity killer for your business if every time I just heard my phone go off, let me let me go reply up. I just heard I just saw this message and Facebook. Come

up, I just got a text message.

And you might say, but Mike, how would I lose clients being a great communicator? Well, that’s the difference here. You’re not being a great communicator, you’re being a fast communicator. This is the way and we talked about this in Freelancer masterclass. This is the way you need to structure your your communication with your clients, when you first bring on a client, you you tell them you give them a welcome email saying this is what it’s going to be like working with me, this is the way I can provide the best value. And one of those bullet points is I respond to my emails three times a day, or one time a day, whatever.

I will respond to all emails within one business day or two business day, whatever you’re comfortable with. I do not respond to messages on this, this and this. Now I tell them specifically I do not respond to slack on

Skype. If you want to get ahold of me, the best way is through email. Do not text me. I do not respond to texts. The texts are for emergencies for family members only.

Again, the best way to get ahold of me is through email. That’s what I say.

That way, they know exactly what to expect. And they will respect your time more when you do that. Now, here’s another big issue with this is that when you start responding to your clients and all these different platforms, and maybe the second month goes by and you’re a little bit slower, maybe instead of responding right away, you respond every 20 minutes, which is still a great response rate. But then your clients see that as a drop off in performance, okay? Even though you’re responding faster than 99% of all other freelancers, you’re still showing yourself as someone who isn’t responding as well as you previously did. So you’re setting an unrealistic expectation for yourself, and you’re going to be a slave to all sorts of different communication methods. I have this Freelancer that I work with, he’s just working 80 hours a week, and the actual productivity is like, like two or 10 hours, like he’s hardly doing anything, because they’ve got all these clients and he’s always just blah, blah, blah, just responding to different Skype messages and slack and he’s hardly ever getting a chance to actually work on clients work, and then they drop them because they didn’t he doesn’t get anything done. So you don’t want to get stuck in that rat hole.

Mistake number six, using the try fail and give up approach. This is very common for marketing. And even marketers do this unknowingly. marketing works very well if you want to market yourself, okay, but only if you have your approach dialed in. So I had this Freelancer

trainee, someone, I’m his mentor, and he says, You know what, Mike, I set up this marketing funnel to bring in some high value clients, and it started the top of the funnel started with Google ads. So I threw $200 into Google ads, and then I stopped because I wasn’t getting any calls. And so how do you know that $200 is enough? I mean, how many clicks that it gets your website Oh, I got 13 clicks or 30 clicks, whatever he said. And it was barely even enough he just he he spent all this time setting up this funnel with this webinar and this free call to action and he’s going to take calls and he had his VA that was going to answer phones

and it gives it a try for 18 clicks or whatever it was just so ridiculously low number. So when you set up marketing, you have to give it its due to

To be able to see if it works. And then if it’s not working, don’t just shut it down, revamp it. Where was it in the funnel that wasn’t working? Was it the text on the ad? Was it something on the landing page? Was that the call to action? Like, what was that? That wasn’t working, don’t just shut it down. Alright. And the last tip I want to talk to you about the mistake is working without goals. Working without goals is like getting a car to drive somewhere but having no destination. All right, you should be reviewing your goals weekly. I personally have a yearly goal. I make them I chunk them out in quarterly installments. So every quarter year, every three months, and then I put in my calendar every week to review where I’m at. So if I’m ahead of the goal, great. If How can I keep up that momentum? If I’m behind the goal, what did I do wrong? How can I change things in the army, we call that the AAR the after action review. So we’re always reviewing our goals, reviewing what mission we just had, and then figuring out what went right and what went wrong. And every single week for an hour. I do that and it’s the best hour I spent

In my business, and it makes me the most money. And the goals don’t have to be monetary. All right, they can be anything, whatever your goal is, if it’s still spend more time with your daughter or your spouse, or maybe it’s the work, your goal is to work out of your house more whatever it is, you just your goals have to be written down and chunked out and baby steps almost and just have to be reviewed often. So any one of these are changed. If you change any one of these in your business, you’re going to do fine, and you could possibly increase your revenue instantly. 35% so if you’re not doing if you’re doing any of these mistakes, you can stop doing them and you see an instant increase in revenue. Good luck. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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I outline the top 7 mistakes freelancers make and how to fix them for an instant boost in revenue. This freelancing tutorial will be about making money. There are a lot of other benefits to being a freelancer, but for the sake of this video, I outline the top 7 mistakes freelancers make and how to fix them for an instant boost in revenue. This freelancing tutorial will be about making money. There are a lot of other benefits to being a freelancer, but for the sake of this video, we will be solely focused on the money aspect. As … How to Make 35 Percent More Money Freelancing Instantly Read More » Mike Volkin 10:55
Freelancing Training with Freelancer Masterclass https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelancing-training/ Thu, 26 Dec 2019 17:20:36 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6913 https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelancing-training/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelancing-training/feed/ 0 Getting freelancing training through Freelancer Masterclass was designed for a specific reason, to help freelancers get the income and life they deserve. Every part of Freelancer Masterclass was designed around that purpose. The problem with online courses is the lack of action and accountability. When I set out to design the freelancing training and tutorials, …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelancing-training/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Freelancing Training with Freelancer Masterclass</span> Read More »</a></p> Getting freelancing training through Freelancer Masterclass was designed for a specific reason, to help freelancers get the income and life they deserve. Every part of Freelancer Masterclass was designed around that purpose. The problem with online courses is the lack of action and accountability. When I set out to design the freelancing training and tutorials, I made it a point to make every aspect of the course actionable. I want the students to know exactly how to execute what is being taught.

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“The problem with online courses is the lack of action and accountability”

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The other issue is accountability. So, you watch a bunch of videos, then what? Then there is a big gap between what the student has learned and what they will actually do. When I realized this, I expanded Freelancer Masterclass to be more than simply pre-recorded videos. The Masterclass now includes quizzes. materials and on-going education.

There are lots of resources online to get freelancing training, but never has so much actionable step-by-step information been packed into a single course.

Why Would Anyone Want Freelancing Training in the First Place?

Being a freelancer is, in my opinion, one of the best jobs you can have. You can do the type of work you love and work whenever you want, you don’t have to adhere to an 8-5 Monday through Friday schedule. And, if you’re good at being a freelancer, you can pick and choose the clients you want to work with and even command the pay you want. Imagine that, commanding your own pay. So often, society tells us you have to work for a company and that company will tell you what you’re worth. They will tell you what you will get paid, they will tell you how much vacation time you’ll get, they’ll even tell you where to sit 40 hours a week.

The best part about being a freelancer is being able to live your purpose. By living your purpose, I mean you can align your life’s purpose with your work. For example, I love teaching people. More specifically, I love teaching people how to live the life they want and get rewarded for it.

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“The best part about being a freelancer is being able to live your purpose.”

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I asked a Freelancer Masterclass student the other day what their life purpose was. She said she wanted to help people avoid getting cancer (she was a cancer survivor herself). So now, she has a freelancing career where she is able to consult with people on all sorts of topics in regards to living a cancer-free life.

Don’t get me wrong, there are some downsides to freelancing, I describe them in this podcast. But the benefits far outweigh the drawbacks.

Freelancing allows you job security too. Yes, job security! Most people think of freelancing as the opposite. But Mike you may ask, “how can freelancing provide job security? It’s so competitive and you could lose a client very fast.” Think about it from this perspective, as a salaried employee, how many jobs do you have? One, right? What happens when you lose that one job? You lose 100% of your income, right? Now, compare that to a freelancer. As a decent freelancer, how many jobs do you have at any given time? 6, 10, 12 jobs at any given time? And what happens when you lose one client? Well, you still have 5, 9, 11 jobs, right? That’s what I mean when I say that job security as a freelancer is better than it is at a salaried job. And the worst part about a salaried job is you are “stuck” in the middle class. If the middle class is fine with you, then great. But for an entrepreneur, the middle class is not the goal.

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“For an entrepreneur, the middle class is not the goal.”

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What’s Wrong with the Middle Class?

Nothing is wrong with the middle class. For many, the middle class is just fine. According to CBS News “Middle-income families earn a median annual income of slightly more than $78,000 — and haven’t seen their earnings improve much since 2000.“

That’s a powerful statistic. In 20 years, the middle class hasn’t seen their earnings income improve much. Why is that? It’s because society is forcing us to:

  • Get an education
  • Get a salaried job
  • Save for retirement

All of that advice is, excuse the language, BULL CRAP.

Fact: Some of the top billionaires in the world never graduated from college.

Fact: Getting a salaried 8-5 job is specifically designed to put a cap on your income and force you into the middle class. No one EVER got rich working a salaried job.

Fact: Saving for retirement is great if you want enough money to do all the things you want to do when your young, but too old to do it. What’s the sense of having money at the end of your life if you can’t even bend over to pick up a dollar bill?

Yes, you should be saving money, don’t think I am telling you not to save. But the goal shouldn’t be to save it for retirement. Your goal should be to 1) live your life so work doesn’t feel like work and 2) Have enough money way before retirement age to do with your money what you want to do with it.

How Can Freelancing Be So Lucrative?

From a monetary perspective, freelancing is great for both the freelancer and companies hiring freelancers. The great aspect of being a full-time freelancer is generally the gig economy which encompasses freelancers is largely known as a “side-hustle”. People only think it’s for part-timers. This is great for people like me who make a living freelancing full-time. The door is left wide open for me to charge what I want, not have to worry about competition and work with clients I love. Why? Because so many people don’t take it seriously. They will tell their clients they can work on their projects after work or on the weekends. Guess what? Clients don’t want that! So after a company will talk to me, and then a “side-hustler”, the choice is clear. They choose to work with someone who is a professional freelancer and they are willing to pay a premium price for it. From my perspective, they get the value out of me they want and deserve.

If you want to get the freelancing training you need to be a full-time freelancer to command the salary and freedom you deserve, then there is no excuse not to join Freelancer Masterclass today. It’s time to take back control!

Tell me your thoughts. Share this post and tell me if this blog has changed your perception of what a freelancer is capable of.

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Getting freelancing training through Freelancer Masterclass was designed for a specific reason, to help freelancers get the income and life they deserve. Every part of Freelancer Masterclass was designed around that purpose. Getting freelancing training through Freelancer Masterclass was designed for a specific reason, to help freelancers get the income and life they deserve. Every part of Freelancer Masterclass was designed around that purpose. The problem with online courses is the lack of action and accountability. When I set out to design the freelancing training and tutorials, … Freelancing Training with Freelancer Masterclass Read More » Mike Volkin clean 13:40
How and Why to Hire a Freelance Training Consultant https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-training-consultant/ Thu, 26 Dec 2019 16:29:56 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6903 https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-training-consultant/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-training-consultant/feed/ 0 As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual growth for the industry over the next five years. Some …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-training-consultant/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How and Why to Hire a Freelance Training Consultant</span> Read More »</a></p> As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual growth for the industry over the next five years. Some of this popularity is due to popular rideshare services like Uber and Lyft. However, there are millions of service-based providers called freelancers that work for companies of all sizes. Because of this rapid rise, a new job has emerged called the freelance training consultant. If you prefer to listen to some tips on this subject, feel free to review my podcast on this subject.

What is a Freelance Training Consultant?

Simply put, a freelance training consultant helps freelancers make money and live the life of freedom they desire. It sounds less complicated than it really is, so let’s dissect this a bit. Over my decades of experience working with hundreds of freelancers, I have come to learn three main pain points that freelancers have. People become freelancers for three main reasons:

  1. To make more money
  2. To have a more flexible work schedule
  3. To fulfill their life purpose

As a freelance training consultant, I have to keep all three of these in mind when working with a client.

Many think my core focus is just on money, but ill tell you from experience, the primary pain point I deal with more than money is the desired flexibility of a work schedule. Why? More people are wanting to work from home. Traffic isn’t getting any better so the commute sucks, and homeschooling children is getting more popular. Each of these is easier to do when you work from home. The typical 8 am-5 pm job is dwindling away.

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“The typical 8 am- 5 pm job is dwindling away.”

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Why Do Companies Hire Freelancers in the First Place?

There are several factors why companies want to hire freelancers

  • Advances in neuroscience – Over the last decade, what we are learning about the brain is fascinating. Neuroscience is proving to us that the brain isn’t designed to work 8 straight hours in a row. The human brain is far more productive working in sprints of 50 minutes on and 10 minutes off. Progressive companies are noticing this shift in productivity and turning to freelancers who work on schedules like these because they are far more productive.
  • Specialization -In many cases, freelancers tend to be more specialized in particular tasks. So as companies get more niched and specialized in what they do, freelancers are needed to carry out specific tasks.
  • Laws-The laws in each state to carry an employee are getting more and more difficult to keep up with. Being from California and someone who has employees, I’ll tell you from experience the politicians are not making it easy on small businesses. Everybody wants to dip their hands in the pockets of small businesses and hiring a freelancer is easier and quicker with less regulation. However, at least in California, the politicians are changing this too. Some legislation has already been passed, and there is more coming, that makes hiring a freelancer more difficult and costly. The main problem with this is a vast majority of politicians have never run a business, so they have no idea how difficult it is, nor do they fully understand how much we contribute to the economy. As a result, they taking the hardest-working contingent of their population and they ask for more and more handouts. But I digress, I won’t continue on my rant 😊.

Why Hire a Freelance Training Consultant?

If you’re a freelancer and want to do freelancing full-time, you have a big advantage. Most freelancers are part-time and don’t treat their work as a business. This leaves more room for someone like yourself to act as a professional and really capture a lot of work. This is where a freelance training consultant comes in. Someone like myself, with decades (yes decades plural) of experience being a freelancer, I can navigate you through the pitfalls of being a freelancer and help you scale faster than if you were working without a coach.

Given the three pain points listed in the first paragraph of this post, I work on three items with my students:

  1. How can we make you more money
  2. How can we get you a more flexible work schedule
  3. How do we fulfill your life purpose

If you are a freelancer and have more money, a more flexible work schedule and you are fulfilling your life’s purpose you feel like you are on top of the world. It feels as if you don’t even have a job, it’s an amazing feeling. It’s almost like someone is paying you to be retired.

One of the things I can do, almost immediately when hired is make you money. And even though that isn’t a top objective for a lot of freelancers, I focus on this first because I want you to be able to see the return on investment you’ll get when hiring me. So many freelancers, over 99%, don’t know how to bring in the right clients, charge the right rate, or keep a client long enough. So when I am evaluating you and your business practices, I go through each of these points to determine where there is the most opportunity to make you more money.

What Should I Look for to Select the Right One?

Of course, with any growing industry, you have “posers”. These are people who will overstate their qualifications and overpromise and underdeliver. Unfortunately, some of these posers are now becoming freelance training consultants. They will create a website and do some marketing exaggerating how much money they make and how easy it is to do it. They will charge you an outrageous rate to work with them and you guessed it, not have a refund policy in place.

When evaluating what freelance training consultant to hire, answer the following questions:

  • How much experience does this freelancer have training others?
  • Does this freelancer have a good reputation online?
  • Is there a formal training process in place?
  • Will this freelancer give me personal attention?
  • Does this freelancer have a lot of press? This is important because if people are willing to write about this training consultant as an expert, then s/he must be an authority on some subject (in most cases).
  • Do I truly believe I can make my money back, and more when I pay this consultant money?

What Questions Should I Ask?

When you get on a call with a training consultant you should ask the following questions and rate each answer 1 through 10. 1 being the worst score and 10 being the best. Total the score once you’re done with the conversation. If the score totals below an 80, this person is not the right fit for you. If the score totals between 80 and 90, this person would be a good fit. If the score totals over 90, you have a fantastic match.

  • How much experience do you have as a freelancer?
  • Take me through the steps of the process of how you like to develop a freelancer’s career.
  • What would I expect to be accomplished after working with you for three months?
  • What were your biggest failures as a freelancer?
  • What are the common attributes a freelancer like me would need to have to double my freelancing rate (or more)?
  • What are some obstacles I would face as a freelancer and how would you help me overcome them?
  • Will we be working together 1 on 1?
  • What is your main expertise and how do you charge clients (i.e. hourly, flat-rate, etc.)
  • Do you have a refund policy in place?
  • Do you work in a particular industry?

How Much Should I Pay?

This is a common question I get because the range of what consultant’s charge is all over the place. I’ll tell you from experience hiring me if not cheap. You are paying a premium price to work with me because the demand is high. The demand is high for a reason. This is typically the case with consulting fees. Consultants raise their rates when their demand is high simply because their time is money and when their time is spread thin, and there are people waiting to pay, the rates are raised. So if I consultant tells you his rate is $10/hour to help you become a better freelancer, what should that tell you about the quality of their work or what they can do for you? Well, if you are hoping to charge more than $10/hour you shouldn’t hire a consultant/mentor who is only charging you $10/hour. Typically, you shouldn’t pay a consultant less per hour than what you want to charge your clients. Many freelance training consultants have package deals, which is great. This ensures longevity in the relationship and allows you to save some money by bundling sessions together.

Are Group Sessions Ok?

Yes, in most cases. Group sessions are ok if you have direct access to the consultant. I know several consultants who don’t even give their email or phone out to their students. They meet on Skype or Zoom for an hour every other week with other students, they discuss a general topic and the consultant leaves. Those kinds of sessions are not worth paying for. However, if you can ask personalized questions to the consultant and still get the benefit of working with other students, that is a great combination.

Working with other students may not seem like a benefit, but you’ll be surprised at how often other freelancers will have the same exact issues as you. Being with other students will also help you feel like you’re a part of a community and relationships will develop, even working relationships. I have been in group sessions where referrals have occurred. Freelancers will give other freelancers work, simply because they know, and trust, each other.

Conclusion

Ultimately, hiring a freelance training consultant is definitely the way to go if you want to be a full-time freelancer, just be cautious of who you hire. Just ask the right questions and use the point system I referenced earlier. Ultimately, go with the little man inside of you, what does he say? The little man is always right 😊

In addition to hiring a freelance training consultant, you should get the proper education and materials needed to jumpstart your freelancing career. Be sure to sign up for Freelancer Masterclass and start building toward your goals. Share this article and comment below on some tips you have when hiring a freelance training consultant.

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As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual growth for the industry over the next five years. Some … How and Why to Hire a Freelance Training Consultant Read More » Mike Volkin clean 14:02
What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-to-look-for-when-hiring-a-freelance-training-consultant/ Thu, 26 Dec 2019 03:57:33 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6899 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-to-look-for-when-hiring-a-freelance-training-consultant/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-to-look-for-when-hiring-a-freelance-training-consultant/feed/ 0 What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-to-look-for-when-hiring-a-freelance-training-consultant/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant</span> Read More »</a></p> What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant

As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual growth for the industry over the next five years. Some of this popularity is due to popular rideshare services like Uber and Lyft. However, there are millions of service-based providers called freelancers that work for companies of all sizes. Because of this rapid rise, a new job has emerged called the freelance training consultant.
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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone.

Hello guys, Mike Volkin here with Freelancer masterclass. Today, we’re going to be talking about freelance training, consulting, how and why you should hire one and maybe some reasons why you shouldn’t and some things you should look out for before you hire one and start to evaluate them. So let’s go ahead and discuss First things first, let’s talk about why people become freelancers. There’s three main reasons and working with, I would say hundreds of freelancers. At this point, I would tell you that there’s three main reasons that people want to become freelancers, number one to make more money, right. That’s the

It’s called the side hustle for a reason. Most people start out doing side hustle work, then they find out they can do

make a lot more money doing it and they just try to transition to full time work. The other reason people become freelancers is to have a more flexible work schedule. They don’t like that eight to five job. They just want to work whenever they feel like working, and then also to fulfill their life’s purpose. A lot of people want to align their life purpose with their work, purpose. Okay.

So now on the flip side of that, let’s talk about why companies hire freelancers in the first place. Well, it’s getting more and more popular as you know, the gig economy is growing quite a bit. The first reason why companies hire freelancers and this is a no order. But the first reason I want to discuss is that because there are advances in neuroscience that have been shown that productivity and focus from employees for eight straight hours, you know, eight to 524, whatever the typical workday is, I don’t even know any more external. I don’t work eight to five but

It’s it’s very hard to keep your focus for eight straight hours advances in neuroscience have now confirmed that and productivity and focus wise is just your body is just not designed to work for eight straight hours. So they like a companies like the efficiency of hiring a freelancer for a few hours here and there, or whenever they need them. Another one is specialization. So a lot of times when you hire employees, especially in the startup you do that that employee will do multiple things or where we’re, quote unquote multiple hats. Okay.

freelancers, though, specialize or should specialize in one or two very specific skills. For example, I’m a marketing strategist, and I work with small businesses. So that is my niche skill and more specifically, b2c companies. That is a very niche skill. So there might be a lawyer out there that wants to be working for various companies as a freelancer, and he has

A very specific set of legal skills where you can

be hired by a very specific

company to do very specific thing. Usually employees are more general. And another reason is, companies like to hire freelancers, because the laws especially out here, where I’m at in California, the laws are just getting crazy for carrying employees. It’s expensive. It’s difficult to keep up with it. Even small businesses now with less than five employees are starting to hire HR managers to keep up with everything. I know when I registered my business license as an S corp, I got pounded with email or without with email with with actual mail, physical mail, by what’s called the Employment Development Department, giving me all these offered. I have to go see these seminars about employee hiring and firing and then how to end process and how to pay taxes. It’s like you need you need to hire somebody just to manage who you hired. I mean, it’s just crazy. So hiring freelancers is pretty cut and dry. You just hire somebody on Twitter.

contractor status, you get sent an invoice you pay it, you have no obligation.

We’re little obligation compared to employees in regards to laws. But thanks to California being sarcastic, the politicians are really trying hard to make freelancing very difficult. They just passed a law.

That is absurd. I won’t go into it on my soapbox now. But there’s even more laws and legislation that’s going to make freelancing very, very difficult. No one’s really stepping up for the voice of the freelancers. So it’s a problem. And politicians aren’t entrepreneurs. They don’t get it. They just see that we generate money and they want some of that money. So to them, it’s legal to me it’s criminal. I’ve already paid enough in taxes, especially out here in California, but again, won’t get on my soapbox. That’ll be a podcast for another day.

Why hire a freelancing train freelance training consultants? Well, you’ve heard of entrepreneur consultants. I’m one myself entrepreneur coach. But now lately I’ve been doing a lot of freelance training because

I own freelance masterclass. So, I boil my freelance training into three main avenues. One, I want to make you more money to, I want to get you a more flexible work schedule and three, I want to help you fulfill your life purpose, the same reasons why freelancers become freelancers, okay? They’re they’re aligned. fulfilling your life’s purpose is very important. I mean, if you have to think about yourself, it’s kind of a morbid exercise. But if you’re at your own funeral, what do you want people to say about you? You know, that’s that’s your life purpose you that you pay your bills on time? Yeah, that that Greg, he was Bill paying son of a bitch. Boy, that guy can pay bills. That didn’t seem very important, right? What is your life purpose? If you don’t know yet, which is fine. You just got to think about it. It takes some time. It took me it really took me months to understand what made me happy from a work and

life purpose. But once they’re aligned, I mean, my goal right now is to get as much people to work for themselves and make their own money. Nothing could be more fulfilling than that.

me teaching people how to do that. So determine what your life purpose is.

So let’s say you’re evaluating some freelance training consultants to hire. What questions did you ask? Well, you need to answer the following questions. How much experiences is Freelancer have training other people? or other freelancers? Does this Freelancer have a good reputation online and the reason why I say that is because a lot of times there’s there’s a lot of freelance training consultants out there that are just that sell themselves they outright lie. There’s one in particular has a website. I won’t mention his name because he I know he listens to this. But he is just he just flat out light right lies about the money he makes through his website and selling his courses and stuff.

And, and he he takes money from freelancers and he pretends to coach them, it gives him very generic advice is terrible, but he he has he he goes out of his way to delete that is bad reputation online. You can’t

That much about them. So, go do a deep search by this person’s name. And try to find if you’re evaluating somebody for a training consultant. Really look on social media, Google, all the all the social media sites, you can okay Facebook, ask also ask them. Is there a formal training process in place? Meaning do they just wing it when you get on the call with them? Hey, what do you want to talk about today? That’s not a training consultant. Okay, that a training consultant should have a specific agenda for you based on your goals. Another one, number four, will this Freelancer give me personal attention?

We’ll talk about group sessions in a minute, but everybody’s different. Everybody’s got different goals or he’s got different work habits. Everyone’s got different pain points. So the freelancer, that the freelancing training consultant that you hire, should be able to work with you one on one.

And then does this Freelancer have a lot of press and this is important because if people are willing to write about this training consultant as an expert, then he or she must be

an authority on the same subject on some subjects. In most cases, like, for example, I personally had been in, I would say, at least over 100, media outlets, podcast news stations, there’s I’m getting a lot of what’s called earned media now people are coming to me. I’ve had

media call me the king of freelancing. I’m not sure who did that. It’s a cool title. I’m not sure I want to be the king of freelancing, but it is what it is. But if people are talking about that person, and giving them accolades on a mass scale, then that’s probably an indicator that it’s a good consultant.

And another question is, do I truly believe I can make my money back, you know, listen to a little man inside of you. What does that little man say? When you pay this consultant money? Will you get that money because this is not an expense, you should consider this as an investment. All right. So if you pay this consultant 1000 or 10,000, will you see that money back in return through increased business or whatever you’re paying for?

point is that it’s going to be

helping to achieve. Okay. Now, one of the last slides here is what questions should you ask? This means directly asked them? How much experience do you have as a freelancer? Okay. Now, what I want you to do here as opposed to last question, the last questions are more objective, this is an actual measurable

scale. So when you ask them how much experience you have as a freelancer, you should be able to

rate that from one to 10. So one being not a good answer. 10 being good answer. What you want to do is, there’s 10 questions here. If they are between 70 and 80, or even below an 80 you don’t want to hire them at all if they’re between 80 and 90 could be okay, you probably want to keep evaluating other training consultants 19 above that means just go for it. You guys are a good match. So ask them how much experience they have as a freelancer they just run right to coaching, right to training. They don’t they don’t know what it’s like to be in the trenches. Okay. Another question is asking

Take me through the steps in the process on how you like to develop a freelancers career, you know, they should have a specific agenda. Another question, what would I expect to be accomplished after working with you for three months? If they can’t answer that, then they don’t know. And if they don’t know, then you shouldn’t expect very much results. Another question is, what were your biggest failures? as a freelancer? Every Freelancer has failures no matter how good or how smart you are, if they don’t know what their failures are, then they haven’t learned from them. All right, that’s important.

Another one, what are the common attributes of Freelancer like me would need to have to double their freelancing rate or more triple quadruple, they should know what kind of attributes that you need. If they don’t know then they can’t help you increase your rate. They don’t they’re just shooting in the dark. Okay. Another question. What are some obstacles I should face as a freelancer and how would you help me overcome them?

That’s important.

Now the question, will you be working together with me one on one, we just discussed that. It’s it’s okay to be in group sessions, but you should be able to get some personal attention. Another question number eight, what is your main expertise? And how do you charge clients? Do you charge clients hourly and flat rate? I’m not talking about charging you being the client, as a student. I’m talking about them as a freelancer, how do they charge their clients it should be aligned with how you charge? If they don’t if they’ve never charged hourly before and you plan on charging hourly, they won’t understand the pitfalls and all the the goods and bads that come with charging hourly. Okay, number nine, an important question. Do you have a refund policy in place? That’s important. What if you don’t like what they’re doing? Can you get your money back? What if they, they made all these promises like yeah, I’ll return all my emails within a day and then they go three or four days without returning email consistently, or they miss meetings, asked for a refund. Okay, have a written refund policy. And the last question

I would recommend and again, you’re going to write these all from one to 10. Each individual question is do you work in a particular industry? Now, this is important because if a freelancer works in the b2b industry, business to business and you plan on working B to C industry, business, business to consumer, or even the big business to government, you want to make sure you’re aligned. You don’t want to hire a freelance freelance training consultant, if they only have experience in b2b and you’re working b2c, there’s idiosyncrasies there that you have to know and they cannot train you on how to overcome that. So my the last slide I’d like to talk to you about today is our group sessions. Okay? Yes, the reasons why they do group sessions because you know, as a training consultant, or even as a freelancer, your your time is your money and there’s only so many students you can help over a eight or 10 hour work day, okay? So me myself, I do group sessions because I want to help more than 10 people in a day if I choose to work 10 hours, which I rarely if ever do so.

I want to be able to help 100 people a day. So I help group, I hold group sessions because there’s a lot of common issues that come up.

Every day, I get the same issues at from a freelancer, there’s commonality and then we could do ask me any things we can happen guest speakers, you know, there’s a lot of different things that we can do where you’ll still get the value being in the group, but you’ll get that one on one attention to me with me if you do one on one session. So we have group sessions and one on one sessions. But make sure there’s a nice mix of both, okay, don’t just do the group sessions only and then not expect one want to do any one on one sessions if you want personal attention. Okay, so, how and why to hire a freelance training consultant. There’s your ticket, take this advice and run with it. Good luck. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

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What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant As a freelance training consultant, I am happy as to the worldwide spread of the gig economy. The gig economy comprises of freelancers and it’s growing, and it’s growing fast. A new study confirms the rapid development of the global Gig Economy, projecting double-digit annual … What to Look for When Hiring a Freelance Training Consultant Read More » Mike Volkin 14:01
How to Start a Profitable Freelance Business https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-start-a-profitable-freelance-business/ Thu, 19 Dec 2019 16:38:31 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6878 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-start-a-profitable-freelance-business/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-start-a-profitable-freelance-business/feed/ 0 Want to know how to start a profitable freelance business but don’t know where to start? It’s actually easier than you think. In this blog, I will outline some of the tasks you need to do to get your freelance business in order. Freelancing is a series of many processes. You can’t hit the jackpot …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-start-a-profitable-freelance-business/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Start a Profitable Freelance Business</span> Read More »</a></p> Want to know how to start a profitable freelance business but don’t know where to start? It’s actually easier than you think. In this blog, I will outline some of the tasks you need to do to get your freelance business in order.
Freelancing is a series of many processes. You can’t hit the jackpot right away. Being a successful freelancer takes a while. I’m a full-time freelancer, and I encourage everyone to be full-time freelancers as well. If you want to make your freelancing business a quick hit, here are some wisdom nuggets to help you:

Take it Easy

Don’t freak out if you’re going to be working for and by yourself. Lots of people do it, and it’s easily achievable. In the freelancing world, the internet is your best friend. As long as you have access to the internet, you can start looking for clients.

Get an Upwork Profile

Start your freelancing career by getting an Upwork profile. Upwork is a top freelancing platform where you can apply to jobs and get yourself noticed by hundreds of companies around the world. It’s essential to make your profile a standout from the sea of freelancers.

In Freelancer Masterclass, I discuss how to separate yourself from the competition. If you want to learn how to stand out from the crowd, go ahead and join Freelancer Masterclass.
Once you have an Upwork account, fill out your profile completely. Get a great picture, develop a great headline, and get positive feedback from your clients.

Create Social Media Accounts

Get connected with your friends and acquaintances in the social media and tell them that you are accepting freelance jobs. Word of caution: If you haven’t quit your job yet, don’t post anything on LinkedIn. If you do, your boss might see your posts, which could lead you to trouble.

You need to know how much you will charge and what services can you offer. There are ways to calculate your rate. The easiest way is taking your yearly salary and subtract three zeros. So, if your annual salary is $60,000, then you subtract three zeros, a rate of $60/hour is your ideal price.

The next question is, what will you do? Are you going to do design work? Are you going to be a graphic designer? A musician? Try to be as detailed as you can about the services that you can offer. With that, don’t just say, I’m going to do design work. But are you going to do Photoshop, trade show design, or logo design? Who’s your ideal customer? Who would you like to attract as your customer? Having a specific niche will help you attract the right client for your skills.

Do Networking

I know that many people hate networking. Honestly, I’m not a big fan of it either. But knowing how effective networking is for my business, I make it a goal to connect with 25 people on LinkedIn everyday. That should be your goal too! Once you identify who your ideal client is, you should search for them on LinkedIn and send a little connection request. You have to fill in that message for the connection request to make it meaningful. Don’t just click the connect button like crazy.

Update Your Social Media Post

Start posting content because once you make connections, your network will start seeing your content on their wall. Post across all social network short blogs, snippets, video, tips and tricks, and other content. I did “Tips of the Day” on my previous company’s social media page and it attracted a lot of traffic. Suddenly, my followers skyrocketed because of these tips. Well, nobody likes reading long blog posts on social media pages. People on-the-go have no time reading them. So, stick with “less is more” approach when posting content on social media.

Create a Partnership

Look for people who need your service based on your skillset. For instance, if you’re a Search Engine Optimization (SEO) specialist, people who are into building or editing websites might need your expertise. What you can do is search for website development companies and offer your service. That’s how you create partnerships, and you should provide them an excellent value to start a good relationship.

You should handpick people you want to work for. Choose those whose profession is almost the same as yours. Then write them a personal message. If you can find some commonality between you and your prospects, that’s better. You want to connect to them on a personal level and offer them something of value.

If you want to dip your toes in the freelance water, be ready to face many challenges. But there are many ways to get you started. Creating an online presence and building a network can help you find your first client. From there, don’t stop prospecting if you want to grow your freelancing career.

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Want to know how to start a profitable freelance business but don’t know where to start? It’s actually easier than you think. In this blog, I will outline some of the tasks you need to do to get your freelance business in order. Want to know how to start a profitable freelance business but don’t know where to start? It’s actually easier than you think. In this blog, I will outline some of the tasks you need to do to get your freelance business in order. Freelancing is a series of many processes. You can’t hit the jackpot … How to Start a Profitable Freelance Business Read More » Mike Volkin 7:59
Creative Visualization-My Secret Tool for Success That is Completely Free https://freelancermasterclass.com/creative-visualization-my-secret-tool-for-success-that-is-completely-free/ Tue, 17 Dec 2019 16:18:44 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6832 https://freelancermasterclass.com/creative-visualization-my-secret-tool-for-success-that-is-completely-free/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/creative-visualization-my-secret-tool-for-success-that-is-completely-free/feed/ 0 Creative visualization is a powerful weapon every entrepreneur should utilize. Let me show you what it is and how to do it the right way to increase the likelihood you will reach your goals. ———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/creative-visualization-my-secret-tool-for-success-that-is-completely-free/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Creative Visualization-My Secret Tool for Success That is Completely Free</span> Read More »</a></p> Creative visualization is a powerful weapon every entrepreneur should utilize. Let me show you what it is and how to do it the right way to increase the likelihood you will reach your goals.

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone.

Welcome to another episode of freelancers school. I am Mike volken. And today we’re going to be discussing my secret tool for success that is completely free. It is a tool that anyone can use. It is a tool that you can utilize anywhere. And it is a tool that is extremely effective. Now, for many of you who have listened to my videos and my podcast, you’ll know that I like to meditate even if it’s just a few hours a day, but that is not the tool of success I’m going to be discussing today although that is important. What I’m going to be discussing today is something that you can do right now after you stop listening to this podcast and start reap the benefits of this tool. This tool is called creative visualization. Now for many of you, you’ve already kind of discounted it saying, Oh, that’s hokey, pokey hippie stuff. But it has come a long way. In the last few years, there’s been a lot of research that has been done. And given all the tools and instruments and scientific approaches, we’re now able to prove that this works. It’s how it works, with the varying level of success is how you apply it. So not only am I going to tell you what creative visualization is, I’m going to give you a six step process for success. Now, in all full disclosure, I do this daily, I want to give you what my results are early, and why I’m so excited to teach it to you. But I am still a very, very much a beginner. In fact, I just ordered my second and third book, I read one book on this and I’ve you know, read some blog articles, did some podcasts, research and whatnot, but I’m still very much a beginner and I’ll admit that I’m not an expert. I’m not going to teach you advanced tactics, but you don’t need advanced tactics. In order to make this very effective for you, so let me tell you my story. About three or four months ago I read a book called Psycho Cybernetics. It’s by an author named Maxwell maltz. Now, before this book, I knew creative visualization as a theory, right? But the book actually explained it not only what it is, why it’s effective, but then how to go about doing it effectively. Now, my story is this. Once I finished reading the book, I started applying creative visualization for a couple weeks. What I was visualizing wasn’t better relationships. It wasn’t being a better entrepreneur is actually being a better tennis player. Those of you that know me know that I love tennis. It’s my passion. And it was in the middle of tennis season, and I had some important matches coming up. So I figured what the heck. Let’s go ahead and try some of these techniques. So I started visualizing myself playing better tennis. I started watching myself play tennis as if I was watching a movie. I started picture Myself winning, not just matches but points I started feeling those emotions of me winning, I started feeling the emotion of me picking spots in the court and hitting it. I started feeling perfect technique I started feeling fast feet and slow hands, which is a common technique and strategy to use in tennis. I also started picturing more than just matches it’s practice as well because I spend much more time practicing then to do playing matches. So when I practice my serves, I would practice visualizing before I went out and actually took my bucket of balls out to the court, I would visualize myself hitting perfect serves, aiming and hitting my spots and feeling the intensity of hitting the exact spot that I wanted to hit. So I did notice a change, a small change but not very noticeable at first. And as I started doing it, more and more, I started noticing my practices getting much more effective, and and intense. So when it came to be the first match, I played And this is a 100% True story. I was scheduled to play singles because I’m a singles player against a player who was pretty much my skill set, maybe a little bit below me, I probably would have won anyway without this creative visualization technique, but he was by and large, a good player. He was competitive, athletic, knew the game, etc, etc. I had actually never played him before I traveled about 45 minutes to get to a tennis club with my team to play singles with this person. And as soon as the match started, I felt this intensity I’ve never felt before I felt this connection with my brain and my body that was immediately evident and gave me extreme confidence. Now normally when I do in a match, it’s fairly close, you know, it might go three sets and might go to but you know, it’s competitive because we’re all in a league and the leagues are matched up with skill level. So it’s very rare in this league to have a better blowout type of match, but I won this match what’s called double bangle. Okay, it’s 6060 the person did not get one set for me one game for me, actually. So I walked off the court and I just started thinking, wow, is it in a coincidence that I’ve won my first match 6060 and over a decade, and I just started doing these creative visualization techniques. Now, please don’t mistake what I’ve been doing as a lot of work. I’m talking about 15 minutes a day, for maybe 10 to 14 days before I played this match. It wasn’t like it was an extreme amount of work. This was just me visualizing myself connecting with the ball, hitting my spots and being intense about and feeling the love of winning.

The other person was so upset. They ran off the court after the match complaining to the team captain that I was placed in the wrong League. He thought I was what’s called a ringer, which is someone who belongs in a higher league but just played down in order to get a win, but that’s not The case at all I was just playing out of my mind good. I was serving Well, I was approaching the net Well, I was hitting volleys. Well, I was doing everything well. And I made very few unforced errors and had a lot of winners, I was just beating him on every aspect of the court. And that’s why I won 6060. Now, I’ve been ramping up my creative visualization techniques. And, and yes, I’ve played matches since then, and not 16060. But it took me to that next level already. So I’m at the point now, where I’m going to be doing more than just 15 minutes a day and expanding it out to other aspects of my life. I’m going to creatively visualize what it’s like to be a great entrepreneur, creatively visualize what it’s going to be like to improve relationships, all sorts of relationships. When you say relationship, it doesn’t just have to be between a husband and wife or boyfriend or girlfriend, it could be with your son or daughter could be with a co worker, whatever. So let me tell you a little bit about how to approach creative visualization because this is very, very powerful. Please don’t underestimate Or, you know, shoot this away as just some kind of podcast you just listened to, but you’re not gonna practice. Please give me a commitment that you’re going to do this for just a week 10 to 15 minutes a day. And I promise you, you’re going to write me an email, and thank me. And then in addition to getting what you want, through creative visualization, you’re actually helping some other aspects of your life as well. There’s other benefits, there’s reduce stress, there’s increased focus, there’s a gain of self confidence. There’s the aspect of it bringing joy, and it provides inspiration. So let’s get down to it. How do you do creative visualization now we can get more advanced in each one of these steps. I want to give you the overall outer workings of it just so you can get started today. Step one, set the mood. Okay, be in a relaxed and positive state when you attempt to create a visualization, so don’t just sit down, close your eyes and start visualizing. All right. What I like to do and I like to focus on 10 deep breaths inward and outward. This should only take a minute but gets you in the right mindset. All right, and of course, it should be in a quiet room and no distractions. I like to turn on the light but it’s not necessary, it’s not required. And what I also like to do is don’t kick your feet up and don’t lay on the bed you should be in an active seating position, meaning your feet is on the floor, your hands on your, on your thighs, and just sitting straight up. Okay, if you’re to relax, it’s not going to work as well because you want your mind active. Alright, step number two, visualize your goal. Now depending on what your goal is, my goal was playing better tennis, your goal could be anything you can possibly dream up. But once your mind feels still and receptive from step one, I want you to start crafting an image of the things you want. I want you to visually picture it, taking as long as you like to build up all of the details. The more detailed it is, the better the surroundings, how you feel, when it’s happening, how you feel after it’s happening. Now, if your visit realization is money. Don’t just picture yourself holding, you know a handful of money and waving it in the air. Picture yourself, how you feel and how you got that money. All right, I want you to take it as detailed as possible. Step three, hold on to the feeling associated with your visualization. Although the most important part of creative visualization is the process described here, you are more likely to see your goals manifest in your life. If you allow your visualization experience to influence the rest of your day. I want you to try to hold on to that feeling of, of happiness, the feeling of pride, the feeling of peace, the feeling of confidence that you experience when you picture your goal. You’re repeatedly affirming that your belief will soon attract the things that you desire. And it works. I know it sounds hokey, but it absolutely will Step four, what I want you to do is make a habit of using creative visualization. I had this problem the first few days I was doing it, I was trying to squeeze it into my already busy day, which didn’t work. So what I did was I scheduled some time on my calendar for myself, I scheduled a half an hour even though I only needed 15 minutes that gave me some time to go a little bit late for meeting prior or schedule some time for a meeting coming up a little bit in advance, but they gave me a good 15 minute window to go ahead and do it on a daily basis.

Step five, work hard to achieve your goal. Now, although creative visualization is incredibly powerful, and can certainly play a huge role in allowing you to develop the life that you’ve wanted, you substantially increase your chances of success if you also make concrete steps towards that goal. So think of it like going to the gym, some of you go to the gym to get big muscles. Some of you go to the gym to lose weight, whatever the case, you don’t just achieve your weight loss goal or mass goal by going occasionally or going when you feel like it. Alright, there’s a regimen there, you have to schedule and make time to do it. And I like to do at a consistent time each day, you might find that your time is in the early morning, which is mine later, right before I start work, you might find that it’s right before you go to bed. I like to do mine in the morning because it gives me the rest of the day to kind of reflect on my creative visualization exercise, find your own time, you’ll find that there’s a time that fits best for you and it’s usually at a certain time of day. I hope this was eye opening for you and for you non believers. Please go ahead and just give it a try. Three days to a week. Do it every day for 10 to 15 minutes and then report back to me and let me know what you think. Good.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Creative visualization is a powerful weapon every entrepreneur should utilize. Let me show you what it is and how to do it the right way to increase the likelihood you will reach your goals. —————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————... Creative visualization is a powerful weapon every entrepreneur should utilize. Let me show you what it is and how to do it the right way to increase the likelihood you will reach your goals. ———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by … Creative Visualization-My Secret Tool for Success That is Completely Free Read More » Mike Volkin clean 12:08
An Interview with Michael Zipursky of consulting success-How to Attract High-Value Clients https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-zipursky-of-consulting-success-how-to-attract-high-value-clients/ Tue, 10 Dec 2019 16:40:31 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6732 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-zipursky-of-consulting-success-how-to-attract-high-value-clients/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-zipursky-of-consulting-success-how-to-attract-high-value-clients/feed/ 0 Want to know how to attract high-value clients? Michael Zipursky is the CEO of Consulting Success and Coach to Consultants. He has advised organizations like Financial Times, Dow Jones, and others and helped Panasonic launch new products into global markets, but more importantly, he’s helped over 300 consultants from around the world in over 50 …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-zipursky-of-consulting-success-how-to-attract-high-value-clients/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview with Michael Zipursky of consulting success-How to Attract High-Value Clients</span> Read More »</a></p> Want to know how to attract high-value clients? Michael Zipursky is the CEO of Consulting Success and Coach to Consultants. He has advised organizations like Financial Times, Dow Jones, and others and helped Panasonic launch new products into global markets, but more importantly, he’s helped over 300 consultants from around the world in over 50 industries add six and seven figures to their annual revenues. Over 34,000 consultants read his weekly consulting newsletter. Michael is also the author of the Amazon Best Sellers “The Elite Consulting Mind” and the book Consulting Success. You can get Michaels Free 47-Page Consulting Blueprint on his website.

Show Notes
Questions

I’ve heard you mention on your podcast that an entrepreneur can achieve greater success by subtraction than addition, can you explain that?
What is the only thing that is holding literally anybody back from being a successful consultant or freelancer?
How do you develop offers that align and resonate with your ideal clients?
How can you structure a marketing system to help you attract high-value clients?
How can freelancers and consultants use ROI positioning to increase their fees significantly?
Where can our audience learn more about you?


Raw Transcript:

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Alright everybody, thanks for joining us today a freelancer school and I am Mike Volkin lead instructor Freelancer masterclass Today we have with us, Michaels The burski is the CEO of consulting success and coach two consultants he has advised organizations like the Financial Times Dow Jones and others and he’s helped Panasonic launch new products into global markets. But more importantly, he’s helped over 300 consultants from around the world in over 50 Industries and even add six and seven figures to their annual revenues and he has over 34,000 consultants read his weekly consulting newsletter. He’s the author of the best selling books like the elite consulting mind and the book called coaching success. And I believe Michael even offers a 47 page Consulting Group blueprint on his website. Is that right, Michael?

Yeah. And the book is consulting success, same as a website,

consulting success, calm

and welcome to the show. Thanks. Good to be with you.

So I’ve heard you mentioned on your podcast that an entrepreneur can achieve greater success by subtraction than addition. Can you explain this to our audience? Because I think it’s really interesting what you said,

There, I think, you know, today more than ever, we have options and there’s lots of different ways to to try to grow a business there’s lots of different information it’s all surrounding us. And so what a lot of entrepreneurs think about is, you know, in order to grow, we need to add more, we need to do more, we need to put on more you know, put up more products or offer more services. And, in my experience, my observation that’s exactly the exact opposite that by subtracting by taking away different offerings by taking a different products by removing complex Moving towards simplicity. And actually, in fact, if you study the most successful companies of our times, most of them got started by being very focused. It was only later on once they achieved a certain level of traction and success. So they then start to add additional offerings. And so even though you might believe that you need to have more to grow, in fact, if you get more focused at the early stages, especially it allows you to see greater results faster.

Yeah, when you mentioned that’s a good point, when you mentioned the companies that have started off really small and then niched out I immediately thought of Amazon, right. So it wasn’t too long ago when they only offered books. It’s like decimated the book industry, Barnes and Nobles borders all went down or a fraction of what they were. And now they’re just there is nothing that Amazon won’t sell now with success, and they’ve got their own delivery. You know, they deliver their own packages now throughout the world, and it’s just amazing. So,

yeah, I mean, if I’m in exactly your point, if Amazon tried to launch, you know, everything they have today at the early stages, there’s no way that they would have gotten any traction because It would have been just even not economical to do that.

Now, do you think the reason for that is because of the the marketing is too general? Or do you think it’s probably the the operation from an operational standpoint, it’s difficult to scale something. And so with so many different industries and products and services, or maybe a combination of the two, is there one or the other? That’s more important?

I think you hit on the head there, Mike is it’s definitely both right. So if you are trying to offer different things to different people at the early stages, that makes it very hard to to be focused, which means you have to have different messages, you know, different groups, and at the early stages, that’s very challenging to manage. But on top of that, right, there’s actually the physical management of all of that. And so most of us feel, you know, stretched at times, right? We feel overwhelmed, and especially for trying to consume most information that’s confronting us right now on on, you know, online. And so by removing that, and getting very fortunate when I say a lot of people is listen, if you want to have a seven figure business as an example, let’s just say you want to reach that one. million dollar market so many people, you know, think is kind of like the best place to be everyone’s working towards 1 million, well, you don’t need to have five or six different offerings to do that you can get there with two or three offerings a maximum, you don’t have to have anything more than that. I’ve seen it over and over again. And so you know, people are trying to create a lot of complexity by having you know, they’re doing speaking from the get go and they’re offering webinars and books and products, and they’re doing 10 different things and they think they have to have all these different service offerings. So you go to their website, it’s just a big list of stuff. That’s confusion because when you go to talk to someone I say, what do you do you don’t even know what to say? Because you offer too many different things I’m being very focusing This is exactly what who I help this is how I help them this is the result that help them to achieve with the problem that help them to solve it becomes much easier to have that conversation

so true early on and Freelancer masterclass module two of 10 we talk about elevator pitches and unique selling propositions because that is a foundation for everything if you don’t know how to say, you know, I get the typical Freelancer like what do you do? Oh, I help companies scale Well, what does that mean? There’s so much that like, can you and I keep telling people, you can’t niche down far enough. There’s so much money to be made out there. I mean, you can pick a niche of a niche of a niche, and it’s still be a multimillion dollar opportunity for you just have to be able to execute it. Right, exactly. So what is the only thing that is holding freelancers and consultants back? I don’t wanna say the only but what’s the major thing that you see talking all these consultants? what’s what’s the big tie in? that’s holding them all back?

Yeah, universally. It’s I mean, this is across all businesses, and for all entrepreneurs, and certainly consultants and freelancers. It’s mindset, right? That’s the biggest thing that holds all of us back is what’s kind of between our ears. And so people often think that it’s something else. They think, Oh, no, I don’t have enough money. I don’t have enough resources. I don’t have enough skills. I don’t have the tools. I don’t have all the automations right. And so we’re looking at all these external things that we don’t have that are holding us back. And in fact, it’s none of that right. Most of us actually know what we need to do. Most of us have studied enough we’ve, you know, read the books. We’ve Get it done whatever it is. And so what’s not what’s holding us back is not our lack of knowledge. It’s our lack of implementation. Yeah. And that lack of implementation comes from our minds that comes from our beliefs and the fears that we have. And so in order to see greater results, you got to push, you know, push past that you need to look at, really, what are the beliefs that you have what’s, what are your limiting beliefs, and then figure out what you need to do to start making progress to overcome them?

Yeah, you’re speaking my language. I’m into creative visualization right now. It’s my new thing. And I’m reading a book called The power of neuro plasticity. And it talks about now that we have the ability to measure human brains like we never have before in last few years, they can actually show you how much power you have to re actually rewire in your brain. And your brain has way more power than we ever thought was possible. And you had mentioned beliefs. And I probably would have stated the lack of beliefs, but either way, we’re talking about the same thing, the power for you to believe and even just for five or 10 minutes a day do creative visualization does amazing thing. Things and I’m gonna tennis player. And when I started doing creative visualization after two weeks, I won one of my competitive tennis matches 6060 in my league person didn’t win a game, he went to go complain to the other coach that I was in the wrong league. And it would have been a match that would have been very close. But I, I believed I could win. I visualized myself winning and hitting perfect strokes and having great techniques. And I just I crushed it that day. And ever since then, I’ve been hooked on creative visualization. So there’s more power to to, to the mind. And you think so?

Yeah, it’s very true, about

you know, consultants and freelancers finding a niche and going after, but how do you develop an offer that that aligns and resonates with someone’s ideal client? What What’s it it’s not really it’s easier said than done? Right?

Yeah, I mean, it’s it’s a big challenge, right? Those those first two parts, when you’re starting your consulting or freelancing business, right, getting clear on what we call the your ideal client clarity, so really clear as to who your ideal client is, and the second part is developing a message that will get the attention interest of that ideal client right will really resonate with them they’ll respond to. And so in terms of how do you figure out an offering that’s going to, to work with those people or aligner as essentially what they want to buy. It’s all about having conversations, right. And this is where most people, they neglect this, or they don’t actually kind of lean into it, because they’re hesitant to have those conversations. They’re spending a lot of time building a bunch of stuff are working on their website, they’re working on their funnels, they’re working on their social media, they’re creating all the stuff that they think is going to help them solve the problem that that they believe that they have. But in fact, if they can solve that problem a lot easier by just going on having conversations with their ideal clients to find out what is the problem that you have right now? What are you looking to, you know, are you actually looking to invest in a solution, right, when you understand what it is that your client is going through right now or the you know, the person who you believe is your ideal client, and you have a conversation with them, you’ll very quickly be able to validate whether the hypotheses and the assumptions that you have are valid or not, right, too often, like I remember back in the day, my cousin Simon, who’s still my business partner to today, in a different business that we had we invested 20th was $21,000 building this product we believe the market wanted. And then we finally launched many months later. And we put we crammed every feature into that we had a bunch of developers working on all that kind of stuff. And then we found out when we launched it, like 95%, of what we had built, people didn’t want, they only want to 5% it would have saved us a lot of time, a lot of money, a lot of energy if we just actually asked the market earlier on. And so that’s always stuck with me. Now, this is, you know, 15 years later from from that point, but still today, it’s stuff that I counsel my clients on and those that we coach, because it’s so important to go and is validate to have that conversation. And so back your real question, Mike, how do you develop an offer that your ideal clients really want? Well, first of all, figure out who is your ideal client? And you don’t need to be 100% right with that, right? A lot of people believe that, Oh, I’m not going to go and have a conversation until actually know exactly who my ideal client is. But the truth is that clarity around your ideal client and your messaging, those evolve over time, right who your ideal client is today and your messaging, the way it is today is not going to be the way that is in years from now potential that’s going to change in my or yours going forward. So you just need a starting point. So decided, who do you believe is your ideal client? What do you believe is the message that will resonate with them right the base of the problems they have, and so forth. And then get in front of them, get some introduction, get some referrals, do hustle, like figure out some ways to get some conversations going. And then ask them questions so that you can truly validate whether or not what you believe the you know, the problem they have is actually the problem and what kind of solution would be the right fit for them. And once you do that, then the whole sales process becomes a lot easier because you get to just sell if you want to buy

Yes, yes. Don’t assume that’s very good. Don’t assume what they want. I have a failed business. And I think that’s what makes us stronger as an entrepreneurs kind of failing a couple of times, but I wasted almost $60,000, building a company, realizing that I was building the wrong solution all along and I got all the way down to the nitty gritty of the features. And when I launched it, I realized, oops, I should have done 5% of this. So but that didn’t make me stronger. And that’s all about the buzzword. Growth Hacking is you know, going out there finding what they want building a quickest, easiest solution you can just to validate some business model and then building it out from there. But how do you structure a marketing system? Once you have that, that plan in place like and you know, what you want, who you want to attract? And how you can attract them? How do you structure a marketing system from that point?

So the first thing I’ll say is that it’s gonna depend on on who your ideal clients are and what market you’re in. Right. So my world is consulting our clients work with organizations, whether for profit or nonprofit, whether, you know, they’re funded startups, or they’re, you know, multi billion dollar organizations. But that’s the world that I’m more familiar with. So I’ll just kind of speak to that because I think it’s important that people recognize that it’s one way of marketing is not necessarily the right way of marketing for different industry. Right. So if you’re, if you’re selling socks, or, you know, pokey bowls or whatever, it’s gonna be different. But in the sense of if you’re consulting or you’re providing advice and kind of strategic directions to people, it’s all about relationships, right? This is where I see a lot of people going wrong as they think about marketing is transactional. They spent a lot of time on trying to automate and get all the rights tools and everything in place without actually focusing on the relationships. So if we break this down and just kind of like step by step, a path that a lot people can take that works consistently is number one, right? Get clear on who your ideal client is then number two gold and actually connect with them. So you can use LinkedIn or different platforms to do that. But don’t do it. Like we all get. I’m sure you guys as well Mike, where someone connects with you. And right away, boom, that is spammy with like a big message of here’s what we do buy from us get our like, really, right, you would never do that in you never go to a networking event. Say Hi, my name is Michael, do you know, do you want to buy this thing that I have? Like, you would never do that? So why are you doing it online? Right, just because you can hide behind a screen. Act like a human being because you are human being it’s all about relationships, and especially when you’re selling valuable, you know, products or services, it’s not as a quick snap of the finger decision. Right? It’s you’re going to there’s a level of trust that needs to be in place, there’s a level of risk that is there as well. And so to overcome all that and to make sure that everything is in line, right, you need to have the relationship there. So once you connect with them once they accept that connection request, and even if they don’t, there’s other things you can do to start providing value to them, right and over time, you’re going to be in touch with them, you’re going to make sure that they understand what your value proposition is, and how you might be able to help them, you’re adding value, you’re staying in touch, you’re doing consistent follow up. And then a percentage of the marketplace is going to want exactly what you have, right? If you’ve done your job pretty quickly, but the majority won’t. And so that’s where follow up is really critical, right? continuing to get in front of those people delivering value delivering different messages, checking in following up right over a period of time, and you’re gonna be able to build a thriving pipeline by doing that, and where most people, you know, kind of fall down is they stop after one or two attempts to convert someone, they think, oh, as this transaction, I guess what I’m doing isn’t working because I reached out two or three times or I sent a couple of LinkedIn messages and it didn’t work. So I guess this, this whole thing doesn’t work. And then they abandon it, only to maybe, you know, recognize later on that. It’s actually all the follow up and everything that happens later on right over a longer period of time. That actually generates the vast majority of the sales.

Yeah, that’s so true. It’s so in the bigger the more popular the person is that you’re trying to reach the more following You should do like if you’re trying to reach CEOs or CMOS that are usually really busy at a company, you want to do more than just one or two LinkedIn messages. I mean, I might go so far as to say write a hand letter, handwritten letter and just mail it to them or a postcard saying, hey, trying to get your attention on LinkedIn, please respond, you’ll be surprised at how the stuff that isn’t so normal nowadays will get all the attention that you need. So yeah, you actually talked about ROI positioning on your website? Can you explain that a little bit because I think our freelancers that are listening to this are saying, Well, how can I increase my fees? Or my hourly rate or my project based and you talk about ROI positioning, which I think is is a great answer to this so please explain that.

Yeah, definitely. So I’m not a big fan of hourly fees, I believe there’s just just creates a ceiling and it’s it doesn’t work well for the client or or for the consultant or the freelancer in that case. So ROI positioning right is all about identifying the value in the ROI for the client. And by doing that, or the way that you do that is by having a conversation with with the buyer a meaningful conversation. So in our in our world, we call it a meaningful sales conversation. That conversation is all about digging deep into what the buyer cares most about. Right? A lot of people have what we call surface level conversations. So they’ll ask things like, you know, what do you want us to look like? And how do you want it to be? And it’s just surface level, but you’re not getting deep. And so a few examples of maybe kind of deeper level questions would be, you know, tell me about why this is so important to you, and what will things look like for you when this is in place? Right? How will that be different than today? If you don’t do this right now, then what happens? Let’s that’s called COI cost of inaction, right? If you stay where you are, right, and don’t change anything, what’s the impact on your business? How, what kind of results, you know, will you be able to generate when you have this new solution in place, so you’re digging a lot deeper into the real reasons for them to do this now as opposed to waiting. And you’re also starting to connect the value or the ROI that they can get by by doing this? And so it’s not just about hey, can you you know, come in and help us with our marketing and develop a marketing plan for us or develop a website for us now. Well, if you develop a marketing plan for us, how does that actually help the business? Oh, well, our goal is to add an extra, you know, $5 million in the next two years. Okay. And, you know, why is it so important for you to do right now? Well, we’re seeing a lot more competition, our you know, our competitors are starting grab some market share from us. And is that a concern for you? Yeah, that’s a big concern for us right now. We’ll tell me more about that. Why is that a big concern right now, as opposed to maybe it wasn’t a concern before? So it’s a real conversation, right? The way I like to describe it, Mike is it’s like an onion and you’re peeling back the layers of the onion to get to the core right to get to the center. And the more that you do that, then the more valuable that you become to that buyer. Number One reason is because you’re asking the questions that no one else is typically asked them, right, you’re getting to think about things that they haven’t necessarily thought about before, or they get a little light bulb moment or someone clicks and goes Oh, right, as they’re thinking to answer that question. Now, they feel a lot clearer. They feel a lot more kind of confident that you are someone that can help them so you’re demonstrating authority through that whole discussion, but most importantly, you’re moving the conversation from just investing into you know, into You as as an expense or a cost to an actual investment, right? It’s not they’re thinking about, yeah, I can put money in, but I can see how I’m going to get more money out from doing that. And most people are not happy about expenses or costs. But they’re a lot more excited about making an investment because they can see that there’s a greater return. That’s going to come from doing it. Yeah, like that. It’s also called value based pricing, right? ROI positioning. But so what would happen in this case? So let’s say somebody came to us with a marketing plan, somebody came to me with a marketing plan, right? And they said, our goal is to do $1 million. How would I price that when there’s somebody else out there that’s doing hourly, it says, Hey, I can do a marketing plan for you for $1,000 and I come in, I say, it’s gonna be 20,000. And I realize I’m asking all the right questions, and I’m and I’m showing them that I’m different and they like that, but that’s not enough. That’s too big of a gap there. You know. So, how would you deal with something like that, for example? Yes. Well, the first thing is to recognize that you don’t win the business. You shouldn’t try and win the business at the point of, you know, providing proposal or, or stating your fees. If you’re waiting to that point to try and win the business, then you’ve likely already lost. Right? So what what you should be thinking about is how do you actually start to create greater differentiation? How do you, you know, contribute and put out more value into the marketplace so that when someone approaches you, when you actually start to even have that conversation, they’re already seeing you differently than that hourly provider, right? They know there’s cheaper options out in that marketplace, they have a sense that you’re probably more expensive, they’re expecting that. And that happens, because they see you as an expert, whereas they see these other people. Like there’s a lot of marketing consultants out there. There’s a lot of web design developers out there, but summer are able to earn 10 and 20 times more than others. Why is that? Well, it’s because they have, you know, a better client list. They have a lot more thought leadership out there. Right. You know, you find them a lot easier online, you see them speaking, they have books on the subject, whatever it is, they’ve put in the work to create enough thought leadership or to put enough value into the marketplace so that when the client approaches them, they already know that they’re going to be, you know, a more expensive solution. So that’s part of it, right? But it’s also the conversation that you have because to the consultants are the three nonces go in and just say our hourly fee is whatever, $200 an hour. And this is what we do. Their conversation with the client is very different than the consultant or Freelancer that’s thinking a lot more about value and a lot more about ROI. And so if you’ve been able to navigate that conversation properly, by the end of that conversation, the the buyer will understand that yeah, this is a different type of person. Like we’ve gone a lot deeper. An example that I give Mike is, you know, imagine if you’re going to have your house painted, and you call it two different contractors to come over house painters. And one comes in, they kind of walk around and they give you a quote, yeah, it’s going to be 1500 dollars to paint your house, okay. And another person comes, and they’re walking around your house, and they go, Oh, you know, how long is this patch been like that for and? Okay, yeah, you see how this is peeling over here? Yeah. So this is why that’s happening. So it might cost a little bit more, but my suggestion actually would be to probably remove some of these areas, apply these two different layers of paint because it’s going to last you 10 years longer. You won’t need me again.

Yeah, exactly right. It’s like but even through that conversation, even though you you know, this gonna cost you more That pert, that second person will be more expensive. You feel a lot more trust and feel like yeah, this person actually is looking out for me. They’re they’re much more detailed and much more specific. There’s a lot more value happening in that conversation whether or not I actually go with them. But most people will end up going with them if they have the financial ability to do so because the value is there.

Right? Yeah, I love it. That’s great. And I think more freelancers should get away from hourly, because I’m constantly getting bombarded with what should I get charged per hour. It’s like why I mean, I just hired two content writers to write almost the same blog post blog post one was $60 more an hour, but the one who was cheaper got it done, like three times faster. I would have never known that because it’s such a terrible indicator of work output is the hourly rate, I have no idea how fast you can work or what the quality is. No, I can’t stand our hourly rates. But how can our audience find you online? I think you’ve got a lot of great ideas to share.

Yeah, definitely. So consulting, success, calm. And for those of you mentioned, we have a 47 page consulting blueprint they can get for free and they can get that a consulting success.com forward slash blueprint.

Cool. And what does that blueprint teach? Is it a step by step module or what is it

knows the blueprint pretty much goes through several different key kind of foundational areas that are critical to building a successful consulting business. So there’s a whole section in there around pricing. So we talked about ROI positioning, we talked about how to actually start attracting ideal clients and building out your marketing system. There’s information there, there’s actually a whole bunch of questions around the sales process. So it’s kind of like some of the key areas around consulting. And we go into those over the 47 pages. So there’s, there’s a lot of value in there that people can if they’re interested building a consulting business or taking their existing consulting business to the next level. I think it’ll be a good resource for nice.

Alright, well, I’ll link to your website so they can get that in the show notes. And thank you very much for joining. Let’s keep in touch in the future. Okay.

My pleasure, Mike. All right. Take care.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Want to know how to attract high-value clients? Michael Zipursky is the CEO of Consulting Success and Coach to Consultants. He has advised organizations like Financial Times, Dow Jones, and others and helped Panasonic launch new products into global ma... Want to know how to attract high-value clients? Michael Zipursky is the CEO of Consulting Success and Coach to Consultants. He has advised organizations like Financial Times, Dow Jones, and others and helped Panasonic launch new products into global markets, but more importantly, he’s helped over 300 consultants from around the world in over 50 … An Interview with Michael Zipursky of consulting success-How to Attract High-Value Clients Read More » Mike Volkin 22:02
Top 5 Tools Freelancers Should Be Paying For https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-5-tools-for-freelancers/ Tue, 10 Dec 2019 15:56:25 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6729 https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-5-tools-for-freelancers/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-5-tools-for-freelancers/feed/ 0 Who doesn’t like freelancer tools!? In today’s episode, we talk about the latest freelancer tools and resources you can use to make their day more efficient. One of the best ways to help you grow your freelancing career is to invest on tools and resources that help manage your day-to-day workload. These freelancer tools help …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-5-tools-for-freelancers/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Top 5 Tools Freelancers Should Be Paying For</span> Read More »</a></p> Who doesn’t like freelancer tools!? In today’s episode, we talk about the latest freelancer tools and resources you can use to make their day more efficient.


One of the best ways to help you grow your freelancing career is to invest on tools and resources that help manage your day-to-day workload. These freelancer tools help you do your work faster and more efficient. If you need to pay for these tools, by all means, go ahead.  To help you make a wise return for your money, here are the top five freelancer tools that you should be paying for.

1. Project Management App

A project management app is handy in scheduling your priorities, setting reminders and deadlines, assigning tasks, and communicating relevant information to your team and clients. I like using Teamwork, but there are other platforms like Monday, Asana, Function, Fox, and other software that allow you to enter tasks for your team and managing your own.

Signing up for a project management app is very useful even if you don’t have an agency. It helps you organize the clutter in your head and put them into writing. This way, you can present to your client what tasks you are currently working on and when they are due. You can give your clients access to the app to let them see the drafts subject for final approval.

2. Video Screening Recording

I’m using loom, a video sharing app that allows me to capture my screen, voice, and face and share the video to my client or members of my team in an instant. Aside from loom, you can also check out Drift, another video-sharing app with live chat capability for half of loom’s price.

3. Upwork Premium Account

At least 30% of my business come from Upwork. Based on my experience, there are many definite benefits that you get from signing up with Upwork Plus. I cannot mention all of them here because it probably warrants a whole blog on their own. But if you are interested, you can click the link here to learn more about the program.

Other freelancing websites have their upgraded versions, too. If you are a client or a freelancer who uses Freelancer.com, Guru, Upwork, or other platforms, you should look into getting an upgraded account. They are designed to save you money, making money, or save you time.

4. Alternative Payment Options

If you dread paying extra for credit card fees, then look for alternative payment options like PayPal. With PayPal, clients run up their credit cards, and the freelancer gets charged for the transaction fee, usually around 2.9% of the entire amount. If you’re a freelancer, you should treat the transaction fee as another cost for doing business on your end. Don’t charge it to your client.

A lot of freelancers ask their clients to do wire transfers or ACS transfers, which are more complicated. The clients have to go to the bank, fill out a form, scan it, and send it back to you. The whole process is time-consuming on their part.

I had a job interview before, and the prospect asked me how I would like to receive the payment. I told the client that he could use his credit card to pay me, and I would take care of the transaction fees. I got the project over another freelancer who asked him to do a wire transfer. Why? Because I’m saving his precious time from doing wire transfers. Also, my client gets airline miles, cashback, and other perks every time he uses his credit card to pay me.

5. Scheduling Platforms

I’m using Calendly, but there are similar apps, including SimplyBook.me and Doodle, that help my client book an appointment with me. This freelancer tool lets me and my client schedule a meeting without doing a lot of back-and-forth emails and chats.

The beauty of a scheduling platform like Calendly is that the client will see when you are available. It will tell the client the date, time, and number of hours or minutes he can talk to you.

They will not know what are the activities you have during your booked dates. So whether you are doing business or just playing golf on the shaded schedule, they have no clue. They will only see the day and time that you are available, they can schedule it, you will get a confirmation email, and your calendar will be blocked on that date. Using this freelance tool shows your professionalism, keeps you posted with your appointments, and saves you time.

There you have it – our pick for the top 5 freelancer tools that you should be paying for. If using these freelancer tools can save you time and make your performance better, don’t be afraid to bite the bullet. More free time and better service for your clients translate to more opportunities to grow your freelancing career.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Who doesn’t like freelancer tools!? In today’s episode, we talk about the latest freelancer tools and resources you can use to make their day more efficient. One of the best ways to help you grow your freelancing career is to invest on tools and resour... Who doesn’t like freelancer tools!? In today’s episode, we talk about the latest freelancer tools and resources you can use to make their day more efficient. One of the best ways to help you grow your freelancing career is to invest on tools and resources that help manage your day-to-day workload. These freelancer tools help … Top 5 Tools Freelancers Should Be Paying For Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:53
Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-freelancing-sucks-and-what-you-can-do-to-make-it-better/ Tue, 03 Dec 2019 15:43:53 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6699 https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-freelancing-sucks-and-what-you-can-do-to-make-it-better/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-freelancing-sucks-and-what-you-can-do-to-make-it-better/feed/ 0 Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better Are you just getting into freelancing and want to know the sucky aspects of it? Maybe you’ve been a freelancer for a while and know what I am about to say, but need some tips on how to make the cruddy aspects …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-freelancing-sucks-and-what-you-can-do-to-make-it-better/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better</span> Read More »</a></p> Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better

Are you just getting into freelancing and want to know the sucky aspects of it? Maybe you’ve been a freelancer for a while and know what I am about to say, but need some tips on how to make the cruddy aspects of freelancing better? Freelancing is a GREAT career, but it’s not all unicorns and rainbows! Let’s talk about the sucky part of freelancing and how to make it better.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

So why does freelancing suck? And how can you make it better? That’s the context of today’s class. You normally hear me talking about why freelancing is great and why you should do it. And I still think that’s very much the case. But there are some sucky aspects of being a freelancer and I’m going to tell you what they are and how you can make them better. The first thing I want to discuss is the dog eat dog world out there of competition. It seems that there are so many freelancers and it’s just growing every year you see the stats from Upwork they do these big studies and how freelancing is just exploding all over the world. People

People just want to make a name for themselves and make a career for themselves and just seems to be an endless supply of marketers and writers and designers and coders. Just the list goes on and on. And every niche There seems to be a flood of competition. Well, how do you overcome that? Well, the first thing you should do is get yourself educated on how to brand yourself and how to niche yourself into the right. Basically, niche yourself the right way into the way that you think that aligns with your passion. And there’s an exercise we do at Freelancer masterclass and how to find your niche and, and really align that with your passion but, but honestly, if you just do the same old Hi, I’m a marketer, I can help you with your marketing. I’m a marketing leader, I have positive return on it. I give positive return on investments for every client, blah, blah, blah. I’m a writer. I do great blog posts and I can really make your stuff go viral. It’s just generic, this generic that that’s not going to get you very far and certainly if you’re a full time freelancer, so

That is one of the reasons why freelancing sucks is that there’s so much competition you do have to know about branding and marketing yourself. Another reason is self motivation is really important for a freelancer, you have to know that you don’t want a regular job and really to experience that hatred have a regular job of you. I really don’t like to use Word hate but if you want to use that term, some people really do not like a regular job getting dressed going to work in traffic and coming home when the man the boss tells you to come home, right? A lot of people don’t like that aspect of it, office politics of it. So in order for you to really be motivated to become a freelancer, you have to experience how much you don’t like

getting a full time job and then you’re going to realize that once you quote unquote don’t have a regular job I say full time but I mean regular job. You have to realize that self motivation is one of the key things

Drivers you have to get up every day and understand that marketing yourself branding yourself getting clients for yourself is the top of the funnel main purpose for your continuation of your job, okay? And if you are not self motivated, none of that will exist. So you have to learn self motivation. How do you do that? There’s tons of ways to learn self motivation. One is just really understanding what value you provide, what passion you provide to this earth, what value you provide to the world why you’re doing what you’re doing. And that’s usually self motivation enough, is not wanting to go back to that nine to five job. Okay? And if that isn’t enough, read a book on self motivation. There’s tons of people out there like Tony Robbins of the world that will give you a lot of yapper a lot of circular logic, a lot of inspirational talk, I find that stuff kind of useless.

Really, because I am the type of person that can be

Just wake up every day and just love what I do and get motivated. I’ve never had that issue. But I do know freelancers that just struggle every day to get up and make money for themselves, right. And if you’re one of those people, learn how to do it through books through courses, or just find your alignment where your passion lies, and it won’t be an issue at all. Another issue, another reason why freelancing sucks is because it’s a lonely way to make a living. You often wonder if anyone’s listening out there. You know, a large part of bringing in clients is creating content. And sometimes you just feel like you’re shouting into an empty room. Is anyone listening? You created a blog post? No one likes it. You created a YouTube video. No one’s viewing it. It’s a lonely way to make a living. You’re in your house many times you’re working for yourself. You don’t have any employees. Most freelancers don’t. So, at some point, you kind of wonder, you know, hey, I wonder what it’s like out there in the real world. Maybe go grab a cup of coffee, sit on the coffee shop. I know lots of freelancers who just get out of the house and use Starbucks.

says their home office. There’s a lot of CO ops. Now if you want to overcome this aspect of feeling lonely as there’s entrepreneurial Co Op offices, I have two in my city alone where you just go and you rent an office for a couple hundred dollars a month, or a cubicle. And you’re among other independent consultants and freelancers out there and you go to work every day and you do deal with that commute. But you have all that regular aspects of get having a job, just you’re going to report to yourself.

Another aspect of why freelancing sucks is you have to learn how to keep it separate, okay, you’ll have to learn how to separate your work in your personal life. There’s a lot of aspects to working on your house that you really don’t know how it’s going to interfere with your daily work day until you experience it. Okay, you have to learn how to manage distractions. All right, so here’s a perfect example not putting down my wife at all. But my wife and I have an 11 week old baby and she’s in the next room over right here. Hopefully she can hear me

In my in my house and I hear the baby crying, I want to go and help out.

I’m at work now. So it’s hard. But at the same time, that is some of the benefits of working for yourself is that you can go and take a break from work for an hour to and work your own hours. And you don’t have to lock yourself in your office from eight to five. But in the case where there’s distractions that take you away from work, you’re going to have to deal with that. And you have to learn how to deal with that. And it’s very difficult sometimes.

Let’s say you have multiple kids and they all want daddy’s attention or mommy’s attention, and they don’t respect a closed door in the home office. That’s something you’re going to have to deal with. And the solution that could be that Co Op office that I just discussed. Another reason why freelancing sucks is you get really excited about making money, right? That first multi thousand dollar contract you’re bringing, you’re like, Whoa, somebody’s paying me $10,000 for a month’s worth of work. That’s incredible. And then you start

Think about all the different ways you can start bringing in clients it really once you get that first one or two clients, there’s that hurdle that you just pass you like, Oh my god, all these ideas start coming in your head and you start to get really excited. And then you start going in all these different directions, right? Well, if this can make money, how come I can’t do this, or maybe I should add this to my business, everything becomes an opportunity. And then when that happens, everything becomes a distraction. Okay? So you really have to manage that and really reel that in and become focused as an entrepreneur and tell yourself that this is the way that I make money now, it doesn’t mean I’m blocking out everything. I’m going to write down ideas. I have what’s called an Evernote app on my phone where I get ideas, I just don’t want to deal with them right now. And then I flush them out later and see how I can I can build my business. But at the same time, I need to stay laser focused on my core central passion about making money. Another reason why freelancing does suck is finding clients does kind of suck i personally

like it because it’s my specialty. And I teach that a freelancer masterclass how I find clients and how you can too,

but with an employer that that the stress doesn’t exist. Alright, finding clients is something that your employer will do for you if you even need to do that. You know, if you’re an HR rep, for example, or a designer, for example, you never have to worry about bringing in clients for your employer. That’s not something you have to do. But if you’re a designer or an HR rep consultant, or freelancer, you’re going to have to learn how to bring in clients. All right, and those two usually don’t translate well if you don’t know how to do that. So you have to learn how to find clients. That’s often the biggest hurdle and reason why it’s called us freelancing is called a side hustle. is because a lot of freelancers don’t know how to do that to make that a full time gig.

Another reason why freelancing sucks is it takes hours to get used to

me mean sorry, the hours take some time to get used to you know if if you feel that

Saturday and Tuesday could be the same for you. That’s possible that you could be a great freelancer. Many, many people, millions of people across the world think that Saturday and Sunday is fun time. And many freelancers don’t ever experience a weekend day the same that they do as if they were working for a full time Freelancer for a full time consultant. Or I’m sorry, geez, my focus is off now. They don’t experience the same hours I do working for a full time employer. Now, you can structure your day as a freelancer to say Saturdays and Sundays are off. But if you’re someone like me, and you know that other freelancers out there are competing for your business, and that Saturdays and Sundays are not time off. It’s an opportunity for you to get ahead and scale your business when other freelancers are taking time off then. That’s, that’s bad. If there’s guys out there like that like me, that can take the

business from you, if you’re in my niche, and I’ll be working on Saturdays and Sundays and you’re not, so you have to have that mental mindset of is today Saturday, it doesn’t really matter. Okay? That doesn’t mean you’re working seven days a week. That just means you’re structuring your weekly different maybe Tuesdays are your day off. I highly encourage you taking a day off. But if you’re taking the same days off as your competitors, then you are putting yourself in alignment with those competitors. Okay, you got to think about how you’re going to separate yourself from competitors. Are you Saturdays Saturday mornings is ketchup time. I like to catch up on work that I missed out on, or I’m not falling behind on. I’ll take Saturday. evenings and afternoons off. Sure. But Saturday morning is my work time. Thursdays are usually my day off. It’s just something the pattern of my day I just something I

told my clients is that Thursdays I don’t take appointments. I’ll talk to you on Saturday mornings, or I’ll catch up on work on Saturdays. It’s just my flow, you’ll come up with your own flow. Another big reason why freelancing stuff

There’s no benefits, no work equals no pay. If you’re sick, you don’t get paid. Okay? There’s really no way around that, except that you have to manage. Try not to be sick. So there are ways to do that a lot of people ignore their health and I could make a whole video or podcast about this as managing your health as a freelancer. Actually, that’s a good idea. Mike, I’ll note that down. I take as a freelancer, I take daily vitamins I take supplements, because now my health is that much more important, especially as a child, you know, child children have germs, they come home with all sorts of stuff that you can get sick from. You have to really manage that keep up with your fitness.

I like those watches that force you to do 10,000 steps a day and remind you that if you’re, if you’re not going to hit that number, if that’s what it takes for you to get fit, then go ahead and do that schedule an hour a day for fitness. You’ll be surprised at how little you get sick. I rarely get sick maybe once a year. I’ve won a couple years recently where I didn’t get sick at all.

And when I do, it’s very minor. Okay?

It used to not be that way when I was working at an office, as an employer or for an employer, I get colds and stuff because other people come to work sick. I get frequent, frequently sick just like everybody else. But now I don’t. Another reason why freelancing suck. It’s it sucks is it’s difficult conversations are more frequent. So negotiating pay, determining your scope of work deadlines to clients, all that kind of stuff sucks. But I’ll tell you a solution to that is experience. It gets better over time, I really don’t have an issue negotiating pay. In fact, I rarely even have that conversation with clients now. Just because of the way I structure my discovery calls and I tell them flat out what, what it’s going to cost and I build my value in and they don’t even question it. scope of work does. It’s always going to be there because you have to determine what you’re going to be charging your client for, and the deadlines to the client. But that’s a conversation that just gets easier over time. So I hope you understand that

freelancing is not all cherries, rainbows and unicorns. I’m not sure how cherries got into that sentence but rainbows and unicorns are always great. But freelancing is a fantastic way to make a career but there are some crappy aspects to it and I hope this video and podcast helped you understand those aspects and how to overcome them. Good luck. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better Are you just getting into freelancing and want to know the sucky aspects of it? Maybe you’ve been a freelancer for a while and know what I am about to say, Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better Are you just getting into freelancing and want to know the sucky aspects of it? Maybe you’ve been a freelancer for a while and know what I am about to say, but need some tips on how to make the cruddy aspects … Why Freelancing Sucks – And What You Can Do To Make It Better Read More » Mike Volkin 13:40
Top 3 ways to find clients during the holiday season https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-ways-to-find-clients-during-the-holiday-season/ Tue, 26 Nov 2019 18:08:06 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6657 https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-ways-to-find-clients-during-the-holiday-season/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-ways-to-find-clients-during-the-holiday-season/feed/ 0 The holiday season is a tough time to drum up business for most freelancers and consultants. Your prospects and clients are often busy and not thinking about work as much. Let me show you some simple ways to drum up some business during the holiday season. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-ways-to-find-clients-during-the-holiday-season/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Top 3 ways to find clients during the holiday season</span> Read More »</a></p> The holiday season is a tough time to drum up business for most freelancers and consultants. Your prospects and clients are often busy and not thinking about work as much. Let me show you some simple ways to drum up some business during the holiday season.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

everyone I am Mike Volkin, lead instructor Freelancer masterclass and host of the very popular Freelancer school I’m very humbled by all the attention it’s been getting lately and all the great comments and the stats are just skyrocketing upwards in hockey stick fashion, in interviews and listen, so I’m very humbled by that. Thank you for listening. This topic is on the top three ways to find freelance clients during the holiday season. It is a holiday season now we’re in the fourth quarter if you’re listening to this live or almost live and we’ve got a common problem that a lot of freelancers in consultants have there in this time of years that their clients are very slow to respond to emails and their prospecting is very hard to do because many people don’t respond to proposals and, and because a lot of their potential clients are on vacation or, or have one foot out the door, you know of work. So let’s talk about the top three ways to find freelance clients during the holiday season. The first thing I would recommend is to touch base with past clients. Now, even if you’ve been an experienced Freelancer don’t have any freelance to work at all. You only have a few past clients doesn’t have to be a big project. You don’t have to over engineer this, okay? All you have to do is take your your best clients that you know, ended well the relationships ended well. There’s always a potential for future work. You’d like to work with them in the future. And you simply send them an email, ask them how they’ve been okay. You can ask them their plans for the upcoming year. You can ask them there if they met their goals for last year. For example, I had a client I just followed up with because I did a, I worked with one of their web designers and did a whole website revamp for them, and it changed their entire company. And when I was done with that project, I kind of left them and I went on to other other clients, other projects. That was about six months ago. I then followed up with him a few weeks ago or a couple weeks ago, and he’s now told me Well, the websites double the traffic, we have more organic hits coming in from search engine optimizations than it you know, because of your search engine optimization work than ever before. We’re about 250% in traffic since the website launch. Okay, great. You know what, that’s a big win. And it just showed that I followed up with him he care it showed him that I cared about what he was, what he was doing and how he was doing and how his company was doing. So he very much appreciated that. And now I have another project on my plate he gave me because I followed up with him. Now I wasn’t expecting work. I was just generally curious on how His website and just the holiday season and getting touched in touch with past clients made me think of Oh, I wonder how that website revamp is doing. Okay, you can do the same thing. simply send them a note with no selling or preconditions that just makes you top of mind to them. Okay? You can ask them questions specific to their business or specific to the personal life.

Another thing another way to get freelance clients during the holiday season is you’ve got a gift to receive so give them something of value. You know, I hire a lot of freelancers, and every year I get a slew of even though I don’t drink coffee, I get a slew of coffee cards in the mail which are nice you know, I give him to my wife there’s still nice I last year got nice Harry and David’s Asian pear collection My God was most delicious forever eight. I got cherries, berries, I get box of chocolates. I get all sorts of stuff right? past freelancers are want to stay top of mind with me because I treat them right. I give Work, why not send them a few dollars here and there to show them the appreciation? I’m not suggesting you do that. I don’t do that, personally, unless clients have given me a lot of work. You know, I’m talking about 30,000 plus for the year. So you can mail them a simple card, you can give them suggestions to improve their latest blog post title, if you’re a writer, you know, freelance writers make up the largest contingent of freelancers. And if you’re a writer looking to drum up business, and let’s say you’ve written a blog post, or a few blog posts and titles for a previous client, just go back to them and say, Hey, listen, I was looking at your blog a few days ago, and I noticed you’ve got a few new blog posts that could use some optimization. Remember these SEO keywords you told me we needed to go after? Well, it turns out they’re not in your title. So I suggest changing your last couple titles to this, this and this. All right, you know, that shows them that you care to put some thought into it. And hey, that’s right. I remember you. We’ve got a big push and content marketing coming up. Do you want to help you know, it’s that easy. It happens all the time. And if you freelance marketer, one of the things you can do give them a free website review saying hey, I noticed since we last touch base, you made these changes to your homepage, I suggest doing this, this and this to improve your marketing or inbound traffic or conversions or whatever it may be. All right. So you can give them website review, you can improve their latest blog post title, improve anything based on what you do as a freelancer, you can help them just by reaching out and sending a quick comment again, being top of mind. And the third thing I recommend is to connect with other freelancers and strategic partners. Two different things here. Sometimes there’s a gray area there, but let me explain. When you’re talking to freelancers, those are people who don’t necessarily do what you do. So I’m a marketer. I work with graphic designers, I work with writers, I work with other marketers like SEO professionals. You know, I’m a strategist, so I won’t do SEO. Usually. I’ll work with other freelancers and the same client, but they’re not taking dollars from me. They’re not my competitors. Now, as strategic partner might be a whole other company. So let’s say I often refer clients to a particular software system or a SAS company, right? I’ll reach out to the owner of that company saying, Hey, listen a successful year for me, I drove 20 people to your to your company, or maybe two. You know, let’s talk about how we can work together more in the future. You can ask them did you meet your goals for this prior year or this year? we’re in right now or what are your goals for this upcoming year? And then you could talk about ideas to partner together for the upcoming years. You know what, it always come to the table with ideas say something like you know what, this is what I’m thinking our working relationship should be. So we can both benefit in science it’s called a symbiotic relationship. When both parties benefit when both people benefit and I have Freelancer partnership contracts in Freelancer masterclass calm, so if you haven’t taken the course go ahead and register, you get all that great stuff. But anyway, freelancers and strategic partners are a great way to get clients During the holiday season, they’re available. They’re working. Alright, so hopefully you can take either one of these three items I just mentioned or all three of them and drum up some really great business for the end of this year and for the upcoming year. Okay, good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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The holiday season is a tough time to drum up business for most freelancers and consultants. Your prospects and clients are often busy and not thinking about work as much. Let me show you some simple ways to drum up some business during the holiday sea... The holiday season is a tough time to drum up business for most freelancers and consultants. Your prospects and clients are often busy and not thinking about work as much. Let me show you some simple ways to drum up some business during the holiday season. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and … Top 3 ways to find clients during the holiday season Read More » Mike Volkin 7:34
An interview with Grant Baldwin: How Freelancers Can Find and Book Speaking Gigs https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-grant-baldwin-how-freelancers-can-find-and-book-speaking-gigs/ Tue, 26 Nov 2019 18:06:19 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6655 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-grant-baldwin-how-freelancers-can-find-and-book-speaking-gigs/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-grant-baldwin-how-freelancers-can-find-and-book-speaking-gigs/feed/ 0 As a freelancer, making a name for yourself is important. There are few marketing channels better at doing that than becoming a paid speaker. In today’s episode, I talk with Grant Baldwin, owner of The Speaker Lab. Grant explains to me how freelancers can find and book speaking gigs, oftentimes for lots of money. Show …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-grant-baldwin-how-freelancers-can-find-and-book-speaking-gigs/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Grant Baldwin: How Freelancers Can Find and Book Speaking Gigs</span> Read More »</a></p> As a freelancer, making a name for yourself is important. There are few marketing channels better at doing that than becoming a paid speaker. In today’s episode, I talk with Grant Baldwin, owner of The Speaker Lab.

Grant explains to me how freelancers can find and book speaking gigs, oftentimes for lots of money.

Show Notes:

Grant Baldwin is an engaging communicator and a leading expert at helping students prepare for life after high school. His focus lately has been on helping people become paid speakers.

Grant is the author of the book the Successful Speaker and is the owner of thespeakerlab.com. He has given hundreds of presentations and has spoken to over 250,000 people in 42 states through leadership conferences, conventions, school assemblies, and other student events.

While Grant does love speaking and inspiring students, he loves his wife and three daughters more. They live in Nashville, Tennessee.

Questions
1. So you teach people how to find and book speaking gigs. Is it important for lead generation for freelancers and consultants to be speakers?
2. How did you get into your line of work?
3. What’s the most common problem you see beginner speakers make?
4. What is the compensation like for speakers? Especially beginner speakers?
5. Where do you see yourself and the Speaker Lab going in the next few years?
6. How can our audience follow you online?

 

Be sure to check out Grants free tool at Myspeakerfee.com


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Join me on my

master class. Today we are joined by Grant Baldwin, all when he’s an engaging communicator and a leading expert of helping students prepare for life after high school, however, now he runs the speaker lab and he has a new book coming out called the successful speaker and he’s given hundreds of presentations and spoken to over a quarter million people in 42 different states about everything from leadership conferences, I’m sorry about leadership at school assemblies, the school assemblies and conferences and conventions. Welcome to the show, Grant.

Thanks, Mike. Appreciate you. Let me hang out with you.

So you teach people how to finding books speaking gigs, right? So is it important for lead generation for our Freelancer audience and consultants and agencies to do that for lead generation?

Yeah, absolutely. So it is one of a variety of different ways that you can generate leads for a business. And so if someone is is is listening or watching and said, Hey, I enjoy speaking speakers, one of the things I want to do more of, we have a lot of speakers that we work with and speakers that we in the industry, they use speaking primarily as lead gen for whether it’s a consulting or coaching or some other type of agency business that they may run on the back end. So yes, we can can work really, really, really well for Legion.

Good. How did you get into this? Because I’m just starting to really get I’ve done talks in the past, but I never really had a structured calendar. Like if people ask me, I’ll go give a talk. I didn’t really sell involved it was become a paid speaker. How did you get involved in that and make it a regular part of your schedule?

Yeah, there’s definitely a few moving pieces to it. So to back way up in high school, I was really involved in my local church. My youth pastor had a really big impact on my life. And so I he was one of the best speakers I’ve seen as like I want to do that. That seems like a cool gig. And so I actually worked at a local church for a little while as a youth pastor, I had a lot of opportunities to speak. I felt like I was maybe similar spot to you, I felt like I was decent at it, want to do more of it had done a little bit of it, but just no idea where to begin. So yeah, I met a couple other speakers who are speakers, and they were speaking full time and I started just kind of picking their brain learning about the business and just decided to go all in on it. So it took me a little bit to go from from zero to being able to do it full time. But for the next several years, I was a full time speaker travel all over the primarily the US spoken about speaking at hundreds of different conferences and events and so not to a point where I have a lot of people who are asking, kind of like you like hey, I want to do this, I’m interested. But I don’t know what I don’t know. I don’t know where to go out here. And so that’s where we start creating a couple different training programs and resources and products to basically helps it help teach the systems that we use to be able to find and book speaking gigs. So Yeah, for some people they want to just speaking is kind of a sideline thing of, hey, I want to do it a few times on the side. And that’s fine. There’s nothing wrong with that. There’s also people who say, hey, Grant, I saw, you know what, what you’ve done and how you’ve built your business. And I want to be a full time speaker as well. I want to do you know, 50 6070 gigs. And the nice thing about speaking is there’s no right or wrong amount. There’s no one size fits all. So it’s really kind of what makes the most sense for you. Yeah, in terms of how much you want to be doing, but also who you want to be speaking to, and why you want to be speaking. So whether that’s lead gen, or, for me, primarily, for a long time speaking was just the core of what I did. It wasn’t trying to do lead gen for some other part of the business. It was just I wanted to be a speaker. So you can give me us a lot of different ways.

Yeah. And I think a big misconception is that most people think speaking is about keynote speaking, but that’s not the case. Right?

Yeah, you can absolutely do speaking in a lot of different format. So keynote is definitely one of the primary ways is probably the thing that people are most familiar with. You also do a lot of different workshops or breakouts or seminars. We haven’t members, don’t think about it. can also be done in an online context, whether that’s through, you know, podcasts interviews like this or you’re doing webinars or trainings or some type of virtual summit or Facebook Lives or there’s a lot of different ways that you can present it’s obviously a different little bit of a different context versus a live being in front of an audience. But speaking can definitely take a lot of different forms.

I think people would the introverts would rather do online since they don’t have to be in front of a stage right. So

maybe I personally, I found this I’m fairly introverted and most most speakers that I know are relatively introverted, and so we enjoy being on stage we enjoy you know, hanging out and that type of setting but at the cost me very tiring, can be very draining. And so, yeah, one of the things I’ve noticed is there’s there’s a lot of speakers that are very introverted, so it’s also kind of a misconception that you feel like, okay, in order to be a public speaker, whatever form that means that you have to be this this kind of raging extrovert, you have to be the life of the party. I’ve just found that most speakers are not that at all.

Yeah, that’s so true. I know. People like to be on stage like top comedians, they all say they’re introverts. They don’t. You know, but if you place them in a party in the middle of people, they get a little little antsy, you know, but what is the most common mistake that you see beginner speakers make or or somebody like me who’s thinking about becoming a speaker, make it a regular part of their schedule? What is a common mistake you might see?

Yeah, one of the biggest common mistakes is that speakers don’t get really clear on who they speak to. And what’s the problem that they solve? Most speakers, especially when you’re getting started, that you just enjoy speaking, speaking is fun, you want to do more of it. So you try to go from whatever opportunity that you can get. And so what that means is, we end up saying, when people ask Who do you speak to our responses kind of will? Who do you want me to speak to? Or what do you want me to talk about? I can talk about anything, I’ll talk to whoever, because we just enjoy speaking, but it’s a horrible way to build a business. So for anyone that’s a freelancer, and if someone were to say what kind of freelance work you do, and if they say, Well, I can do anything, it’s like, well, the reality is, is you can’t I mean, if you thought you could you probably suck at it. So being really clear and say I do this one very specific type of freelance work. Or I speak to this one very specific type of audience for this very specific type of problem. So one of the things that we teach teach our students we talked about in the successful speaker book is that you want to be the Steakhouse and not the buffet. You want to be the steakhouse, not the buffet, meaning, if we’re going to go to lunch, and we wanted to get a good steak, you could go to a buffet where steak is one of 100 different things that they offer, and they’re probably all fairly mediocre. Or you could go to the Steakhouse where this is all we do, we do steak, and we do it really, really well. So if you want tacos, that’s not us. If you want spaghetti, that’s not us. If you want pizza, that’s not us. But you want a really good steak. We’re the go to place. So that’s how you want to make sure that you position yourself as a speaker instead of trying to be all things for all people.

That’s a good analogy. And it’s like, actually, let’s talk about compensation first before we get to to off topic and what I was about to say but most people think that speaking is just for lead gen. They don’t get paid for it. But that’s not the case you actually get paid for speaking and in some cases very well right. What’s the what’s the compensation for a speaker whether beginner or expert

you There’s a lot of variables that go into it for sure, you can actually for some speakers, depending on the model, what it is that they speak about, there’s a lot of speakers who actually can generate more on the back end from the lead gen that they’re doing than what they could actually get paid for. But if you can get paid for it, and generate lead gen and create business on the back end, then you can kind of double dip there and it can be a big win. But there’s again, a lot of variables that go into, like, who you speak to what you speak about how long you’ve been speaking with your marketing materials look like, but it can range from, you know, a couple thousand dollars to 10s of thousands of dollars for celebrity speaker so people ask us regularly grant how much how much should I charge as a speaker? And the answer is honestly, it depends which is a horrible answer. So actually, one of the things we put together as a free tool, people can find that my speaker fee calm my speaker fee calm. It’s a free tool, answer a couple questions that will tell you what you should be charging as a speaker based on your industry based on your experience based on a variety different variables there. So yeah, check that out. My speaker p.com

writing it down. So I’ll put it in the show notes for everybody my feed calm. So speaker lab has a bunch of resources for people who want to become a paid speaker. Is it necessarily for people who are already paid speaker looking to diversify or change their business at all?

No, absolutely. So people that are brand new to speaking and those that have been at it for a while, and everything in between. So if you are interested at all in speaking, whether that is, again, you want to be a full time speaker, or you want to use it as lead gen, and do a couple gigs on the side here there and just do stuff locally. That’s fine. You’re going to find podcast episodes and resources there for you to help you build and grow your speaking business. Very nice. And the speaker, the successful speaker book, when is that coming out? The successful speaker book is going to be out in February 2020. So it’ll be here before we know

and that’ll be paperback and ebook and on

the hardcover. Yep. Yep, yep, audio book and all all of the all of the versions that are available, it will be available.

Very cool. And my last question is in regards to Speaker lab, tell us real quick what’s on there and where you expected to be in a few Yours is that it’s not a new site though, right? It’s been around for

Yes. We’ve been in business for about four years now. And so we do we teach all the business of how to find in books speaking gigs. So we have a couple different types of training programs there some different courses. So depending on what someone is looking for people are interested in kind of learning more about that they can certainly check out the speaker lab calm if you want to talk with one of our team members about how we can help you build and grow your speaking business. You can go to the speaker lab comm slash apply the speaker lab comm slash apply, you can schedule a free consultation, call there and talk with our team about what you may be looking for and how we can help you

very cool. I’m definitely going there. Since that is my goal for the next year is to be a regular paid speaker. Tell us how our audience can follow you online. Yeah, so

the speaker lab is the best place to find me. You can also find me. Greg Walden, calm is my personal site, if you want to check that out. But the bulk of what we do is related to speaking is all going to be found at the speaker lab.com.

Very cool. Thank you so much for your time and let’s keep in touch. Okay, thanks. I appreciate it. Thanks.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

 

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As a freelancer, making a name for yourself is important. There are few marketing channels better at doing that than becoming a paid speaker. In today’s episode, I talk with Grant Baldwin, owner of The Speaker Lab. As a freelancer, making a name for yourself is important. There are few marketing channels better at doing that than becoming a paid speaker. In today’s episode, I talk with Grant Baldwin, owner of The Speaker Lab. Grant explains to me how freelancers can find and book speaking gigs, oftentimes for lots of money. Show … An interview with Grant Baldwin: How Freelancers Can Find and Book Speaking Gigs Read More » Mike Volkin 10:20
An Interview with David Brier-All About Freelancer Branding https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-david-brier-all-about-freelancer-branding/ Tue, 19 Nov 2019 15:01:32 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6638 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-david-brier-all-about-freelancer-branding/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-david-brier-all-about-freelancer-branding/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Time to learn about freelancer branding David Brier. Davids has been called the 007 of Branding, the slayer of the mundane, liberator of awesome, and crusher of mediocrity. David and his work have been featured in ADWEEK, Fast Company, Forbes, INC, Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, Thrive Global, the New York Times and numerous blogs …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-david-brier-all-about-freelancer-branding/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview with David Brier-All About Freelancer Branding</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Time to learn about freelancer branding
David Brier. Davids has been called the 007 of Branding, the slayer of the mundane, liberator of awesome, and crusher of mediocrity.

David and his work have been featured in ADWEEK, Fast Company, Forbes, INC, Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, Thrive Global, the New York Times and numerous blogs and podcasts around the world.

His videos on branding and innovation broke the million-view mark several times over.

Questions
1. Tell me about how you ended up being presented the Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship?
2. How does a freelancer brand themselves?
3. What mistakes do you see entrepreneurs and freelancers make when it comes to branding?
4. I see you’re active on LinkedIn, is that important for a freelancer?
5. You have a blog post titled how to make competitors irrelevant. Can you share with us some tips from that post?
6. How can our audience follow you online?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

alright hello everybody I am Mike Volkin, lead instructor Freelancer masterclass and host of Freelancer school Today we have with us David Briar David has been called the double oh seven of branding. He’s also been called the slayer of the mundane and the Liberator of awesome i love that title and the crusher of mediocrity, mediocrity. So David and his work has been featured in in Adweek and Fast Company and Forbes, Inc, Huffington Post, entrepreneur thrive global New York Times list goes on and on and numerous blogs podcasts like this one now. So his videos on branding and innovation broke the million view markets Several times over. Welcome to the show. David. Thank you so much for having me. I love it though. Tell me how you ended up being you know presented at the presidential on ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship. I actually looked it up and I it even still is it active anymore because I don’t I didn’t see they awarded a recipient this year.

No, no, it’s it’s not it’s not it was it was actually in here. I’ll even I’ll even show you. Okay. This is like so you see. So let’s see. Oh, yeah, you can there is lettering. There you go there. That looks cool. And then and then, you know, here, here, here this little bad boy is right there. Wow. Very cool. You know? Yeah, yeah. Yeah. It’s like it was really really awesome. And basically basically, if for those that do follow me, they would know that that Damon john and i really we kind of established a good bond and a good relationship. Some years ago. Me and how That came about just to give a context. So people don’t think that I’m sort of, you know, oh, you know, he’s so lucky. So he knows the right people while he was cast, though, that basically my wife and I were We were early, early, early fans, so like, so shark tank is in just starting at the 11th season, right? So like, in the first couple years, I mean, we discovered it, and my wife and I, we’d love it, that was like our guilty pleasure. We’d love seeing the sharks and and how they, you know, county, they would make an offer, they would counter each other and the older negotiations, as well as what they would really ask of the different entrepreneurs who were coming to pitch stuff. And so being a fan of the show, after I don’t know, maybe after watching it for a year or a little more, at the time, I was writing articles for Fast Company magazine. And so I was like, you know, I want to look at what are the what are the qualities and traits that take one person from sort of being Thank you for coming, you’re dead to me get out of here, you know, it’s like you’re they don’t get a deal to those that actually get a deal with a shark. And so I did my own analysis and I forget exactly what I called it. I think I called the article somebody like, like how to swim with the sharks and come out alive and you know, whatever, like the fourth, one of the traits that actually make the ones that win versus the one to lose. Within a day or two of that being published. Damon john ended up tweeting. He literally tweeted out the best article written on Shark Tank ever, you know, and I needed it out. And I was like, holy crap, right. And so of course, I retweeted it. And I replied immediately to him saying, dude, thanks so much, and we did not know each other at the time. And, but being a shameless entrepreneur myself, besides being creative, and most of the staff to me Creativity and entrepreneurship are kind of really they’re, they’re

they’re two sides of the coin.

And so I said, Dude, you really need you deserve a slogan. And because my mind was going, I was like thinking of like, Wow, this is so cool. Damon’s like, really validated my thing here. And because I really thought, you know, what would be a cool slogan or phrase that might work for, let’s say, possibly a blog, you know, a blog post, and I came up with a Damon is a girl’s best friend. Right? Yeah. Sorry, sorry

that

those shifts. I shared that with him. It is all going back and forth on tweet. Right, right. And he goes, love it. I said, we should do it. We should do an interview man. I’ll interview you will do an article that ended up so we just kind of got to know each other and he was all into it. Then we, you know, be later than discovered. He was born in Brooklyn. I was born in Brooklyn. He was born. He was raised in Queens. I was raised in Queens. So we’re really literally You know, we’re, we’re 10 years apart in age, but we have a very similar where we grew up origins. So over the years, you know, I mean, I’ve always, always done things. I mean, I like what Damon stands for. I like his work ethic. I like his entrepreneurial ethic. He’s always very gracious to, he never forgets where he came from mean, he doesn’t have like, I breathe a different type of air than you, you know, there’s no division. Yeah. And I, and I recognize that so I’ll always do articles and stuff. So what ended up happening? I mean, I presume if you’ve seen my book where he wrote the foreword to it, yes. So that so that was a that was a I said, David, I said, this would really become coming out with it’s gonna be a killer book. And you’d be the perfect one the right before and he was like, I’m all in. I mean, he was just super gracious. And so we just had this kind of nice symbiotic relationship. And I was literally out of the country. This is how it came about. This is all the leader to answer your question. How did I get this thing happens is I I’m out of the country delivering a week long entrepreneurial masterclass to entrepreneurs from around the world, different continents around the world. And I fly back and my wife and I like whenever I’m flying I’m here My wife is was home. She, she’ll always be like, Hey, I’ll see you when you get home. No problem. But she like left me this message because I was going to do a sale, a quick little leg. One leg was going to leave me in Miami before I went home. She was calling me as soon as you get home. Call me students. Like what? So I call her up bad or good? Yeah, she goes, she goes, first. First of all, you got this thing from David at the time, had come out with with the power broke and he actually had that. And so he wrote to me, you know, he always he always is again. He wrote he said, you know, Thanks for always all the support you always given me Give me the whole thing. And then he said, you know, and appreciation for everything you’ve done because he’s an up he’s a, he’s a presidential Ambassador is a, you know, a global entrepreneurship. And he obviously was presented these. And he said, By the way, I want to give one of these to you. You deserve it. Nice. That’s how I got very cool.

Very cool. What year was that?

I would say about three years ago. Okay. Very good. Very good.

So so you’re an expert branding is your thing. Right? So how does a freelancer all freelancers are listening right now? How do they brand themselves? I mean, it’s just, it’s like a buzzword. You know, branding freelancers really don’t know how to go about doing it. I’d love to hear your thoughts on that.

Um, well, yeah, I’ll give you I’ll definitely give you my thoughts because you know, I was a freelancer when I first started. And, to me, if you’re a freelancer, I don’t consider it. This is my opinion and take And what I found is, I didn’t find being a freelancer was necessarily coming from a place of power. Like in terms of your position, it’s, you know that it’s like, it’s kind of like just like I wouldn’t ever want to consider myself or put myself in category being a vendor, which I don’t think is a strong position, like vendors have tried to change the dialogue where they are partnering right with their customers, right? I think freelancers similarly need to be they need to elevate themselves upwards to how are they going to be something more? How are they going to be, you know, whether it may be as is a consultant, or a specialist in this or that in the other? Because no one is looking say, you know what, no one wakes up in the morning goes, I really need a freelancer. But what they do wake up and say in the morning is, hey, especially if they’re a business that you’re serving, or they’re an agency, whatever, I need the right talent for. Right. They’ve got a nose. They’ve got a problem, or whether you some freelancers work directly with businesses, others work with agencies and such like that, but whoever what is the problem that one would need to know that they are solving and be associated with? Like, I like I solve blank, I eliminate blank. What What is it the thing that you do? So, it’s almost like, I did a video, maybe maybe nine months ago. And I said be the verb. The verb. Yeah. The words like don’t like, like, you know, it’s like what is like I, you know, what’s the thing that you do? Like, instead of like I am and, like, perfect example, essentially, I’m an actor. It’s like, I entertain people. You see, that moves it. So literally, like be the verb. It’s like, well said like, I am a freelancer. From a branding standpoint, I say, Well, like I, you know, you know, I attract new customers. I do this Do that I bring about the end result.

Yes. Yeah like that going right to the end result that’s why you talk to people right? So what mistakes Do you see entrepreneurs and freelancers make when it comes to branding? Is there some kind of like Deadly Sins out there for for branding that you say oh my god, I can’t believe this freelancers doing that talking about themselves. Yeah a lot of talking about themselves and thinking that they’re I’m it I’ll tell you I’ll tell you after after the first eight years

of when I first like got out of school and like was a freelancer and then I was like me to start my own businesses that the other probably after the first six to eight years, I never brought a portfolio with me over again to a meeting and my sales went up because my job was to find what’s the what what are you struggling with? You don’t need to find out more about me. I need to find out more about you.

Yeah, yeah, I have clients or prospects all the time asked me for samples of marketing strategies and like why that that doesn’t apply to your business at all other other business marketing strategies. What would you even need to see that for doesn’t make any sense? So you’re active on LinkedIn actually, was it? Do you find that important for freelancers to be very active on LinkedIn? I would say so.

Yeah, I’d say so. Yeah. Look, I mean, it’s it’s it’s the, it’s the only social now that it’s evolved to actually being a social platform. I would say 18 months ago, it was not a social platform. It still was. It still was, you know, I don’t know. Probably an advanced Rolodex. Yep, exactly. You know, and now and now it is, I mean, we just dropped we just dropped the video. I don’t know if you did you catch our most epic LinkedIn most epic music video.

Now I have to check it out. Was that posted? I haven’t checked out in like a week or so on LinkedIn. So

this was this is about about two and a half weeks ago that we dropped it. It’s it. I can send you the link when when we’re done. Okay, but that was we’re approaching 200,000 views. It went completely viral on LinkedIn. No kidding. It was insane. And it was fun. I did the beatboxing a buddy of mine that I met on LinkedIn from Sydney. He did the rapping and it’s just totally cool.

Come on out to check out what’s the title of it?

Well, we called it the most epic music video in LinkedIn history. Okay, but but my but my my buddy, who has was more followers and made more sense for us to actually do it on his thing. So I’ll end up on the beam. You just do afterward Will you tell me I’ll figure that Okay, good.

And all of you that are listening, just go to my freelancer, I’m sorry, my, my LinkedIn page and you’ll see it forwarded on my feed, so I’ll share it. So you have a blog post. It’s titled How to make competitors irrelevant. Can you share with us some tips from that? That post for those of us who haven’t read it yet?

Absolutely not know, the one thing I’m going to do real quick to make sure because I mean, I read, I read so many articles. I’m gonna I’m gonna look this one up real quick. Okay.

How to make competitors irrelevant. I think a lot of freelancers are always asking they’re always afraid of their competitors, because there’s so many of them out there, especially if you’re like a freelance writer. It’s like how do you differentiate your from all the other writers out there, right, exactly,

exactly. I mean, let me let me see what brilliants I actually I actually did that on this post here. Okay.

It was pretty good. I read through it, and I learned a lot from it. So I just want to make sure freelance audience can glean some of the tips from there.

Totally, totally. Yeah, I mean, so I mean, so, like, obviously, I mean, there’s a few things that I obviously touch upon, you know, find out I mean, the key thing that I punch up is like, basically, find out how to officially do more, provide more and transform your customer more. Yes. So so the whole thing is is the thing that I would say is that the difference between a winning Freelancer or entrepreneur and a losing Freelancer and entrepreneur is the one that’s losing is just doing what’s expected. And the most simple example that I that I give people, as I say, you know what, a store that opens up that says, You know what, we’re going to open it nine, or we’re going to close at five And when they open at nine and close at five, no one celebrates that particular fact. Yeah. You know, or if they say by the way we sell. We sell widgets. And when you go into store, they have widgets. Are you going to celebrate that? No.

memorable? Yeah, exactly.

So it’s like kind of like, to me, the basic thing is that meeting expectation is a death sentence. So you don’t want to just get like, how do you raise the bar? How do you ask more questions? How do you elevate your client more so that they get their own ability to go wow, this is really cool. And how do they use it more?

Yeah, you know why that is Davis because being regulars being comfortable, and I always tell my students at the master classes do always have something on your plate, some kind of marketing activity that makes you slightly uncomfortable and a little bit outside of your comfort zone. That way you’re always challenging yourself, right? And it doesn’t just have to be in freelancing could be in your personal life. Like every year I make a new year’s resolutions that makes that I kind of cringe at the thought that I do it like a few years ago I one of my resolutions was to go skydiving I did that this last year it was to do stand up comedy act so I created a stand up comedy actor one on stage and I did that so good.

I’ll make me feel uncomfortable that’s for sure.

How did you how did your comedy act go ahead the people will receive it well,

I thought it was funny. No, yeah. It was good people loved it. I actually posted on YouTube so if you want to just type in like Mike Volkin stand up comedy and you’ll see like it’s like a five minutes. It actually it was a they told me I’d have 10 minutes and right before I went on stage about 20 seconds they said oh, you only have time for four minutes. So for a new comic to have to adjust the flow of the of their brand new Act that they’ve never done before. I was quite nerve wracking that our last little twist on there that really took me forever.

Right.

So how does our audience follow you online?

Well, very simply mean what is they can definitely go to my website rising above the noise.com which is our is IMG rising above the noise calm You can subscribe there. I’ve got a free ebook that you could download. You could definitely I would definitely follow me on YouTube because I do one minute Wednesday will this coming week that I in fact, today’s episode 92. Nice. So and so that comes out weekly and that people love that literally, it’s a one minute. It’s like, How the hell do you jam that in? How do you get actually value in one minute? Check it out. And you’ll find out and of course, LinkedIn. It’s all about branding on that one minute Wednesday. It’s all about branding. It’s about entrepreneurship. It’s about it’s it branding is the anchor, but I look I look at it from a leadership standpoint, look at from an influence standpoint, a look from its social media standpoint. I look at it like what what a misconception standpoint, I touched upon many different facets, but it’s always about it always comes back to branding.

Good. And I love that. It’s one minute, so I know I have time for it. That’s great. I think we’re already connected on LinkedIn. But if we’re not one, just make really quick sure that we are so you can send me video so I can post it on my LinkedIn feed. And I look forward to talking to the future is very enlightening. Thank you.

Absolutely. My pleasure. Take care.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Time to learn about freelancer branding David Brier. Davids has been called the 007 of Branding, the slayer of the mundane, liberator of awesome, and crusher of mediocrity. David and his work have been featured in ADWEEK, Fast Company, Show Notes: Time to learn about freelancer branding David Brier. Davids has been called the 007 of Branding, the slayer of the mundane, liberator of awesome, and crusher of mediocrity. David and his work have been featured in ADWEEK, Fast Company, Forbes, INC, Huffington Post, Entrepreneur, Thrive Global, the New York Times and numerous blogs … An Interview with David Brier-All About Freelancer Branding Read More » Mike Volkin 17:27
How to Find Anchor Clients https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-anchor-clients/ Tue, 12 Nov 2019 15:39:06 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6225 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-anchor-clients/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-anchor-clients/feed/ 0 In this episode, Mike explains how to find anchor clients. Anchor clients are those clients that you can rely on for consistent income. Those are the clients that pay well, pay on time and have a long term vision. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-find-anchor-clients/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Find Anchor Clients</span> Read More »</a></p> In this episode, Mike explains how to find anchor clients. Anchor clients are those clients that you can rely on for consistent income. Those are the clients that pay well, pay on time and have a long term vision.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Guys Mike Volkin here with another Freelancer masterclass quick tip for you. Today we’re going to be talking about getting anchor clients to rocket you past the six figure income. All right, what is an anchor client? Let’s go ahead and define it first. Anchor clients are businesses with whom you as an independent consultant or Freelancer have an ongoing relationship with and a steady flow of projects and income. an anchor client could be responsible for 50 to 80% of your overall income. So why do we need them? Why should you have them as a consultant? Well, number one, they may As they are very good with dry spells, okay? If you as a freelancer with experience, especially the full time freelancers should know that there’s an ebb and flow to freelancing, right you have good months you’ll bad months in terms of income, you’ll have good months in terms of the amount of workload and back bad months in terms of the amount of workload. Some of our seasonal, some are beyond your control and economic but with anchor clients, all that kind of studies out. And also with anchor clients, they help you work smarter and not harder. Okay? You’re not on Discovery calls, you’re not prospecting, you’re not doing this. You should always be prospecting but not as much. Okay? And they are an excellent source of referrals. All right, if you have anchor clients with long term relationships, if you do good work for there should be no problem finding additional anchor clients. So where do we find these anchor clients, number one job posting boards, and there’s a way to do that you’re not looking for any job. You’re looking for jobs that are remote. Or telecommute jobs. You want to read through the job description and really understand if it truly is a remote job. or in any case, it might be remote, part time remote, you know. So it might be you have to be in the office three days a week. But if you’re truly looking to serve anybody in your country, for example, I’m in United States, and I’m in California want to serve somebody in New York? I’d be looking for a fully remote position of course, right. So indeed, com allows you to do that if you put in the where box you put in the word remote, but you can also do other keywords like telecommute. All right? Another one that works well but not as good as remote and telecommute is flexible. Usually you see flexible time flex or bull reporting. All right, that usually has to do with the remote job. Another place is a company called we work remotely calm, but bigger companies will come to them with steady work. It may be full time work, it may not be but your sweet spot here is to be able to freelance consultant your own, but at the same time be able to have a couple anchor clients at once. So This case, you’re looking for somebody who will fill up 50 to 80% of your time. And another good source is LinkedIn. LinkedIn always seems to be a good source there and a lot of my videos, LinkedIn, especially with a pro account, you’ll be able to find some great anchor clients, you just really have to understand who would you be able to serve as an anchor client. Now, why didn’t I put up work or Freelancer? Com? I’m not saying you can’t find anchor clients on those platforms. But you’re less likely to if you do a manual search for yourself on indeed or we work remotely. Why is that Upwork people go especially to Freelancer in fiber, they go for specific projects, they have a specific need, they need they need filled, they don’t have a specific position they need filled. Now, I’m not saying that’s not the case. I mean, I’ve found anchor clients and Upwork before on several occasions is not the issue. But if you go out and proactively look for anchor clients, meaning you have someone who is posting on indeed that they have a position to fill, but it’s not quite a full time position, and that it can be done remotely, you’re much more likely To find someone like that on indeed because those are people are looking for positions and not projects. Okay? And here’s a fact most employers are actually delighted to hire a contractor instead of a full time employee, and let those lawmakers keep doing what they’re doing because they’re making hiring employees very, very difficult, especially out here in California, and to a lesser, almost equal extent New York, but it’s cheaper because they don’t have to pay benefits or payroll taxes, your what’s called at will so they can get rid of you and anytime and you get rid of them and anytime there’s no like laws that said, you have to fire somebody in a certain way or a certain time. They won’t have to deal with layoffs or termination, should they no longer require your service that might seem scary to you. But really, as a freelancer, you might think, well, I don’t have enough job security you do as a freelancer, you have more job security than you would as an employee, because as an employee working full time for somebody, you have one employer, and if you get fired, you’re done. And it could be something that you have no control or maybe economic conditions, okay, but as a freelancer you get quote unquote, fired from a particular client. You Still got other clients you’re working with, right? So it’s not all you don’t have all your eggs in one basket. Right? Now your goal is to have two to three anchor clients at once. Okay, so ideally if you have to anchor clients making 80% of your income goal, then you’ll have a ton of job security and you don’t have any dry spells as long as you have those anchor clients because you’re guaranteed that that income from those those anchor clients Okay, so I hope that provides some clarity and good luck finding some anchor clients.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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In this episode, Mike explains how to find anchor clients. Anchor clients are those clients that you can rely on for consistent income. Those are the clients that pay well, pay on time and have a long term vision. In this episode, Mike explains how to find anchor clients. Anchor clients are those clients that you can rely on for consistent income. Those are the clients that pay well, pay on time and have a long term vision. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success … How to Find Anchor Clients Read More » Mike Volkin clean 5:50
An Interview With Jonathan Stark-Bye Bye Hourly Billing! https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-jon-stark-bye-bye-hourly-billing/ Tue, 05 Nov 2019 15:52:56 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6195 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-jon-stark-bye-bye-hourly-billing/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-jon-stark-bye-bye-hourly-billing/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Jonathan Stark is a former software developer who is now on a mission to rid the world of hourly billing. He is the author of Hourly Billing Is Nuts, the host of Ditching Hourly, and writes a daily newsletter on pricing for independent professionals. Questions 1.So you’ve written 5 books, you’ve given talks …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-jon-stark-bye-bye-hourly-billing/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview With Jonathan Stark-Bye Bye Hourly Billing!</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:
Jonathan Stark is a former software developer who is now on a mission to rid the world of hourly billing. He is the author of Hourly Billing Is Nuts, the host of Ditching Hourly, and writes a daily newsletter on pricing for independent professionals.
Questions

1.So you’ve written 5 books, you’ve given talks on 3 continents and you were a software consultant for major brands like Staples, Time, T-Mobile and more. By that time, anyone might see that you were a success. But then, you decided to go out on your own and on the very first year, doubled your income. Tell us about the high-level points on how you made that happen.
2.You have a course called Hourly Billing is Nuts, which I agree with. Tell me a bit about when you realized you didn’t want to trade your time for money.
3.Youre effective hourly rate is $2,000 per hour, can you explain what an effective hourly rate is and how someone can calculate theirs.
4.Tell us about your famous Jonathans Card experiment.
5.How can our audience follow you online?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Alright everybody thank you for joining me this is Mike Bolton with freelancers school and the lead instructor Freelancer masterclass. I have a special guest with us today. JOHN Stark, a former software developer who is now on a mission to rid the world of hourly billing something I rave rant and rave about in the master class. So he is the actually the author of hourly billing is nuts. The host of ditching hourly and writes a daily newsletter on pricing for independent professionals. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. So you’ve written five books, right? You have three talks on three continents, you’ve given you a software consultant for major brands like staples and in time and T Mobile

And other brands. And by that time, anyone might see that your success but then you decided to go out on your own and do the very first year, double your income once you go out on your own. Can you tell us about the high level points of how you work for major brands and then went out on your own and actually doubled your income? Oh, yeah, sure. I don’t want to misrepresent the timeline though. All of that stuff in the books and everything happened after I went out on my own. Okay, before that I was working in house at a software consulting, like a dev shop, was a firm that had about 10 employees. I was the vice president, by the time I worked my way up at the end, and that’s where we’re doing hourly billing. And that’s when the light bulb went on for me where I was like, wow, hourly billing is causing all of our problems, literally all of them. And, you know, I ended up leaving to start my own shop, I immediately went to value pricing, I immediately doubled my income. And then those things that you listed all happens starting in 2006 2007. Okay, so it took a couple of years right

from from the timeline

Were How long were you at the the agency for with the woman? 10 people? I think it’s about three years. Okay. So you spent three years just realizing that that hourly billing was the issue. And then you went off on your own and a long time to realize, yeah, that’s the crazy thing about hourly billing, it seems like the defect, it seems like the only way that’s the only option, it seems like so you don’t even question it. And then it creates all all sorts of problems. Almost all the problems that freelancers complain about. Yeah, absolutely. From hourly billing. I couldn’t agree more. I very rarely, if ever bill hourly now, just because of that, and some other reasons, which I’m sure we’ll talk about soon. So you have a course called hourly billing is not great. Great course, by the way. And he tell me a little bit about when you realize you didn’t want to trade your time for money. Was it when you’re at the agency or was it just after that when you went out on your own? It was at the end of the agency stint? So I was

like, my whole life there was ours. I was the vice president. So I was in charge of like, making hours you know, estimates based on hours for customers and clients. I was in charge of chasing

Developers for hours I you know, with them to get their timesheets in and create systems to track hours feed the hours into into the invoicing system that the hours weren’t in. We couldn’t invoice there’s all these things is hours, hours, hours all the time. Yes. And eventually, it occurred to me that our best developer, who we paid the most, we were probably losing money on. And because he’s really fast, he just nailed everything really quick, US fat, he was great. He was amazing. He could have worked anywhere. We were lucky to have them. And then we had this person who was a junior developer, basically an intern, who we were printing money with, because he was really slow. He had to do things three and four times to get it right. He had a great bedside manner and his clients were perfectly happy. And it just there was like something unfair about that it didn’t seem right. And you can do all these gymnastics in your mind to say like, Yeah, well, the really good developer attracts other developers and trains people and stuff. But as soon as you as soon as the light bulb went on for me, and it took a while, a couple of weeks of like really thinking about it. Finally, I questioned

bailing. And I thought, well, if we, if we use fixed prices, our best developer would be like the golden goose immediately, like, instantly. And we would want more awesome developers and we would be able to invest in training the juniors and making them really good. And all of a sudden, everything was in alignment. So I said, you know, I’m, you know, I was really good friends with the owner, I am still to this day. And I said, we should really switch over to a different model. And he was like, Okay, I get that logically. But I don’t know how we would make the change. Because hourly billing infects your entire firm. You’ve got systems built up around it, you’ve got incentives built up around it, the clients are incentivized to expect it. It’s very, very hard to switch. And to be fair, I don’t know if I would have been able to do it with a whole firm and all the systems so I said, All right, I’m going to see if I can do this on my own. I went solo. And immediately immediately was, I mean, not only would was my income higher, but my quality of life was dramatically improved. I mean, it is night and day, especially if you do repeatable work.

Right. So if you, for example, have a content marketing strategy that’s that is very similar, you’re about to create one that’s very similar for a client, you know, you would normally only take, I don’t know, five to 10 hours to build, one that just modify an existing one, rather than build one from scratch, which could take 30 or 40 hours, right. So what so your approach is basically get a really good scope of work up front, get a flat rate agreed upon, okay, what is, you know, the way that I, what you’re describing is fixed pricing based on time materials, or cost plus value pricing? Where is where you talk to the client, and you find out what is the value of the business outcome that they’re trying to achieve? And before I don’t talk about scope at all in a sales meeting, so when I, you know, when a prospect comes in, I set up a sales interview, I said, hey, let’s talk might be a good fit, but let’s make sure and I basically try and talk them out of working with me. I asked them, Why would you even want to do this, this is going to be a big project. This is going to be a big investment. This is going to take time away.

From your employees to have to collaborate with me, when I just not do this, what’s really so bad about not doing it? And they’ll tell you why. They’ll say, Well, you know, that’d be great. But our competitors are breathing down their neck or Amazon is entering our market, or we’ve got this new product. We’ve invested all this r&d, we need to launch it, you know, we don’t want to launch to crickets. So they have some good reason. Then you say, Well, why do we have to do it now? Is this really urgent? You just go through this list? I call it the why conversation, you ask all these questions about why, why, why. And once you have a sense of that, once you go through those questions, if you really do it, and you’re not thinking about scope, you’re not thinking about anything like that. You’re not thinking about how long it’s going to take you to do anything, you haven’t even decided what you’re going to do. Then at the end, you’re like, you’ve got a sense of whether or not you’ve got a sense of what needle they want moved. And you’ve got a sense of what your contribution to moving that needle might be. And you can say, Okay, I’m going to take all this information. I’m going to put together a proposal. I’ll get back to you

Wednesday, they say okay, then I sit down with a proposal. And I say, all right, back in the napkin, this is probably worth to them. Maybe not bottom line, maybe not tangible, but worth to them based on our conversation for round numbers, let’s say $100,000.

So then I would say, All right, I’m going to come up with three options for them based on $100,000 of annual worth, maybe not revenue, but worth and say, okay, that’s what it’s probably worth to them to the buyer, I’m going to come up with a $10,000 option, a $22,000 option and a $50,000 option. And then I’m going to think, what can I do for $10,000? If they give me a budget of $10,000? What could I do to move this needle that they want moved?

And then same thing with 22. And same thing with 50. So it’s backwards what most freelancers think most freelancers in a sales interview, are basically pitching themselves. They’re trying to convince the client that they should hire them. They’re trying to differentiate themselves from the next copywriter next developer down the road, right?

And it’s a very desperate approach, it gives you no leverage. And you don’t understand the value of what you’re selling all you all you understand or what they want. All you all you’re thinking about is like, how much time is it going to take me? And if and then you try and come up with an estimate, and then you hope that’s right, because if you go over the estimate, they’re going to start to get angry. So this approach of doing the value first allows you to optimize your delivery, it allows you to,

as you were alluding to, it allows you to do things in less time, they’re just as effective or more effective. Instead of if I sell an hour, how long is it going to take me to do it an hour? I can never optimize by selling time because that’s what you sold in your you have to do that. You have to honor it. Now, does this work across all verticals? Because, you know, as a marketing strategist, I can see how this would work for someone like me and I love providing options to people when I present them with a proposal. But let’s say a writer for example, who charges per word

Or they’re using charging per hour. And they have like 30 other writers competing for the same job? How does someone like them adopt this value based model? If possible? Yep. Yeah, it’s the exact same thing. So I have a student in my private coaching program who was exactly that a writer. And she had a client come to her who asked for a white paper, they said, We want a white paper. And she went into the meeting was like, Well, why do you want a white paper? Like I yes, I’m happy to write a white paper for you. But I want it to be effective. I want you to be glad you spent the money with me, I want you to have 100% customer satisfaction. So can you share with me why you want it so that I can be sure that when I write it, it achieves the outcomes that you’re looking for? So they have a conversation? It’s a business conversation. And she’s not she’s thinking, maybe I’ll do a white paper, maybe I won’t. Depends like it’s like the patient coming to the doctor and say, Hey, I need a triple bypass. Doctor doesn’t just do it. They say okay, maybe that’s something I’m going to do but you know, I’m going to diagnose the situation first. So she diagnosis that you have

And it’s a big situation, I don’t want to go into details because it’s not my place to do so. But, you know, client comes to her and asked for a white paper, and we’re sending out a proposal. The top option is $150,000.

Would anybody here charge $150,000? For a white paper? No, but that’s not what we’re that’s not what she’s describing in her, you know, deliverables or what the outcome is that she’s going to provide to them. Instead of saying, Here’s your white paper, thanks, bye, take my 1500 bucks or something or like, whatever, 25 cents a word. And you know, what, if those words are awful, like hourly or by the word or any other measure like that, it doesn’t take quality or effectiveness into consideration really, it’s like implied that it’s automatically going to be good. So when you start to actually talk about the difference between

you know, let’s, you know, why might someone want a white paper they probably want to generate leads, they probably want to increase awareness in the marketplace about their product or service. So

What metrics could you look at and discuss with them in a sales interview? Like, what’s this white paper for? What’s this new website for? What’s this? I don’t know, style guide for old for something, you know, we want to improve morale or we want our brand to be more consistent, or we want our partners to be able to download their invoices without having to call customer service. Well, why? Well, because the customers are complaining about it, they’re going to go to another another provider. So if you start talking about business things in the meeting, and not just how many words do you want it to be? Then you can start to speak the language of business, which is numbers and say, all right, how do we measure the success here, more leads, better Net Promoter Score something because businesses measure things, so you just need to figure out what they’re going to measure after you deliver this white paper or whatever. And say, like, Can I move that needle? can i improve that metric, and if you can, that will be worth money to them. And you just set your prices based on that. And that is a budget that you can then use to deliver whatever you think is

Going to move that needle for them. Yeah. What I like about that approach is you’re asking questions that maybe your competitors aren’t. Yeah. Because the way that you’re thinking about your pricing, they’re not. So you’re asking very detailed question, they’re automatically going to be impressed with you that you’re trying to get to the bare bones of why you’re doing that project in the first place. You know, what, a lot of times, clients don’t even know why they’re doing it. They just know it needs to be done. And they don’t know the scope of it. Although that’s that’s also something to as you can tell them, you know, hey, there’s a lot more behind this, the more business implications for not doing this, and you might realize, then you can start talking about it. They’re like, Oh, wow, yeah, this guy really knows what he’s talking about. So yeah, you have to you have to work with them to uncover Yes, core motivation. They don’t, they almost never know it unless you’re talking to the CEO and the CEO is extremely self aware. It’s extremely unusual. You need they just, they just jump to tactics. And they, they have a gut instinct or something and they haven’t thought it through. And then exactly like you said, you will differentiate yourself from virtually

everyone out there who might be a competitor of yours by simply asking questions about why would you want to do this yet? Because all of a sudden the client that and the power frameshift Well, you’re not desperate for this work. Why aren’t you begging me to just like close this deal? Why aren’t we why why aren’t I just trying to chisel down your hourly rate? Why not? Why aren’t I like saying, Oh, this is going to be great exposure for you because we’re a big brand. Reason is like all the sudden as the freelancer you flip the frame, where you’re like, you kind of acting like you don’t need the job. Maybe you do. Maybe you don’t. The fact of the matter is you shouldn’t be taking on jobs, where without confirming for yourself, or at least feeling confident that you can improve their business somehow. Like if you’re just gonna like, yeah, sure, you know, I’ll do 10 hours for you. And like not even care if it helps them. That’s, that’s not great. That’s not a fun way. Unfortunately, that’s the reason why freelancing is by and large, a part time gig because that’s the reason why freelancers a lot of freelance

Just think like that right? And they don’t they don’t have to shift the what you’re doing in that case is you’re actually turning the the conversation to where you’re dictating it as opposed to the clients, which is very powerful. But you’re, you’re effectively, your hourly rate, your effective hourly rate is $2,000. an hour. Right. So well, can you explain what that that is? Yeah, I mean, that I know that’s on my website. And what what that is, is,

that’s reverse engineering. Like, let’s say I do a one hour talk, and I get $2,000 for it. That was my effective hourly rate would be $2,000. And I do things all the time would way higher than $2,000, where I’ll put in some amount of time. And it’s just, it’s ridiculous. I mean, the profitability is insane. But the client is sorry. The client is super happy, because they got more out of it than the $2,000 for the one hour. Yes. So I do these, like $500 phone calls with people and just they get off the phone and they’re just like, you just transformed my business in like 30 minutes. And that’s, you know, and I’ll say to them, and it’s 100% money.

guarantee, I’ll say like, if you get to this phone call and you don’t feel like it was worth it, I’ll give you your money back. Because I’m sure I can blow their mind. Like, I know I’m going to do it because I have confidence in a very, very specific niche, very specific thing with a very specific kind of customer. So I’m really confident that I can help them. And when they jump on, and they say, I’ve never had to give anybody their money back ever, because every time we find something that’s like a mind blowing path forward for them. That is, well well worth the money. Yeah. Would they be happier if I took two weeks to do the same thing? No, that would be worse. I had a client that hired me many years ago to create a content marketing strategy. It took me about three months because just the amount of detail that this person wanted in revisions was just insane. I charge them a very hefty fee for it, and they gladly pay for it as a great result. But now I have this guideline that whenever anybody hires me for a content marketing strategy, now I use it as the base. It’s 80% done, I just use the last 20

To customize it, and I charge the same amount, it takes me one 20th of the time it did when I created it, but I charge the same amount. So you know, it’s something common there too. So if you use this, if you do some work that’s repeatable and predictable, then you can do that as well. Right? This is really true in the software world. I don’t know how true it is. In the copywriting world, I imagine it’s fairly common. But in the software world, there’s this concept of like using open source repos or creating your own starter library. Why would you do that? Why would you even buy a faster computer if you’re a billing by the hour, you should have the slowest possible computer. It doesn’t make any sense to spend $4,000 on a top of the line Mac Book, if you’re charging by the hour, but and yet people do it. Because they there’s this weird like, like, the normal way. I think the the normal way that you’re almost like your biology exists is that you want to be more efficient. Maybe it’s just software developers, but nobody likes doing busy work. Like I don’t think anybody likes that. The only time you like it is when it makes you money. If it wasn’t making you money,

You wouldn’t do it. So when you switch over to a value pricing model or really any kind of fixed model, however you calculate the price. All of a sudden every minute you work you’re losing money instead of every minute you work in making money and guess what? You get really efficient really fast. Yep. Yeah, it’s so competitive out there. I just hired two copywriters last month to write a blog post very similar. And their hourly rates were vastly different. One was three times higher than the other. They both delivered pretty much the same work product but one charged me three times as much because it took them three times as long to do I’m like why does take you so much longer than this other writers pretty much the same assignment. So you when you’re

when you’re charging hourly, or when you’re hiring hourly, you really don’t know what you’re getting you don’t how fast people work or how slow they work, how many revisions you’re going to need. It’s super frustrating from his nuts perspective. Yeah, nuts. It says people again, what’s the question they ask a client comes in, they say the first thing they want to know is what’s your hourly rate. And that’s only half the equation. I know how fast I can work.

You know, right? It’s not and it’s not even half the work because it’s not even half the equation because there’s no conversation about quality at all. It’s just assume that it’s going to it’s going to achieve this metric that’s buried in the clients mind that they never reveal to the freelancer unless press don’t even know. Yeah, yeah, you have to work to get it out. And if you don’t, what are the odds that you’re going to like, sink a three point shot in a completely darkened basketball court? Yeah. Like zero, close to zero. That’s what you’re doing. You’re shooting baskets in the dark? Yeah, if you don’t know what they’re trying to achieve. Yep. So it’s actually

mean to not figure that out. It’s it’s not theft. But it’s, it’s not unethical because everybody’s eyes are wide open about the deal. Like I’m going to pay you 100 bucks an hour or I’m going to pay you 25 cents a word or whatever the going rate is, and you’re going to do this thing and I believe that you’re going to spend the time but there everybody’s talking about the wrong thing.

nobody’s talking about how we’re going to make the client’s business better. Yeah, better than the thousand dollars they pay me. So if if I give you five bucks, and you give me a Starbucks coffee back, that’s a fair trade like, I’m happy. I’m happier than the five bucks. I’m happier without the five bucks. But the coffee. Yes, it’s a mutually profitable exchange. Starbucks is happier with the five bucks because the coffee only cost them $1. Probably if that. So everybody’s happy. It’s mutually profitable. That’s why both people say thank you when you buy something and as a little store, they both say thanks, because both people just profited. So if you’re if you’re working with clients, and you don’t figure out how to deliver more value to them, then they gave to you, you’re going to constantly be operating at razor thin margins with grumpy clients. Yes, you guys what happens trying to compete with everyone else out there? So yeah, I love the approach. Tell me about the the Jonathan’s card experiment or tell our audience about though it’s very interesting. Yeah, it’s a long time.

I’ll just I’ll try and summarize it. It’s unrelated to any of this. It was just a weird thing that happened to me. Okay. Yeah, it was like I was doing mobile work after when the iPhone came out, I switched from, you know, my specialty was mobile web development, mobile web consulting. And I was doing a test for a big client in mobile payments. And Starbucks was the only one doing it at the time. And this barcode, you could show on your iOS app. And I was like, I want to try this on my Android phone too. But they don’t have an Android app. So I just took a screenshot of the iOS app. And then I was like, I wonder if I can pay with this photo, which I did, which blew my mind at the time. It seems normal now. But at the time, it was mind blowing that I bought a coffee with a picture. And I blogged about it, and I put the picture on my blog, so anybody could download it and go buy a coffee. And like 20 people immediately got up from their desks and used up the 50 bucks I had on my card. So and they started tweeting at me like, Oh, you tricked me. There’s no money on the card. And I was like, oh, what happened?

And then I realized that it got used up and put 50 more bucks on it immediately disappeared. I put 100 bucks on it immediately disappeared. So then I blogged about it. And I could talk about this for an hour. The bottom line is, within a couple of days, it was on the front page of cnn.com. And I was getting phone calls from like Al Roker and like, like syndicated radio talk shows, to talk about this sort of experiment social giving. Wow, that’s, that’s really interesting how everything, something like that goes viral. Right? So tell me about I’m really interested in your coaching program and learning how freelancers can benefit from it. Can you tell me a little about that and how our audience can follow you online? Sure. My private coaching program is for its it’s probably not for freelancers. It’s more it’s, it’s kind of expensive, honestly. And it’s for people, usually who are running firms and already writing proposals and need help value pricing the proposals instead of doing just, you know, time and materials or hourly estimates. What is the one you’re working with a writer you mentioned earlier? Was that part of your coaching program? Is that Yeah, okay. Right. So

That really it’s that that program pays for itself. People are already sending, you know, a proposal proposal a month. I mean, I’ve students who credit me with buying their house with one proposal. So you know, it needs to be needs to be, you need to be getting leads already, if you want to really benefit from private code, or Ideally, you want to be getting leads. And then I have the pricing seminar, which is actually my course, where it’s a group thing online, people can sign up and sort of talk about topics like this for it’s 50 videos over 100 days. And we go through all these topics with a group, you know, so it’s a bunch of would be a bunch of freelancers, and we all sort of work through step by step by step understanding each of these concepts. And it’s all about the value based pricing. It’s all on this map. It’s it’s, it focuses quite a bit on that, but we also get into product or services, writing sales pages, nurture campaigns, opt in forms, sales, funnels, all everything. It’s fun. Yeah, it’s really what is that called? The pricing seminar, the pricing seminar and what webinar or what website can they find that as Oh, that’s it, the pricing seminar calm, but

The best place but I don’t want to sell my junk on this podcast, like the place where people should go for free stuff is the value pricing is value pricing, boot camp calm. And if you’re interested in any of these things for free, you can go there and download this download sign up for and get an email course. And I if you reply to any of the messages with questions or anything like that immediate, you know, go straight to my inbox or reply to you get you unstuck. And then after that you can opt to go on my regular daily mailing list that I’ve been doing for I don’t know, four years without you know, I haven’t missed a day and three and a half, four years. Wow. So yeah, that’s that’s a commitment right there. That’s good. I love it. I’m going in the next 10 minutes to sign up for that value. I’m sorry, value priced seminar, calm value pricing bootcamp. Value pricing, boot camp calm. Excellent. Well, thanks so much for joining me today. I’m hoping to talk to you more in the future. You get a lot of great advice I’m sure we didn’t even be talked about yet. My pleasure. Thanks. Bye.

Thank you for joining us.

For freelancing school, be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Jonathan Stark is a former software developer who is now on a mission to rid the world of hourly billing. He is the author of Hourly Billing Is Nuts, the host of Ditching Hourly, and writes a daily newsletter on pricing for independent prof... Show Notes: Jonathan Stark is a former software developer who is now on a mission to rid the world of hourly billing. He is the author of Hourly Billing Is Nuts, the host of Ditching Hourly, and writes a daily newsletter on pricing for independent professionals. Questions 1.So you’ve written 5 books, you’ve given talks … An Interview With Jonathan Stark-Bye Bye Hourly Billing! Read More » Mike Volkin clean 24:17
An interview with Avani Miriyala – Get More Freelance Clients! https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-avani-miriyala-get-more-freelance-clients/ Wed, 23 Oct 2019 18:55:16 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=6136 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-avani-miriyala-get-more-freelance-clients/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-avani-miriyala-get-more-freelance-clients/feed/ 0 Show Notes Watch the YouTube version of this interview here. Avani is a business coach for freelancers. She’s on a mission to help service-based entrepreneurs get more clients and scale sustainably to 6-figures and beyond. Avani runs her own UX Strategy Consultancy, Avani Miriyala Strategy + Design, and is the host of the 6-Figure Freelancer …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-avani-miriyala-get-more-freelance-clients/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Avani Miriyala – Get More Freelance Clients!</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Watch the YouTube version of this interview here.

Avani is a business coach for freelancers. She’s on a mission to help service-based entrepreneurs get more clients and scale sustainably to 6-figures and beyond. Avani runs her own UX Strategy Consultancy, Avani Miriyala Strategy + Design, and is the host of the 6-Figure Freelancer Podcast.

Questions
1. Before we talk about some tips for freelancers, I think it’s important for our audience to understand your background. Can you tell us a bit about your corporate tech career?
2. What is your niche? What kind of clients do you like to serve?
3. What is your favorite part about working for yourself?
4. Give our audience some tips about how to increase their revenue as a freelancer $25,000 next year
5. Tell me about the client magnet roadmap
6. How can our audience follow you online?


Transcript

An Interview with Avani Miriyala

Today we’re going to talk to Avani Miriyala, a business coach for freelancers who is on a mission to help service-based entrepreneurs get more clients. She will also give us tips on how to earn six figures or more doing freelancing jobs. She runs her own UX Strategy Consultancy called Avani Miriyala Strategy + Design and hosts the 6-Figure Freelancer Podcast. Check out my interview with her:

Mike: Hi Avani, welcome to Freelancer Masterclass. Just to let you know, I first knew you through your podcast, Six-Figure Freelancer. I learned a lot from your talk and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to grow his income to six figures. But before that, can you tell us about your corporate background?

Avani: First of all, thank you for listening to my podcast. Well, I have a degree in Industrial Design, which is my passport for working with so many amazing tech companies. I love working for the tech industry because there are so many things to learn. I love challenging myself to understand consumer behavior and what products can fit into the market’s demand.

I was part of an in-house UX designer where I did both qualitative and quantitative testing, doing interviews, and getting to work with the product development team. From there, I leaped a startup company from Texas, a delivery company called Favor, which is similar to Uber Eats, DoorDash and Postmates. With Favor, I was the only in-house designer. I had no one else to talk to so all the planning and execution was under my wings. I was omly given $500 to do formal testing, like what would I do with it? I figured out everything on my own until it reached the point that I felt like I was stagnant. With those experiences in my bag, I decided to do freelancing in UX and product design and I liked it.

Mike: Your niche is UX product design for small to midsize companies, am I correct?

Avani: It’s twofold; we are a UX and product design agency for consumer-facing tech companies. We also expand to cover crypto and blockchain technology companies.

Mike: You mentioned that you like having the time by yourself or, I guess, dictating your own time. Is that your favorite part of freelancing or something else?

Avani: I love being able to nap when I want to but there’s so much going on I don’t have all the time every day. As a freelancer, I get to do it if I want to do it like today. Or I don’t have to ask somebody if I can go on vacation for example. Just those little things and having the control with how much money I want to make. I really believe that money is a tool for impact so I love being able to learn how to do that myself and share with other people.

Mike: Can you leave our audience today with some tips on how to increase their Freelancer income, say $25,000 or more next year if that’s their goal for 2020? What advice would you give anyone out there listening to increase their income?

Avani: Always start with a goal; say your goal is 25,000 per quarter. As a freelancer, you have to realize that to achieve that goal; you need to develop your business. You can’t settle for what you have right now; you need to look for new clients regularly. If you are not getting enough clients, your revenue will remain the same. Take some time every day to look for a new client. Block one hour of each day for searching, making a follow-up, writing resumes, and other money-making tasks.

Do your job consistently every day, except during your rest days. When you do your job each day, you polish your skills. You avoid making the same error you did a few days ago. In short, you become a master of your craft. If you focus on your work and do the task religiously, there will be more clients coming your way and offering you better deals.

Mike: That’s a great tip. I always say in my MasterClass to make a schedule of your day and do the tasks in the calendar. If you do it every day, it sharpens your mind, and it becomes a part of your routine. At first, it will be difficult. It’s like creating your YouTube channel, and start promoting it but nobody listens. It’s disheartening, but just stick to it a little bit.

Avani: Absolutely, we’re both a testament to that.

Mike: Tell me a little bit about the client magnet roadmap. It seems very interesting to me.

Avani: The client magnet roadmap is what I’ve been using in my business. It’s the framework that I use to have a steady flow of clients coming in and it’s simply a set of systems. I would say that you can put it in place and they’re really simple. Part of the system is being able to schedule in your calendar that you’re reaching out to a certain number of people per week. It also shows you how to demonstrate value for a potential client without going and doing a project for them. The framework will show you how you can have a steady flow coming in or become a client magnet. It’s a free roadmap that anyone can grab online on my website, avanimiriyala.com/free.

Mike: Great, so that’s for free. But is it like an eight-week guide? How long does it take to complete it?

Avani: It’s a few pages of a roadmap, and what it gives you are the steps of what you need to do. But if you’re serious about taking this to the next level, at the end of the roadmap, I can give you a link to join a free class that I have. And it’s an ongoing class that I do, which then goes into details, like the strategies and the things that you can take action on based on the roadmap itself. If you want that 25K extra, feel free to join the class. You should be able to walk away and know exactly what you’re going to do next.

Mike: That’s why I asked you about it because I know you’re full of actionable tips based on your podcast. So how can our audience follow you online? Tell us where to get a hold of you.

Avani: You can hang out with me over on the Six Figure Freelancer podcast. I just recorded some really amusing episodes yesterday. It’s out every Wednesday and Thursday. I’m on Instagram too. I love hanging out over there. Just search for my name Avani Miriyala on Instagram.

Mike: That’s great. We got your podcast; you got your client magnet roadmap; you got a lot of stuff going on. I’ll let you do your own thing. And thank you so much for joining us.

Avani: Thank you for having me here. I’ll definitely follow your Freelancer Masterclass. Bye!

 

 

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Show Notes Watch the YouTube version of this interview here. Avani is a business coach for freelancers. She’s on a mission to help service-based entrepreneurs get more clients and scale sustainably to 6-figures and beyond. Show Notes Watch the YouTube version of this interview here. Avani is a business coach for freelancers. She’s on a mission to help service-based entrepreneurs get more clients and scale sustainably to 6-figures and beyond. Avani runs her own UX Strategy Consultancy, Avani Miriyala Strategy + Design, and is the host of the 6-Figure Freelancer … An interview with Avani Miriyala – Get More Freelance Clients! Read More » Mike Volkin 14:47
An interview with Melanie Padgett Powers: Finding your Niche as a Freelance Writer https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-melanie-padgett-powers-finding-your-niche-as-a-freelance-writer/ Tue, 22 Oct 2019 14:40:14 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5929 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-melanie-padgett-powers-finding-your-niche-as-a-freelance-writer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-melanie-padgett-powers-finding-your-niche-as-a-freelance-writer/feed/ 0 Show Notes Melanie Padgett Powers is the owner of MelEdits. She is a freelance writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., area. She primarily works with membership associations and health care organizations. She is also the host of the Deliberate Freelancer podcast, which focuses on the business side of freelancing and aims to inspire freelancers …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-melanie-padgett-powers-finding-your-niche-as-a-freelance-writer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Melanie Padgett Powers: Finding your Niche as a Freelance Writer</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Melanie Padgett Powers is the owner of MelEdits. She is a freelance writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., area. She primarily works with membership associations and health care organizations. She is also the host of the Deliberate Freelancer podcast, which focuses on the business side of freelancing and aims to inspire freelancers to think and act like business owners.

-There are so many freelance writers on there, how did you find your niche and take your own path so you don’t have to worry about your competition?
– Why do you like to attend so many conferences? Are there any you would recommend for freelancers?
-How are your head of resources and head of security doing these days? 🙂
-Tell me about the Deliberate Freelancer podcast and its mission
-how important is a blog to a freelancer?
-How can our audience follow you online?


Transcript

Today, we have a special guest. Melanie Padgett Powers is the owner of meledits. a freelance writer and editor in the Washington DC area. She primarily works with membership associations and healthcare organizations. She is also the host of the Deliberate Freelancer podcast, one of my favorites. She focuses on the business side of freelancing and aims to inspire freelancers to think and act like business owners, which is something I continuously repeat to my students at Freelancer Masterclass.

Mike: Let’s talk about Deliberate Freelancer. How long is it? How often do you update it?

Melanie:  I just launched it in March of this year. I had been wanting to do a podcast and dreaming about doing a podcast for a year and finally just said, I have to launch it. I can’t just keep thinking about it and planning and being very deliberate, and I need to begin. It comes out every Thursday.

Some of the episodes are solo; some I have guests. I have an editor who’s super helpful. But it’s all about the business side of freelancing. It’s for any Freelancer in any industry at any level, who wants to focus on building and growing their business. My big mantra is you need to step back and analyze your business and have structures, processes and a business plan. Plus, you need to market and network. I really like to analyze where I am and change things up and make sure that I’m doing the work that I love and not working for clients that I don’t like.  I try to pass on all that advice to my audience.

Mike:  How did you find a niche? What advice can you give to other freelancers who don’t know what niche they want?

Melanie: I had never really dreamt of being a freelancer. I was a newspaper reporter years ago, and then I spent 13 years at membership associations working my way up. I hated my last job, and I wanted out, but I didn’t see any opening for the job that I’m passionate about. So, I decided to go freelance.

I told everyone I know that I do freelance writing because you never know where work will come from. I got a couple of clients right away.  I was fortunate from the beginning that I had this network that I hadn’t planned on building, but just because I’ve been in associations for so long and in the DC area for so long, that it worked out. I also have a diversity of services. I am not one that wants to write all day long. I love writing, but I can’t imagine doing it all day long.

Journalism can be where the prestige is. You can try to get into the New York Times and The Washington Post, but you can’t make a living doing that every day as a freelancer. I also love being an editor. It’s been helpful that I have managing editing services. I do copy editing for a select group of clients, I proofread magazines, and then I also do write. And in the beginning, I even did social media management. But after a while, I decided to pull back from that but it was really helpful by giving me a way to connect with clients.

Mike: You have mentioned telling everyone you know that you’re a freelancer. That’s what I did when I started as a freelancer. I talked about it so many times in my Freelance Masterclass. It’s very important to market yourself to everyone because you never know which one needs your service or knows somebody who can hire you.

I noticed that you love attending writers’ conferences to expand your network. How can it help a writer improve his craft? Many freelancers are introverts. Would you advise that they also participate in these meetings?

Melanie: I’m also an introvert, so I understand why many freelancers are hesitant. The good thing about going into a writers’ meet-up is that many of them are introverts, too. They are the kind of people who are just like you. You can meet a lot of writers, editors, and social media personalities that can be a good source for potential clients.

Make yourself a part of a community for writers. It’s a perfect way for networking and building relationships with other people like you. Sometimes, you also need to meet new people. Though I know you love working at home alone with your cats and dogs, it can get lonely sometimes. You need people to ignite those ideas back.

By going to many conferences, I can connect with other writes on social media and ask them questions or advice, so that network has been invaluable to me.

The best part is I can get work from other writers and editors who have passed on referrals or jobs that aren’t right for them. It’s great when I meet my clients at a conference, and then they pull someone over and say, “Melanie works for me. You should hire her.” I can’t buy that kind of marketing, right?

Mike: Correct. Speaking of cats and dogs, what I found interesting on your website is how your personality comes out. And I noticed you’ve appointed your cat the head sources and head of security. How are they doing?

Melanie: They’re good. They’re out of the room right now; I’m hoping they don’t bust through the door.  They like to hang out with me. I have two cats and I work from home. Slinky is the HR Director because she’s super friendly and chatty. Anytime someone comes to the house, she wants to be friends. The other one, Bella, is the head of security because she likes to sit on the back of our couch overlooking the street and keep an eye on everything all day long.

Mike: So, tell me how important a blog is to a freelancer

Melanie: I like my blog, and I keep having plans to revive it. But of course, like every other thing that you don’t get paid for, it’s at the end of the list. Right?

I think the important thing is to pick a few things that you enjoy because if you enjoy it, you’ll do it. I’m on Twitter all the time. I love Twitter. You don’t have to make me go on Twitter. You don’t have to remind me to go on Twitter. I’m just naturally there building relationships.

The blog is funny because I am a writer, but I write for money. And when I’m done writing for my clients, I don’t always want to write for myself. Now other writers feel very differently. They want that time to write for themselves.  My best advice is to know for yourself if you’re going to keep up the blog because I think consistency is the main thing.

Mike: Yep, consistency and a reason, like why would you be blogging? One of the things I do to maintain consistency is I make it a rule to live and die on my calendar. If it’s on my schedule, I know I’m going to do it. Like the gym, for example, I used to be in fitness and so many people come to me and ask me how I manage to do it regularly. Well, I put it on my calendar, and I’m committed to doing it, except during an emergency.  And it works. I think that’s the same thing with blogging.

So how can our audience find you online? How can they learn more about you?

Melanie:  You can go to my website, which is meledits.com, you can find my podcast there, Deliberate Freelancer, or you can go directly to deliberatefreelancer.com. Find me on Twitter, meledits. I’m always there.

 

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Show Notes Melanie Padgett Powers is the owner of MelEdits. She is a freelance writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., area. She primarily works with membership associations and health care organizations. Show Notes Melanie Padgett Powers is the owner of MelEdits. She is a freelance writer and editor in the Washington, D.C., area. She primarily works with membership associations and health care organizations. She is also the host of the Deliberate Freelancer podcast, which focuses on the business side of freelancing and aims to inspire freelancers … An interview with Melanie Padgett Powers: Finding your Niche as a Freelance Writer Read More » Mike Volkin 12:37
An interview with Michael Brooks, founder of goLance https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-brooks-founder-of-golance/ Thu, 17 Oct 2019 15:35:37 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5691 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-brooks-founder-of-golance/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-brooks-founder-of-golance/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Michael Brooks is a successful digital investor and entrepreneur, Michael carries with him over 17 years of experience in FinTech, payment processing and digital marketing. Michael finds new strategic business solutions through software development and electronic payments. He is the founder and of two global brands: the popular subscription billing and digital marketing …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-michael-brooks-founder-of-golance/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Michael Brooks, founder of goLance</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Michael Brooks is a successful digital investor and entrepreneur, Michael carries with him over 17 years of experience in FinTech, payment processing and digital marketing. Michael finds new strategic business solutions through software development and electronic payments.
He is the founder and of two global brands: the popular subscription billing and digital marketing platform Response CRM. and global freelancing network, goLance.

goLance was launched in 2015 and has paid out more than $63 million to its recipients.
Response CRM has 300 plus e-commerce clients worldwide.

Michael is also the author of two published books on electronic payments and digital currency
Questions
-How important is it for a freelancer to maintain a good reputation?
-What can a freelancer do to maintain a good reputation?
-How should a freelancer diffuse conflict with a client?
-What are some common mistakes freelancers make?
-How can our audience learn more about you?


Raw Transcipt

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

All right. Thank you for joining me everybody. I’m Mike Volkin, host of freelancers school and lead instructor Freelancer masterclass. Today, we have with us michael brooks, a very successful digital investor and entrepreneur, Michael carries with him over 17 years of experience in FinTech payment processing, digital marketing, and Michael finds new strategic business solutions through software development and electronic payments and we’re going to talk about that. In addition to some advice he has for freelancers, he is the founder of two global brands, the popular subscription billing and digital marketing platform called response CRM and global freelancing network called golems, which I’m now a proud member of, as of this morning, I signed

And Gold Rush was launched in 2015, and has paid more than 63 million to its recipients. And response. CRM, by the way, has 300 plus e commerce clients worldwide. So if you own or want to start an e commerce company, be sure to check out response CRM. Michael is the author of two published books, which we’ll talk about one’s on electronic payments, and the other one is on digital currency. Welcome to the show, Michael. Thank you, Mike. It’s a pleasure to be here with you. It’s a pleasure to be on this program. I really appreciate it. Thank you. Thank you. I have to address this right from the start. This is the coolest background I’ve ever had. You’ve got a night where are you right now and tell us tell us how you got there. And and why that if you can’t explain that night, that’d be cool. But I understand you can’t. Absolutely. So this was in the castle that we rented. We have a nine room castle here with the 18 of us rented, rented a castle and we just kind of meet up and we all work and but it’s a combination of business owners and freelancers.

Live in affiliate marketing, and we just kind of go places around the world and meet up and do cool stuff. So this will divine on Airbnb get really good prices on castles if they’re in the middle of nowhere. But this is actually centrally located the machine castle in Ireland. And it’s just been a great week and everyone kind of does their own thing, but we get time to spend together and we’re meeting up after this with another group in Croatia, on an island called brush with lawyers and software developers, people from all around the world. And my friends from here are going to Munich for Oktoberfest. So we just kind of go and like we really live true to our core which is

freedom where you want to go and and work where you want to work every my kids with me so I’ve got a wife and two, great. We homeschool and bring them with us. So it’s it really is a lifestyle choice. That’s great. And I’ve been on that island in Croatia. It’s freaking unbelievable.

I love to travel to. So hopefully I can work my way into your group there. That sounds very exciting, although I do have a 10 week old at home, so I don’t know how much traveling I’m going to be doing next few months, but

let’s definitely keep in touch. So you obviously have a very good reputation out there. You’ve been doing digital marketing and other things for a very long time. How important is it for a freelancer to maintain a good reputation? It’s everything. Right? It’s, it’s easy to lose it one one mistake. I mean, this is a experience that wisdom, you know, I’ve been I’ve been working since I was 19. building businesses since I was 19. And, you know, a mistake can cost you a decade. So be really careful who you work with the type of projects you take, and then also contributing constantly and constantly doing things like this podcast, you know, we get to know each other we’re getting, we’re getting exposure, getting to talk, all that thing, builds up reputation, reputation is essentially something worthless.

Yeah, wants to know who you are, do you have do you value what people say about you, your reputation, your reputation, use your credit. So that’s a that’s, again very hard to build, very easy to lose. So there’s rules that you want to processes and, and things you want to think about when you’re when you’re taking on work. And when you’re taking on a freelancer to find that you’re equally yoked and that you’re, you’re both aligned in Division professional. Yep. We talked about Freelancer reputation in the master class. And one of the things I say is that don’t underestimate how one bad review of you or posting of you out there could hurt your in damage your company, because you have to think of yourself as a company. So I didn’t want to make makes make it clear to our audience that one, even bad review, even if it’s not justified could really hurt your reputation. And speaking of that, though, that leads into my next question, What can a freelancer do from your perspective to maintain a good reputation?

Well, it’s it’s, it’s challenging, right, and we face the same challenge. So we’re on trustpilot. And, and we care a lot about our reviews, some of the other guys care a lot, also some don’t care at all. And we go in and if somebody gets a bad review, I personally will go in and ask them why, what we can do to change it. What was their experience? And we’ve learned a lot from that. We’re not in the luxury position of rejecting people and accepting people, we have to let people work as long as they meet our requirements, we’re going to work with them. But a freelancer and a client have the luxury of saying, You know what, I don’t necessarily know that I’m going to take this you know, or

and that’s, that’s tough because the freelancer wants work right there. They’re there. They don’t want the job of going out and finding work because that’s easy to do their hours, the hours and the time, the time is their money. And so if they get presented with something, a job, something that seems really good. You really want to take a look at the people behind it.

You want to look at what what they’ve done and see what protections you can put in place. Even saying, hey, look, I like you, I wanted to test to see how we work together because like you said, one bad review from one nasty person can hurt. And and it’s and it’s damaging. And it’s, you know, a lot of times, especially in this world, there’s a sickness that we’re trying to cure. And that is that you’re over there. I’m over here, I don’t really know.

You know,

people are less likely to do damage or spew nastiness of somebody that they can look at the face and look at the rights to recognize their humanity. But how do you recognize the humanity of someone? You thought you were paying $500 for a website, and what they delivered you was not what you were thinking, even if it was they were thinking there was no meeting of minds you were blank. Right. So clarity of project, clarity of expectations, lots of good work, if you have to take on clients where you’re not sure about him clarity of x

vacations and snippets constant check ins, is this your direction? Is this What’s going on? This is the expectations constantly checking those. So you don’t have to walk back or cancel a project, which is possible. But I would say the number one thing, even if even if somebody’s not the greatest, the number one thing is is professionalism. And that’s the one thing you can control. Right. And it will probably have the greatest impact is just be professional. I’ve seen it. We’ve seen people that have made mistakes. We’ve seen people that have clients that are not aren’t happy. We’ve seen people that have made clients really happy but one consistent thing they do is behave in a professional manner and and hold themselves to up to a higher caliber. And that’s a that’s, I’d say that’s probably the most impactful factor. Yeah, when it doesn’t take much training either. Right? being professional,

self discipline, Warren Buffett has a excellent he said something I’ve read it on Facebook.

said that if you can’t control your if you can’t control your emotions, you can’t control your money. We’ve all had. We wanted to say things because of the way they made us feel. But if you’re in a position in somebody’s hands you trust of their project, their work. Whatever happens professionalism wins. Yeah, no. But but most of the time that part’s disease. Yep. And early communication. That was another point that you brought up that super important. So I like that I didn’t get a chance yet to introduce the audience to go Lance, can you tell me a little bit about go Lance and its value prop? Sure. I’d love to, like I mentioned, I founded response CRM, and that company a few years back, I turned to taking on a partner, someone that took more and more of the responsibility and I’m almost completely out of responsibility there. And and I started looking around, I’d written two books on electronic payments and digital currency. I was kind of like, what am I

Going to do with my life. And I started walking things backwards saying, Well, how much longer do I want to work? So I guess it 40 years I can where I was 3536 41. Now, I’m going well, I could work another 40 years, right? That’s I’m not going to quit from 75.

I don’t plan to so if I was going to do something for the next 40 years, what would I want to do? And I used other freelance platforms out there, and I love this space. It was a burgeoning space. It’s it still is. I love the payments aspect, lower fees, faster payments, that’s what we’re about. But it was like we when you can commit and obligate yourself to such a long term vision. It helps lay a foundation that you wouldn’t normally like if you have heavy investor demands and things of that sort. So we’ve been able to make decisions that say,

you know what, we’re

We’re going to take things slower. We’re going to look at the long play well, how are we going to fix things and get the best experience? for the long run? How are we position ourselves for the next 40 years now for the next 35 years, and with the people I worked on with, with response, I said, you know, if I’m going to do this, I’d like to give half the company away to our community, because I think that’s the best way to build

a company. So I went to my attorney and I said, How do I give away half the stock and I want to create a formula that issue stock based upon someone’s value to the business and he just thought I’d be in the business of issuing stock and we’d have massive lower fees probably gets too long. So I scrapped that idea I actually wrote before even heard the term Ico or even ripple who we work with now. We wrote a cryptocurrency. We’re like, hey, well, what if we gave away this coin? It was kind of like Bitcoin is Thursday. It’s that time and my second book, I finished my second book on digital currency.

Like, now you know what, we’re going to go build a business first, and then we may introduce that later. And we still met, we still might issue a coin as an incentive. But right now we do things like cashback, we’re constantly lowering fees, which is great, and that’s a real benefit to our community. It doesn’t end cashback lower fees, we pay referral fees, and we do what we can to help build our community organically. But it’s for the long run. I will say the the number one most impactful thing that go Lance has on the industry is we go there. And when I say that, I mean I’ve gone as far as on Siberia. So we started we found some really talented PHP developer how to arm Siberia, which is nowhere you ever really want to go it’s old. And there’s lots of reasons that together I unless you’re on a train through but

I had some time to that region. And when you’re traveling as I’m sure

You had, you know, you don’t like being away from your family too long. But there are times where you’re stuck three or four days or over a weekend you have, you have time between your meetings or conferences. And I was like, You know what, this guy out here, he’s all the way, way down there. Part of Earth I’ve never even contemplate going to. But he’s really good guy. And he’s delighting our clients and I want to go meet it. So I called him I flew out there and stayed at his house and his family. And then you know, he’s made over $800,000 on our platform now, just because we’ve been able to refer him and recommend him and he moved down to Poland with his family which is probably that something could have done had we not taken such an interest in impacted his life and that’s been the the number one cure for the what I consider to the sickness of the industry. That’s really cool. What does he do? He’s a PHP developer. And so but he’s created little companies on go last because you can create companies on go Lance and he’s hazal split.

Contracts because you can do split payment contracts. And he has his team of subcontractors, and he’s built his business and his team. And so we took a really solid solopreneur and turned him into an entrepreneur. And now he’s has a process by which he checks their work he delivers for clients, he’s maintain that high quality, but he’s been able to grow his revenues. I love that. That’s very cool. Thanks. We do as much of that as we can. Yeah, I love how you’re being careful about how you scale. I’ve worked with public companies before and they their their business, the revenue, their objects, everything they do to make decisions about growth, and their scalability is dependent on their investors. Because if they once you get an investment, you’re always seeking another round of investment, it seems, and you’re always trying to appease investors and Upwork obviously the largest Freelancer platform in the world currently, has recently taken on some investments and they’ve changed a lot about their business model. A lot of freelancers are not happy about it. And it’s all because of investors and obligate

To those investors, so you know that you choose how you want to scale. So you’re doing it smart. You’re doing it for the long term. I like that. Thank you to that, to that point. I couldn’t agree with you more. And on just not just them specifically, but business in general, when you take on capital, you make capital decisions, and I understand that’s what a business should do. But we look at our community, as our investors is a guy who puts in a million is a guy living in Silicon Valley, with a multimillion dollar house put $200,000 into a business, does he risk any more than a guy who’s living in Gurgaon, India, who works for $5 an hour to feed his family. Yeah, it’s more, and it’s how you address and you treat that risk. And we built our business lean, so that we can treat our community as our investor. I like it. I’m so excited to see what go Lance and in myself can do on the platform. So I’m going to spend a good part of the rest of the day really diving into all the aspects of it right now. I just set up my profile. So it was very easy setup. Everybody took me like five, six minutes. So it’s

The UX and UI design of the site is really nice. Going back to Freelancer advice.

We were talking about reputation. But inevitably, every Freelancer has to deal with a difficult client. How in your experience, how do you deal best with freelancers who you just can’t please? And there becomes a situation that you have to defuse? What’s the best way to approach that?

Yeah.

How do you deal with a difficult client goes back to professional answer is what you can control. Right? And and sometimes there’s a way to mitigate. I mean, Hey, can you say Look, I’m sorry, what can we do to solve this? Do you want me to put in a few extra hours you want me just give you a little bit of pain and back with what is it going to be to make you happy and sometimes people start and the concept does look, the announcer prevention is how the cure, right vetting your clients, making sure you’re equally yoked as your clients

Laying expectations but how do you deal with somebody really difficult?

Yeah, that’s that’s the million dollar question. One of the things that I do is I go, I spent so much extra time in the scope of work, what exactly is your goal? And the one question I asked my clients, all my clients would have fun is what does success look like? Three months from now six months from now, however long the project is going to take, what would it look like to make it a successful project or successful relationship and that usually sets the tone for the whole scope of work? I usually work off that answer and set the scope of work that way.

Perfect. That cures the sickness. Yep. Right. thickness is I’ve gotten thousand dollars. I’ve got something in my head that I want. I’m going to create an agreement with a guy in another part of the world because that guy’s not making that much money and that’s a lot.

And my ex, I’m not happy my expectations aren’t met but the the freelancer should say, Hey, this is what I need, understanding how to pull that vision.

From beginning, and if the client can’t do that, then you got to seriously consider whether you want to take that client, right, because they’re walking into that path of no scope. If the, if the client goes through that exercise and participates, great, he can get a great value from someone on the other side of the planet. And that person can meet those expectations. Yeah, I totally agree with very true. And another thing is clients don’t always know what they want. They know what problem they need to solve, but they don’t know what the outcome should be. Like, for example, I’m a marketing strategist. When I, when I sometimes talk to clients, they’re looking they’re expecting maybe a document like a 50 page document they have to read through. And sometimes they just want a spreadsheet of actionable tasks that their team can do you know, marketing tasks, is a marketing strategy, such a loose term and you know, when people want a logo design, they don’t know Do they need the the GPS rendered vector version? Do they need to just a JPEG? Like they don’t know any of that stuff? They just know they need a logo. So a lot of times they don’t even know what they’re looking for. Right? So you have

have to be very clear with your scope of work and tell them what what the outcome is going to be touting yourself as an expert in that you should have a method of pulling that scope out right mindset that they don’t know what they want, right? They just they know they want a solution. But they don’t know. Yet the scope of that

we do and Freelancer masterclass is we have an exercise where you should have standard questions that you’re going to be asking all the clients on the Discovery call before they even get hired or an agreement starts. So you know, you don’t leave anything unturned. I memorize all this question now because I’ve been doing it for years, but there should be 10 questions you’re going to be you need to know from every single client regardless of the project, right. So I recommend freelancers should follow that advice. Yeah, for sure. So where can our audience learn more about you, your books, your businesses, all that great stuff you have going on? Because you have so much stuff you got going on? Right? Well, our primary company is go Lance calm and they can go there visit they can always hit us up through our chat. We are growing we’re sitting

scaling customer service. So for a little slow, we apologize, we’re adding more people. That’s, that’s one area where we’re constantly improving.

And our books are on my books are on Amazon, but they’re they’re very, very important. Okay? You have to have a love for electronic payment technology. Yeah. And the industry, but I look at this business as payments, and I look at it as a race to banking. And that’s ultimately what what people want. That is when you have the driving that cost down, speeding up that payment and increasing validation, reducing fraud. That’s what that’s going to win. That’s what’s going to win the space. And I look at some of the other companies and why they made the decisions they’ve had because they can pick up a monster Silicon Valley, you know, tech giant, and make 10% of the revenue from it. Right? And they go great. Let’s get 10 more of those and we have no risk. But what does that do to the small

business, small business, the entrepreneur, what does that do to the freelancer that’s not part of part of the that elite group or agency that they’ve already put together. So do we want to continuously provide opportunity, but still at a very low cost? And we do that by validating client and validating the freelancer and bringing all of those things that you talked about checking works go? Happy, awesome. One symbiotic learn, is there certain niches of freelancers that go Lance is best for like designers or marketers are.

So developers are big, a lot of virtual assistants, a lot of a lot of call centers. In fact, we’re we’re adding one thing that’s really exciting. So we have a client that was working with us for a while that has 1000 agents. And what they have is they have their own tool they’ve integrated we’re now going to be releasing that tool to our other clients. So they they have

It’s a cost center tool, where you can go on hire a call center agent immediately. And it’ll route to like your phone a call. So they do a little online training, it’s very simple. rather call this phone, if you’re available, you press a button, like an Uber driver, you press a button, the call comes up and you read through the script. And that way, the client only pays for the top time was pretty powerful. So they’re not staffing people hourly to respond to tickets or respond to calls that that they can get those tickets or those calls. And they get to actually say, Yes, I’ll take that. And that kind of inverts the power scenario. And then with what is found is they can pay the high quality guys a little more, because they’re not paying for time that’s not being used. And then they look at the data and the results to decide how they’re running calls. It’s newer technology. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s a big trend. I think we’re gonna see a lot more. That’s very cool. Yeah, there’s a lot of lot of good

Good possibilities come out and especially with the way that you’re scaling to take advantage of some of the things that other other freelance companies won’t. So, I like that we definitely got to stay in touch with a lot more we certainly could talk about maybe we’ll do a couple more of these. Thanks so much for joining us, Michael. That’s great. My gratulations off the 10 month old. Thanks so much. Talk to you soon.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Michael Brooks is a successful digital investor and entrepreneur, Michael carries with him over 17 years of experience in FinTech, payment processing and digital marketing. Michael finds new strategic business solutions through software dev... Show Notes: Michael Brooks is a successful digital investor and entrepreneur, Michael carries with him over 17 years of experience in FinTech, payment processing and digital marketing. Michael finds new strategic business solutions through software development and electronic payments. He is the founder and of two global brands: the popular subscription billing and digital marketing … An interview with Michael Brooks, founder of goLance Read More » Mike Volkin 22:40
An interview with Philip Morgan: Learn how freelancers can position themselves for success. https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-philip-morgan-learn-how-freelancers-can-position-themselves-for-success/ Wed, 16 Oct 2019 00:11:39 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5684 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-philip-morgan-learn-how-freelancers-can-position-themselves-for-success/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-philip-morgan-learn-how-freelancers-can-position-themselves-for-success/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Philip Morgan helps implementors become advisors. He’s also the author of The Positioning Manual for Technical Firms. Questions 1. You give great insight on how freelancers and consultants can specialize and position themselves. What are some actionable tips our freelancer audience can take with them today in regards to how to position themselves? …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-philip-morgan-learn-how-freelancers-can-position-themselves-for-success/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Philip Morgan: Learn how freelancers can position themselves for success.</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Philip Morgan helps implementors become advisors. He’s also the author of The Positioning Manual for Technical Firms.
Questions

1. You give great insight on how freelancers and consultants can specialize and position themselves. What are some actionable tips our freelancer audience can take with them today in regards to how to position themselves?
2. I noticed you have a section on your website titled Ideas I am researching, which I find fascinating. Most entrepreneurs don’t have the guts to put their ideas into the public eye. Why did you decide to do this and can you outline a couple of your ideas for our listeners?
3. Why did you decided to make a risk profile self-assessment? How important is it for freelancers and consultants to assess their risk?
How can our audience follow you online?


Transcript

Today we are joined with Philip Morgan. He helps implementors become advisors. He’s also the author of the Positioning Manual for Technical Firms.

Matt: Welcome to the show, Philip. First of all, you give great insights into how freelancers and consultants can specialize and position themselves which is super important. What are some actionable tips are freelancers can take with them today in regards to how to position themselves?

Philip: I think the first is to understand why you’re doing it. You can do it to get a quick marketing win. Or you can do it to set yourself up for a lifetime of cultivating deep expertise. No matter what your goal is, you need to understand yourself. Are you a risk-taker? Are you more entrepreneurial, or are you looking for just a safe way to make your business better?

What drives you? Is it people? Is it trying to increase the profitability of your business? Or is it a love for some platform like you love being an illustrator and working with technology that you specialize in? The easy way to understanding yourself is to ask yourself, “where do I have a head start?” If you’re risk-averse, that’s probably how you’re going to specialize. If you’re more entrepreneurial, you need to be a risk-taker. Let’s say you love the idea of manufacturing. Then you tell yourself that you are going to specialize in serving manufacturing companies even if you don’t know who they are. In this case, you prove that you are a risk-taker. Those are the most funded basic things you can think about to prepare yourself to make a decision on how to specialize.

Matt: What does that exactly mean to position yourself? Are you comparing yourself to your competition?

Philip: The easiest way to think about a market position in the world of services, not products, is reputation. It is what you are known for. Most of us have some local microscopic reputation among the people who know us. Positioning is developing a reputation among people who don’t know you, who can discover you and seek you out for something that you’re known for. That gets into how you market yourself, but the basic idea is that you become the go-to person for something.

Matt: In Freelancer Masterclass, we talked about branding. Should this come before or after you determine what kind of brand you should be as a freelancer or consultant?

Philip: The deeper you get into those two topics, the more they start to look alike. It’s very similar. It’s intentional about how you want to be known.

Matt: You’re a visionary, I can tell by looking at your website and your blog. You have a section titled “Ideas I’m Researching,” I find that fascinating that you’ve publicly posted it on your website. Most entrepreneurs don’t have the guts to do that. Why did you decide to do this? And can you outline a couple of ideas that you have on your website right now for our freelancers who haven’t seen your website yet?

Philip: The main problem with the business we are in is that there’s so much received wisdom that’s curated a little bit, but the underlying assumptions aren’t questioned. I’ve been on the receiving and giving end of this; I’m guilty of being on the giving end of it. I’m not satisfied with operating that way anymore. And I’m not accusing anybody of working that way, either.

But it’s a general problem. Something sounds like a good idea; someone out there in the world tries, and it doesn’t work. Why? Probably because it wasn’t a good idea for them. I’m trying to answer one question, which is how to help people who get told what to do move into the position where they provide advice, or guidance, or strategy.

Not everybody wants to make that transition, that’s fine. I want to help those who do. And I find that there’s not a lot of reliable, evidence-based guidance about how to make. I’d want to collect using basic research tools, things like interviewing people, or just trying to measure things that haven’t been measured in a very simple way. I want to collect that information and make it available in an open way so that people can decide for themselves and see if it makes sense to them.

The motivation is that I think the industry of advice is not doing a good enough job. And I think by being open about how we arrived at our conclusions, we can do a better job.

Matt: Why did you decide to make a risk profile self-assessment? I always encourage freelancers to do that to find themselves and know who they are. A lot of times people don’t even really know they might have an idea. But I didn’t realize until I started taking self-assessments, how much I categorized as a visionary and I wouldn’t have thought. So why did you decide to make a risk profile self-assessment and how important is it for freelancers and consultants to assess their risk?

Philip: I think it’s important it gets back to two of the things we’ve touched on. One is knowing yourself, which is the foundation for deciding how you’re going to specialize. The perspective I had on specialization was you should go all the way with it; you should become hyper-specialized. You should be very entrepreneurial in your view on that. And I realized that was me applying my perspective to those I was trying to help.

The missing piece was understanding risk tolerance in the world of financial investment advice. It’s called your risk profile. It’s a combination of your ability to your emotional comfort with risk and your sort of physical ability to withstand some loss. And that was a real inspiration for me.

If you can tolerate a lot of risks, you can do things with a specialization that folks who are less risk-tolerant cannot do. It helped me understand why some people can do these really impressive things with specialization and become world-class experts. Others need to use it in a more restrained way.

What I do now is not a self-service tool; what I want to do is I take what I do now with clients and turn it into a self-service tool that anybody can use. That’s what’s going on with that risk profile, self-assessment.

Matt: I learned where my weaknesses are, and it’s surprising how you probably didn’t know until you take a test. Somebody has to tell you where your weaknesses are, and then you outsource that part of your job to where your weaknesses are because you want to keep your friends focus and all of your attention and time on where your passion lies within, right? So that’s what I use it for. How can our listeners learn more about you? I find your niche of positioning and self-assessment fascinating. I like my followers to be able to find you online.

Philip: Please go to positioningcrashcourse.com and sign-up with your email. Here, you can find the things that we’ve talked about today.

 

 

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Show Notes: Philip Morgan helps implementors become advisors. He’s also the author of The Positioning Manual for Technical Firms. Questions 1. You give great insight on how freelancers and consultants can specialize and position themselves. Show Notes: Philip Morgan helps implementors become advisors. He’s also the author of The Positioning Manual for Technical Firms. Questions 1. You give great insight on how freelancers and consultants can specialize and position themselves. What are some actionable tips our freelancer audience can take with them today in regards to how to position themselves? … An interview with Philip Morgan: Learn how freelancers can position themselves for success. Read More » Mike Volkin 9:55
What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-is-the-number-one-trait-you-must-have-to-succeed-as-a-freelancer/ Tue, 08 Oct 2019 14:37:39 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5619 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-is-the-number-one-trait-you-must-have-to-succeed-as-a-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-is-the-number-one-trait-you-must-have-to-succeed-as-a-freelancer/feed/ 0 Want to succeed as a freelancer? Then listen up! Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer Masterclass shows you what trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer. What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer? Self-discipline/initiative Communication skills Professionalism Time management Follow up Goal-oriented Skills Raw Transcript Get …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-is-the-number-one-trait-you-must-have-to-succeed-as-a-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer?</span> Read More »</a></p> Want to succeed as a freelancer? Then listen up! Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer Masterclass shows you what trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer.

What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer?

  • Self-discipline/initiative
  • Communication skills
  • Professionalism
  • Time management
  • Follow up
  • Goal-oriented
  • Skills

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

It’s a great time for some freelancers school and today’s topic, by the way on my golden lead instructor Freelancer masterclass. Today’s topic, we’re going to be discussing what is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer. And the reason why this is important because if you pick up on some of these on what you’re good at, and what you’re not good at, you have to be honest with yourself. You have some homework assignment to improve upon these and I guarantee you any one of these traits that I mentioned, have some kind of books or courses associated with it, to improve your skills. And believe me, complacency and freelancing don’t go well together. So if you think you’re okay and your career and not pushing yourself to move forward, then you will fall behind. So let’s go ahead and talk about some of these key traits that make freelancers so successful. The first thing and probably the most important is self discipline and initiative. I know many very skilled people. That would be fantastic freelancers, but they are not because they are just used to working for somebody and having work fed to them and being told when the deadline is and being told this and being told that but if you are a freelancer, you must be self disciplined, you must know what work is due when you must know what your responsibilities are, you must be proactive in doing certain thing and, and have initiative because without that, you’re never going to push yourself and never going to be disciplined enough to do client work or even bring in clients. Okay, another one is communication skills. I’ve talked to a lot of people and I’m not making fun of you web dev people out there, but it tends to be more web dev than anything else. I know a lot of people that just aren’t good communicators, they have to beg them for an update. If I’m hiring them, I have to really talk them through the scope of work and the proposal process and just squeeze words out of them because they just don’t communicate well. They don’t explain themselves well, or even more commonly, especially in the web dev area, they’ll talk code and speak to you, they don’t know how to talk to layman’s terms. I don’t need to know the details of the API. I don’t need to know the, the sauce and how it’s made. I just want to be able to taste it, you know. So knowing how to communicate effectively and what I call managing up is very important. as a freelancer, professionalism, I had recently fire a freelancer I was working with because he just wasn’t professional, you know, calling me and some of my co workers bro.

It just, you know, that’s just one small example. But just understand that you’re running here. You’re free. Lansing career as a business, you wouldn’t be professional going to work for someone else. So, why if you’re making money for your own career, would you be unprofessional there’s a line between being friends and being friendly. Okay? And then there’s a line between being unprofessional so you want to keep it professional, especially if this particular Freelancer is going to be working with you on clients. Okay, time management Absolutely. essential skill for freelancers, especially for busy freelancers, you can’t possibly be a successful freelance without having some kind of rhythm or process around time management. So if you’re like me, where you live and die by your calendar Time management is a huge priority for being successful. Unless you’re the type of person that wants to work weekends and 24 seven and be a slave to client emails and phone calls and time management probably isn’t that important to you? But for someone like me, who has made a career out of being a freelancer, time management skills, is of paramount importance. Another skill that is super important to have as a freelancer is the follow up. Okay, so why is following up with clients that important? Well, one, it just goes back to communication skills like I talked about earlier, but following up with clients, and even prospects will be the easiest way for you to make money. Okay? So many clients or I’m sorry, so many freelancers that I work with, send a proposal and never follow up. Okay, you have to have a process around that. So many freelancers I work with never follow up with their clients, this is my work for the day or for the week, they wait to be contacted. So if you have a system in place, then great but if you don’t have one, then I mean, I need you to literally write it down. This is what I’m going to do to follow up with clients to keep them happy. answer that question. This is what I’m going to do to make sure my proposals are read and responded to you have to write that down. That’s a process you have to have So for example, I need to get a, a response on 100% of my proposals. What is your plan? Well, my plan is I will send the proposal I will follow up with the phone call, I’ll put in my calendar. Once I send the proposal that in 24 hours, I need to follow up. And then I’ll send another calendar appointment, calendar reminder to myself and invite that says, if you haven’t heard from this person in three days and a week, follow up this person, then maybe send them a phone call. So I have four or five reminders. You’re not bothering them because you took the time to put together proposal. Okay, so you have to have a follow up system in place. And if you have to write it down at first, I don’t write it down anymore because I haven’t memorized it been doing this for a very long time. Okay. But you have to be goal oriented. That’s another tip if you don’t have goals and have nothing to strive for. For example, here’s an analogy I like to use if you get in a car and you have no place to drive. How do you know when you get there? Okay. Just getting in a car and knowing where you’re going to go is a goal, I have to get to this lunch place, I have to go meet someone for bowling, I don’t know, whatever you hit your goal, that is a goal. Okay, so if you don’t have a goal in your business, if you’re not goal oriented, then you don’t know if you’ve reached that point of success or failure to get you to that next level. So when I was starting out as a freelancer, my goal was to get to a certain amount per hour, I think it was 85. This is many years ago. $85 per hour, I think was my goal. After the first year, I reached it, I said, Okay, here’s my next goal. But if I never made it to that first goal, I never made a goal. I would have never been where I’m at right now, who knows, I might even be charging 50 or $85 per hour. So if you’re constantly pushing yourself, then that’s how you get to be successful. And the way to do that is by making goals, not big goals, small scalable goals. Don’t try to scale too fast, or you’re going to get lost in other problems like processes and scalability. issues. So make small, achievable goals and be sure to celebrate them along the way. Okay, the last tip I have for you in terms of traits that you must have to succeed as a freelancer is skills, obviously, you have to understand what skill you provide what value you provide to clients. And if you don’t know that, then get one. Okay? And there’s ways that you can just type in different niches. And if you’re not happy with your skill set right now, there’s plenty of ways to learn skill sets, okay? You can go to automate UDM, wire calm, learn a few classes. You can if you want to learn about Google Analytics, for example, you can go right to Google, they have their own university on how to use analytics or even AdWords, you know, there’s tons and tons of resources in this connected world to learn any amount of skill set for free or virtually free. So take advantage of your connected society that you live in today. Okay, so I hope you learned something today. Until our next class, make it a great one.

Thank you for joining Joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Want to succeed as a freelancer? Then listen up! Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer Masterclass shows you what trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer. What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer? Want to succeed as a freelancer? Then listen up! Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer Masterclass shows you what trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer. What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer? Self-discipline/initiative Communication skills Professionalism Time management Follow up Goal-oriented Skills Raw Transcript Get … What is the number one trait you must have to succeed as a freelancer? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 8:18
An interview with successful freelance web developer RJ McCollam https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-successful-freelance-web-developer-rj-mccollam/ Thu, 03 Oct 2019 21:21:56 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5460 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-successful-freelance-web-developer-rj-mccollam/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-successful-freelance-web-developer-rj-mccollam/feed/ 0 Show Notes: RJ McCollam is a freelance web developer working from Broken Arrow, OK. Having freelanced since 2008 he has also focused on helping other freelancers through his podcast, blog, course, and project management app Hector. He shares his actual experience in an attempt to encourage those wanting to either start freelancing or move into …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-successful-freelance-web-developer-rj-mccollam/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with successful freelance web developer RJ McCollam</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

RJ McCollam is a freelance web developer working from Broken Arrow, OK. Having freelanced since 2008 he has also focused on helping other freelancers through his podcast, blog, course, and project management app Hector. He shares his actual experience in an attempt to encourage those wanting to either start freelancing or move into full-time freelancing focusing on useful advice and attainable goals for someone just getting started.

Questions

1.Tell me about Hector and why you developed it.

2.As a WordPress developer, how do you separate yourself from the sea of competition, especially overseas contractors willing to work for pennies on the dollar

3.At what point did you decide to become a full-time freelancer?

4.What has been your biggest success as a freelancer and what contributed to that success?

5.You have a blog titled Complacency killed the freelance star. Can you explain the dangers of staying comfortable as a freelancer?

6.How can our audience follow you online?

Be sure to register as a student at Freelancer Masterclass! 


Transcript

In today’s episode, we’re joined by RJ McCollam. He’s a freelance web developer working from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, having freelance since 2008. He has also focused on helping other freelancers through his podcast, his blogs, his courses, and his project management app- Hector. We will talk about how to start freelancing or move into full time freelancing. He wants to focus on useful advice and attainable goals for someone who’s just getting started.

Matt: Tell me about Hector and why you developed it.

RJ: Freelancers don’t typically work on teams. They are working with either a large group of people and for the longest time, everybody that I worked with always tried to find like this perfect way to manage all of our products that I couldn’t find it. If I was working with three different people, I needed client A to not be able to see client B, etc. I figured out that there wasn’t a way to see all of the things that were on my plate in one place, regardless of who I was working with. And that’s what sparked Hector.

Matt: That’s it sounds like a handy tool. You’re a WordPress developer at heart, right?

RJ: Yes, that’s what I love to do.

Matt: We get a lot of questions on how I separate myself from all the competitors. As a WordPress developer, you have no shortage of competitors, right? It’s the sea of competition out there, especially overseas contractors who well, let’s be frank, work for pennies on the dollar. How do you compete with that?

RJ: It’s easy. You do what you say you’re going to do. WordPress is a huge platform, which means there’s lots of competition. A lot of people don’t follow through, or they take the shortcut to get as little done as possible to get the invoice paid. Just being able to come through, listen to people what they want and deliver that. It’s simple. I wish I had some silver bullet answer, but it’s a silver bullet answer.

Matt: I tell my students all the time, don’t worry about your competitors. Just focus on your brand and what you can deliver, and it’ll all fall into place. It might seem like an easy solution. But really, that’s what you have to do. The people that want to hire people from overseas at $4 an hour, those aren’t your ideal clients anyway, right. So at what point did you decide to become a full-time Freelancer?

RJ: It’s kind of always been the end goal. I’ve been freelancing for just over ten years now. That’s always what I was moving towards. I’m having only made $15,000, the previous year to freelancing, with the support of my wife, I quit my job, we had three months of our bills paid, and it was like, it’s time to put up or shut up, this is either going to work and I’m going to do it, or I’m not. And six years later, I’m more successful than I’ve ever been.

Matt: Speaking of that success, what has been maybe the one or top couple contributing factors that have stuck out in your mind?

RJ: For me, it’s relationships. I wouldn’t be where I’m at without relationships. How do you set yourself apart from the competition? The key is relationships that I’ve invested in. I work with people all over the country; I rarely leave my house that often. And it’s because of these relationships that I’ve had opportunities that I’ve been able to step into and deliver. My goal is to build relationships that can last forever.

Matt: I think another answer to your question might be complacency. I noticed you have a blog called “Complacency Killed the freelance Star.” Can you explain the dangers of a successful Freelancer or even a growing freelancer on being complacent?

RJ: It’s tough. As a freelancer, you have your specialty, which you do. And regardless of what it is, everything changes- technology, skill sets, social media. If you get comfortable and you become complacent, you’re going to get left behind. It’s just a matter of time. So that’s my number one fear, if things are going well, I don’t want to rock the boat too much. I don’t like to feel like we’re just sitting still.

Matt: That’s great advice. But how can a freelancer avoid being complacent? What can someone physically due to practice not being complacent?

RJ: Practice. Push yourself out of your comfort zone. I’m a developer. That’s the easiest example to give and I build custom WordPress themes. And you know, WordPress is changing all the time itself. I need to be able to step into new technologies. That the way, when they do something, and I need to experience it. Maybe I don’t go full force into it. But you have to step out of the comfort zone and try something that you haven’t. Maybe that’s marketing, maybe that’s a different place to get clients or anything along those lines. But you just got to step out.

Matt: I do that in my personal life every year. I started doing things that I’m not comfortable doing. A couple of years ago, I made a goal to go skydiving, which I did. This year, I made a goal to do a stand-up comedy act, which I did. So uncomfortable. I think in terms of complacency, a lot of it is education- just understanding what’s out there and keeping up with the times. Tell me a little bit about your podcast and how often that’s updated in your blog and, of course, your courses. We want to hear all about that stuff.

RJ: The podcast has been dormant for about a year. However, I’ve transitioned from being a freelancer to an agency co-owner. But we’re revamping the podcast. As of October 1, we’re going to be doing two new episodes.

The blog sits dormant. I know that blogging is something that helps me communicate with freelancers. I remember being that guy driving to work every day. And just feeling like I was listening to these podcasts and getting useful information, but it just felt so beyond me. It’s really important for me through the podcasts, through writing, through Hector and through a course that I put out to make a full-time income as a WordPress developer. All that stuff is resurfacing; I guess you could say.

Matt: I love to see you get back into it. And you have a course for freelancers, is that updated?

RJ: It’s not updated. In a perfect world, I’d love to sit down and revamp it. But you can go to rjmccollam.com. The courses are there; you can download everything. You can find information on how I approach business in terms of pricing, finding new clients diving more into relationships, and then how I develop a theme.

Matt: Is it specifically geared towards tech-freelancers or WordPress freelancers, more specifically?

RJ: That I think is relevant to any Freelancer, but it’s okay if you have some knowledge of HTML and CSS. And like I said, I show you how I do it, but a lot of it is why I do it the way I do it.

Matt: You have some new podcast you said and coming in October, right? What’s the name of that podcast?

RJ: It’s the freelance podcast, very easy to remember. It’s mostly going to be conversations between me and my partner. I’m bringing on an official co-host, who’s my business partner and we’re going to be discussing a bunch of different topics answering listener questions, the occasional interview, but it’s more or less going to be our spin on particular issues.

 

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Show Notes: RJ McCollam is a freelance web developer working from Broken Arrow, OK. Having freelanced since 2008 he has also focused on helping other freelancers through his podcast, blog, course, and project management app Hector. Show Notes: RJ McCollam is a freelance web developer working from Broken Arrow, OK. Having freelanced since 2008 he has also focused on helping other freelancers through his podcast, blog, course, and project management app Hector. He shares his actual experience in an attempt to encourage those wanting to either start freelancing or move into … An interview with successful freelance web developer RJ McCollam Read More » Mike Volkin clean 11:11
An Interview with Nathan Hirsch, CEO of FreeUp.com https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-nathan-hirsch-ceo-of-freeup-com/ Thu, 03 Oct 2019 21:14:15 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5457 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-nathan-hirsch-ceo-of-freeup-com/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-nathan-hirsch-ceo-of-freeup-com/feed/ 0 Nathan Hirsch is an entrepreneur and expert in remote hiring and eCommerce. He is the co-founder and CEO of FreeeUp.com, a  marketplace that connects businesses with pre-vetted freelancers in eCommerce, digital marketing, and much more. He has sold over $30 million online and regularly appears on leading business podcasts around the world. Transcript Nathan Hirsch …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-nathan-hirsch-ceo-of-freeup-com/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview with Nathan Hirsch, CEO of FreeUp.com</span> Read More »</a></p> Nathan Hirsch is an entrepreneur and expert in remote hiring and eCommerce. He is the co-founder and CEO of FreeeUp.com, a  marketplace that connects businesses with pre-vetted freelancers in eCommerce, digital marketing, and much more. He has sold over $30 million online and regularly appears on leading business podcasts around the world.


Transcript

Nathan Hirsch is an entrepreneur and an expert in remote hiring and e-commerce. He is a co-founder and CEO of FreeeUp.com, a marketplace that connects businesses with pre-vetted freelancers. He regularly appears on leading business podcasts from all over the world.  Now, he can also add a freelancer school to his repertoire.

Matt: I read an article about you on Thrive Global, where you mentioned you are an introvert, and I wanted to ask you because a lot of freelancers are introverts, do you think there’s an advantage to being an introvert and an entrepreneur?

Nathan:  If you see me on podcasts or talking on stage, it seems like I’m the most outgoing person. But bottom line, I don’t get energy from talking to other people. By the time I’m done at a conference, I’m done with the podcast; I’m tired. I need some time to refresh and rejuvenate. I think it helps freelancers, as long as they can do make the sales call and interviews, but not in a socially awkward way that would turn off clients.

There’s some benefit in blocking everything else out and focus on what you want to do. I feel like being an introvert allows you to do that work. I know many extroverts who are talented sales people, and they’re super outgoing. They want to be around other people at all times, and they’re not able to take a step back and do things on their own, which is part of being an entrepreneur.

Matt: At what point did you decide you wanted to work for yourself?

Nathan: My parents are both teachers. Growing up, I got into the mentality that I was going to go to school, get a real job work for 30 years, retire and that’s what they do. I mean, they’re retired now they’re traveling the world. They’re living life. There’s nothing wrong with that, but it’s always not what I wanted.

On my internships, I was working 40-50 hours a week, where I learned marketing, customer service and business. I also learned I just hated working for other people. I knew I was going to be miserable in any job that required me to report to someone else.

I did everything possible to avoid having to get a real job when I graduated. I started at textbook business and I created a little referral program. I was competing with my school bookstore. And I eventually got a cease and desist letter from my college. So that was my first glimpse into being an entrepreneur and I was addicted from there.

I had sold some books on Amazon, and I thought it was so cool. I started experimenting with outdoor products, home goods, video games, computers, and other products. I failed several times and the only thing I get to sell was books.

I kept looking until finally, I came across the baby product industry. I started dropshipping baby products on Amazon. I got in at a great time; my business started scaling. At age 20, I’m selling millions of dollars of baby products on Amazon.

I had a tough decision to make. I have this degree behind me that I worked hard to finish. And then I have this business that was growing and doing well. I had no idea what I was going to do with my life.

I called with my aunt, who’s an entrepreneur, and she told me all the benefits and that I should follow it. I went the entrepreneurial route and never looked back.

Matt: What were your challenges when you’re first starting out being an entrepreneur? What tips can you give our audience that maybe they can avoid doing?

Nathan: Most of my challenges were around hiring, which is why I built the FreeUp marketplace, to begin with. I was 21 at that time; I knew nothing about recruitment. I knew nothing about management or leadership.  I quickly gave up hiring people in person.

I went to the remote hiring world like Upwork the Fiverr, and it was okay. I found some people that were still with me today. But I always wanted something better, something faster. So I built my own platform FreeeUp to address those concerns. But the biggest lesson was you can’t just hire people for skill. Many times, I hired people that had excellent references, impressive resume, five-star reviews, years of experience, and all those stuff.

I realized that skill is just one part of the equation. Now, we don’t care if they’re a 10 out of 10, or 5 out of 10. What we care about is if the applicant is honest about what they can and cannot do and if he’s pricing himself accordingly.

Attitude and communication are a big part as well. You want people that are passionate about what they do. You want people who don’t get aggressive when something doesn’t go their way and those who can take feedback without taking it personally.

Communication is everything. If I hire you and you have a great attitude and a great skill set, and you and I can communicate, nothing else really matters. Spending time finding people who can communicate at a high level is very important.

Matt: Tell me a little bit about FreeUp, its capabilities, and how it differs from other platforms.

Nathan: FreeUp gets thousands of applicants every week for different positions. We only get the top 1% to fill-up various job openings. For clients, they create an account in seconds; they put in a request to hire someone, they don’t have to browse, they don’t have to go through 50 people, we fill that request within a business day with one person. If they want more, we will give them more. Then they can quickly interview them and get started. It saves them so much time.

We have 24/7 support for both the client and freelancer in case they have an issue. We have a no turnover guarantee; people on our platform rarely quit. But if they do, we cover replacement costs and get them a new person right away.

Matt: So why do you cap it off at $100 an hour?

Nathan: There’s not a cap; the freelancers set their rates. When we started FreeUp, we originally started with VA with $5 to $25 ballpark range, and then we went from $5 and $50, and so on.  We’re inching up that ballpark, but we got freelance that charge more than $100 bucks an hour, you can charge fixed prices. We don’t limit that or set their rates in any way.

Matt: You certainly know a lot of different freelancers. Can you give our freelance audience some tips on how they can scale faster than other freelancers?

Nathan: As a freelancer, you have to look at yourself as a business. If you’re a business, let’s say you’re a graphic designer, you’re not just doing graphic design, you have to do the sales and marketing. You got to look at yourself as all parts of the business and be working on all parts of the business every day. Focus on the system, focus on those processes, and focus on the big picture. I see so many freelancers that they get into an argument with a client for $25. Instead of just making it right and moving on and continuing to work with that client and making more money or getting referrals from that client, they blow up the relationship for no reason.

You have to be customer-centric focused; you have to understand that not every client is going to be rainbows and butterflies. It’s not how real life works. But you have to be the bigger person, the bigger man, the bigger woman, the person who resolves things quickly and doesn’t let things dry out and escalated. To me, if you’re doing those things, you’re going to have way more success. The freelancer who’s only focused on graphic design, who can’t solve issues, who can only work with really good clients, this person can only go so far.

Matt: Is it realistic for a freelancer to work for eight hours a day and spend extra time for prospecting?

Nathan: Definitely. And I would even go a step further as you grow.

Matt: Do you remember what your first hire was? What position?

Nathan: At 20, I know nothing about hiring. I post a job on Facebook. My classmate in business law shoots me a message saying that he needs a job. I don’t even interview him, but he ends up being a fantastic hire. He’s hard-working. He’s smart. He makes my job easier. Today, he’s my business partner in FreeeUp. We’ve been working together for more than a decade.

Matt: Do you think there’s any correlation between that luck you got in your first hire and the reason why you started FreeeUp and the whole concept behind not hiring for particular skills? Is there any correlation there? Maybe subconsciously?

Nathan: I have some amazing hires, and my team builds me 1200 hours a week. I mean, I couldn’t work 400 hours a week even if I wanted to. One thing that I realized after making that hire is how good it makes you look when you surround yourself with a player like you.  For me, that was the main point of FreeeUp, to surround people with players at all times so that they can pursue their business, their dreams, their passion, whatever that is.

Matt: For all these freelancers listening, can you introduce more what FreeUp.com can do for them?

Nathan: FreeUp.com has many vacancies for different jobs, be it as a VA, digital marketing, real estate agents, and other marketing positions. We have a wide range of clients, including software companies, real estate, e-commerce, and everything else. If you’re a skilled graphic designer, writer, Amazon expert, whatever it is, we have clients for you on our platform. The best part is, you can set your rates and decide whether you want a fixed or hourly price.

Matt: Where else can our listeners find you besides that FreeeUp calm?

Nathan: You can follow me on social media channels, realnatehirsch on Instagram and Twitter. I’m on LinkedIn, I’m on Facebook, I’m probably one of the easiest people to contact, but if you’re looking to offer services, I stay away from that team. I let them do their job. They are awesome. We call them our freelancing success team and you can apply right on the website or email us freelancers@FreeUp.com.

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Nathan Hirsch is an entrepreneur and expert in remote hiring and eCommerce. He is the co-founder and CEO of FreeeUp.com, a  marketplace that connects businesses with pre-vetted freelancers in eCommerce, digital marketing, and much more. Nathan Hirsch is an entrepreneur and expert in remote hiring and eCommerce. He is the co-founder and CEO of FreeeUp.com, a  marketplace that connects businesses with pre-vetted freelancers in eCommerce, digital marketing, and much more. He has sold over $30 million online and regularly appears on leading business podcasts around the world. Transcript Nathan Hirsch … An Interview with Nathan Hirsch, CEO of FreeUp.com Read More » Mike Volkin clean 15:28
An interview with Matt Inglot of Freelance Transformation https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-matt-inglot-of-freelance-transformation/ Wed, 02 Oct 2019 17:31:34 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=5351 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-matt-inglot-of-freelance-transformation/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-matt-inglot-of-freelance-transformation/feed/ 0 Show Notes Matt Inglot is the creator FreelanceTransformation.com where he helps freelance designers, developers, and marketers to win clients and build a dream lifestyle through freelancing. Matt’s expertise comes from running a web agency for 11 years which he transformed from a traditional brick and mortar office and an 80 hour work week to significantly …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-matt-inglot-of-freelance-transformation/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Matt Inglot of Freelance Transformation</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Matt Inglot is the creator FreelanceTransformation.com where he helps freelance designers, developers, and marketers to win clients and build a dream lifestyle through freelancing.

Matt’s expertise comes from running a web agency for 11 years which he transformed from a traditional brick and mortar office and an 80 hour work week to significantly less work and far greater profitability. From that experience, Matt has realized that most freelancers and consultants make life far more difficult for themselves than it needs to be.

Questions

1. How did you get started as a freelancer?

2. So you chose the agency route, which some freelancers decide to do. What caused that decision to go from freelancer to agency owner?

3. What changed for you in terms of your daily activities and goals when you made the switch?

4. So your agency Titled Pixel aims to turn website visitors into customers, can you give freelancermasterclass.com a couple of suggestions on improvements that can be made to the site?

5. Was there a big breakthrough for your business that stands out as a point in time that helped you establish your credibility?

6. How can our audience learn more about you?


Transcript

An Interview with Matt Inglot

I’m very excited to announce our guest, Matt Inglot. He’s the creator of freelancetransformation.com, where he helps freelance designers, developers and marketers win clients and build that dream lifestyle through freelancing. Matt’s expertise comes from running a web agency for 11 years, which he transformed from a traditional brick and mortars office, and 80-hour workweek to significantly less work and far higher profitability.

Mike: You are a successful freelancer and agency owner. How did you start as a freelancer?

Matt: It was partly out of necessity. I started while I was still in school. I had to pay for my tuition and rent because my parents didn’t have much. I got a small job at a start-up company while attending school.

Mike: You chose not to get a student loan and pay your tuition with your earnings from your job?

Matt: Yes, but unfortunately, the company closed. I needed to figure out what other ways I could earn money. I knew web development so I asked myself, could I flip burgers and make $10 per hour, or I could create a website and get more?

I chose to build a site and market it to people. Telling people to look at my website was very hard because I’m a shy person. But I needed the money, so I pushed myself to go out there and introduce myself. One day, I got a client and the rest is history for me.

Mike: I own a marketing agency as well. But we have different niches; I’m a fractional CMO, and you are focused on conversion optimization. Is that right?

Matt: Yes, more specifically, working with digital businesses, specifically, people have online products, membership sites, things like that. We started off fairly broad. We would help anyone turn visitors into customers. That’s still our tagline on our website. But behind the scenes, we have particular clients that we look for.

Mike: A lot of freelancers are asking me how to scale up from a freelancer to an agency owner. I say both the good and the bad about starting an agency, but in your case, how did you switch from a freelancer to creating your agency?

Matt: I grew up in Waterloo, Ontario, where many startup companies are thriving. Everyone there is asking me to grow my business. When I had the money to invest in a business, I thought that having an agency was the next logical step to do, which I did. I opened an office, hired employees, while still going to school. It worked for quite some time, but it got me to a point where I hated what I was doing. Because of that, my business started collapsing so I was forced to consider other options. That’s when I started an agency because I needed to do something to source money.

I carefully evaluated what went wrong with my business, then I started to regroup myself and focused on the good side of it. I realized that I did like having a small team. I didn’t want to create an empire and manage tens, hundreds, or thousands, of employees. That would really freak me out. But I knew that I need a team because I couldn’t handle all the tasks alone. I started to hire professionals who could help me do specific tasks while I focused more on the business aspect of running an agency.

Currently, I have a team with five members. We are working as one to fulfill our projects for different clients. I have a plan to increase their numbers, says ten within the next ten years. That will be the peak of my business because I’m only into a micro agency.

Mike: When you were a freelancer, you first focused on web development, and then you started your agency. What changed in your daily activities?

Matt: The big thing that’s changed is that I didn’t have to deal with the client’s work anymore. I still do some even to this day. But it allowed me to get rid of stuff that was really getting in my way. The very first tasks that I delegated was bookkeeping. It had nothing to do with client work, but it was just entering stuff into the books which, if you’re a freelancer, there’s a perfect chance that you’re doing this thing yourself. And you’re probably dreading it every week or every month.

From then on, I started delegating other tasks like programming, design, and other office works because I didn’t want to get occupied by those responsibilities. That gave me time to work with clients, which was excellent. But I made another mistake. I tried to overgrow which meant I hired more people which I needed to pay. In the end, I was getting less money. The solution? I looked for the right client who gave us more revenue. Now that I do it that way, it works so much better.

Mike: Very true. The first thing I did was I hired someone to take care of the books because I didn’t want to learn QuickBooks. And you know what changed for me when I started an agency was, I found myself selling a lot more than actually doing what I love to do and that’s marketing. I found that as an agency owner, I’m always worried about bringing clients in the door and keeping them longer rather than servicing the client in the industry that I want.

Your agency titled tiltedpixel.com, right? It aims to turn website visitors into customers. I’m going to put you on the spot. You’ve seen Freelancer Masterclass, my website. Can you give me a couple of suggestions on how I can improve?

Matt: Well, let’s structure this a little bit. I have one very important question for you. What is the goal of Freelancer Masterclass? What do you want to happen when people visit that site?

Mike: I want people to apply to be a student. That means they start an eight-week course. They join a small group of other students, and we go through step by step every week, different activities and lessons and along the way, there’s a 10-step module over an eight-week period that they go through the course together.

Matt: And how what is your biggest struggle with this website right now?

Mike: Getting freelancers that we can’t service, meaning since we all go through group lessons together, the time zone is difficult. We get a lot of applications a week from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan; these freelancers can’t join the class because it’s the middle of the night when we’re meeting at 6 pm here.

Matt: Just by looking at your website in passing, there are a few things that stick out to me. The designs are on point, absolutely no complaints there. It’s very obvious to me that you spent quite a bit of time in building your website. You’ve got a podcast, you’ve got testimonials, and most importantly, you have a big call to action right at the top of your homepage that’s asking people to do the thing that you want them to do.

And where things kind of slip up for me is your tagline right at the top is learn how to be a Master Freelancer for free. The free thing is pretty cool. I suspect that grabs people. I’m not sure I really like the idea of learning how to be a Master Freelancer because it doesn’t translate to the actual benefit of being a Master Freelancer. It doesn’t give them an idea of what they’re going to achieve by being a Master Freelancer.

Ask yourself what’s their motivation for being a freelancer and turn that into the headline, and there’s a very good chance that that will be a lot more effective for you.

There’s something also cautionary with the “for free” phrase. That makes me wonder if maybe, the “for free” thing is positioning the wrong impression for people. To give you an idea, you have two types of customers: the people that want a result and will handsomely pay for it, and the people that like value but also want to get it at a cheap price, or even for free. The word “free” is attracting the crowd that maybe doesn’t have a lot of money to spend and is looking for freebies. And those people are not always the easiest people to then convert into paying customers.

Mike: Very true. Those are all great points. And if you noticed, Matt used a technique when he talked about Freelancer Masterclass, which we call the sandwich technique, and that’s when you’re talking to clients when they’re asking you to critique something. He gave me something good, you gave me something I could improve on and then he on and then he gave me something good again. You’re putting the bad, and in the middle, so the conversation flows nicely and it doesn’t seem like your insulting me. You did an excellent job with that.

Was there a big breakthrough for your business that stands out as a point in time that helps you establish your credibility?

Matt: I think it all goes back to the worst point in my business where everything was falling around my ears. It forced me to look at my business and see what was going well and what wasn’t. When I started digging into it, I realized I had a really cool business here if I focused on just a few clients that were making all the money for us. I call them our high-paying clients. These are the type of clients that were coming back to us year after year after year and spending more money with us. So, if I invested the time to find that client, and to serve them well and make them rave about us, then that was potentially a six-figure deal.

Mike: That’s great. And I’m telling freelancers to pick up a niche. One time, a freelancer who is an SEO specialist told me that he was willing to do SEO for any industry. I told him he needs to pick one because if he’s targeting everyone, he’s targeting no one. That way, if he knows exactly who he wants to target, he can have much more opportunity.

You have to understand and realize that. So you did that early on in your career, and now you’re reaping the fruits of your labor.

Matt: I like that. I’ll point out that when you’re in that position where you don’t know who to target, to some extent, you’re going to have to go through that exploratory phase. But when you’re a generalist and I asked you, how are you going to find clients? You will probably say, “I don’t know.”

That’s the problem when you are targeting everybody; you don’t know where to find everybody. Whereas if you do SEO for dentists, you can sit for an hour and find dental clients and you will never worry where to find them next time.

Mike: Exactly. Well, how can our audience learn more about you and follow you?

Matt: I encourage everyone to visit Freelance Transformation, and there you can get all my advice, all my experiences.  On top of that, I’ve interviewed close to 180 other freelancers and agency owners whose advice can help you become a successful freelancer too. If you have a podcast player, you can just enter Freelance Transformation, and you’ll see the podcast come up or go to freelancetransformation.com. We update our content monthly.

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Show Notes Matt Inglot is the creator FreelanceTransformation.com where he helps freelance designers, developers, and marketers to win clients and build a dream lifestyle through freelancing. Matt’s expertise comes from running a web agency for 11 year... Show Notes Matt Inglot is the creator FreelanceTransformation.com where he helps freelance designers, developers, and marketers to win clients and build a dream lifestyle through freelancing. Matt’s expertise comes from running a web agency for 11 years which he transformed from a traditional brick and mortar office and an 80 hour work week to significantly … An interview with Matt Inglot of Freelance Transformation Read More » Mike Volkin 21:19
An interview with Trevor Twining: Freelancer Coach https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-trevor-twining-freelancer-coach/ Tue, 24 Sep 2019 15:47:38 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=4099 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-trevor-twining-freelancer-coach/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-trevor-twining-freelancer-coach/feed/ 0 Show Notes Trevor Twining (rhymes w/ FINE-ing) has freelanced for almost two decades. He coaches freelancers to build profitable practices, particularly improving sales skills. Trevor hosts Freelance Foundations, a podcast that helps freelancers with both tactical and strategic issues. His own freelance practice focuses on podcast editing. He lives in Canada’s Niagara Region. Questions 1. …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-trevor-twining-freelancer-coach/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Trevor Twining: Freelancer Coach</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Trevor Twining (rhymes w/ FINE-ing) has freelanced for almost two decades. He coaches freelancers to build profitable practices, particularly improving sales skills. Trevor hosts Freelance Foundations, a podcast that helps freelancers with both tactical and strategic issues. His own freelance practice focuses on podcast editing. He lives in Canada’s Niagara Region.
Questions
1. In your blog titled “3 Essential Freelancer Tactics for Getting Paid’ you talk about the importance of getting at least a 50% deposit before starting work. Can you explain how you ask for that 50% and why 50%?
2. What are some warning signs that a freelancer isn’t charging enough?
3. What are you doing now to fill your time?
4. Tell me about the mission for the freelance foundation podcast
5. How can our audience follow you online?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Thank you for joining me again on freelancers School. My name is Mike Volkin. And today we have Trevor twining joining us. He’s freelance for almost two decades, and he coaches freelancers to build profitable practices, particularly improving their sales skills. Now, Trevor hosts freelance foundations, which where I found him from, which is a podcast that helps freelancers with both tactical and strategic issues, and his own freelance practice focuses on podcast editing, and hopefully he’s going to give me some tips later on about improving my microphone technique. Because I know I have issues there and his is really awesome if you could see it. If you’re watching this on YouTube, he was Canada’s Niagara, sorry, how does it net Niagara region? Niagara region. So in Canada that northern Canada?

No, it is. We’re 40 minutes from Buffalo, New York.

Okay. Well, welcome to the show.

Thanks for having me, Mike. This is it’s great to be on.

Now. Thank you. I had found you on your podcast, obviously, it’s pretty popular. And then I started looking more into you and I found your blog. Love your blog. I’m a subscriber and I have to ask you in your blog that’s titled, The three essential Freelancer tactics for getting paid. You talk about the importance of getting at least 50% deposit before starting work, which is something I highly encourage our students to do at Freelancer masterclass. So, can you explain how you asked for the 50%? Because a lot of people feel uncomfortable about that. And then why 50% Why not? 25 Why not? 75 So where’s that 50% come from?

Oh, goodness.

How much time do you have?

Under 10 minutes,

okay, so So the reason 50% is so important is because, like long story short again, I have a you know, I have a coaching practice where where I help freelancers as well, but and I know that in in your class, this is one of the things that that you cover for sure, but long story short is that that 50% number really sort of locks in the client makes them committed to working with you 50% of you know, a of an overall project cost is too big to just walk away from or ghost on the side and it makes them essentially dedicate and focus the resources that you’re going to need as a freelancer internally on their side to make sure that you have all the things that you need to succeed. And while it doesn’t guarantee it, it certainly helps make it more likely because they’ve actually got a bunch of money on the line.

Okay, and Is that is that go for all size projects, whether it’s a $200 project or a $10,000? project still 50%.

So I would say that the, that the larger ones, it’s definitely a minimum of 50%. The smaller ones, like somebody could walk away from a, you know, 50% of a $200 deal, right? So it’s, in some cases, you might even say, you know, what, if you really want me to, to lock in the time to do this, you can, you can pay in advance and I’ve done that before. And it’s been, it’s been no problem. Actually, most of my podcasting clients currently pay in advance for a block of of work, and then I deliver that work incrementally as we go. So there, you just got that block.

Yeah, that’s smart. Okay, so what happens if a client comes to you and says, You know what, I pay my employees after they do work, you know, at the end of the month, why do I have to pay you in advance? Is there a Is there a good answer for that?

Oh, it’s part of it is you also pay your Employees whether or not they’re doing anything productive. You also, you know, you also pay all the overhead associated with your employee benefits. Exactly. And as a freelancer, I take care of all that stuff myself, you don’t pay you as the as the client. Don’t pay for a lick of that. Well, actually, you pay for your very specific portion of that as it relates to to the billable time that that our relationship covers. Good

answer. I like that. So what are some of the warning signs that a freelancer isn’t charging enough for their service?

Oh, my gosh. So I, I’m gonna I’m going to answer this question, but then also lead into what the most common underlying problem of the symptom is. So the symptom is, you know, you’re not necessarily earning enough in your practice. You feel like you’re, you know, you feel like you’re robbing Peter to pay Paul and all that sort of thing and People like well, am I charging enough and one of the ways to tell whether or not you’re charging enough is if you are, you need to figure out a couple of things you need to figure out first, you’re basically what you want to earn as a freelancer after all your expenses are taken care of. You need to figure out what that what the number that represents those expenses are, and then you need to figure out the the level of activity that you need to that you need to generate in order to support that income. And so, if you are performing the work to generate that level of activity, and you still don’t have enough to, to do things like pay for equipment or replace equipment, cover ongoing training expenses, because we always need to keep our skills updated. You know, pay bills on a on a regular basis and You know, put money away for retirement savings, you know, those sorts of things. If you don’t have the funds to do that, but you’re the work, you’re doing enough work, like you feel like you’re, you’re constantly busy, you know actually doing billable stuff, then you’re probably not charging enough. But what actually happens is most people who think that they’re not charging enough, are actually not generating enough activity to get to the level of income that they’re wasting. Yeah, exactly. And that could be because they’re not spending enough time selling that could be because they’re, you know, they’re closing how they close deals is off or inefficient, or that sort of thing. And so, when I’m working with a client, we start to dig into like another Freelancer in my coaching, we start to dig into what, what all of those things look like. And as you start to uncover what each of those numbers are and what they represent and how they work in your practice. You end up in the situation where you have all the levers that you can Paul was actually doing the motion a little too low, right? We saw got all these little little levers here that you can pull in control to, to actually get the the kind of practice and the kind of income from your practice that you’re looking for.

Very good. So you’re suggesting that they don’t check Instagram 20 times a day? Is that what you’re suggesting?

unless their businesses posting stuff on Instagram? Yeah. Looking at that at all.

What you’re suggesting is that freelancers plan in advance their expenses and all that, you know, that’s one of the things that freelancers don’t do they they just shoot from the hip, the vast majority of them. I think that’s why you and I exist is to help these dancers understand that they gotta treat their business like a business, right?

It’s, it’s true and a lot of a lot of freelancers. They get into this. I mean, my, my story is, many, many moons ago, I was like many other freelancers. I was let go from, from a job and I didn’t know what I was going to Do and I thought well, maybe I’ll hang my, my shingle out. And when I first started, I struggled in many of the same ways that a lot of freelancers do, where it’s like I, I don’t know where the next check is coming from and all that sort of thing. And what I found was that the more that I paid diligent attention to it, and built the discipline to treat it as an actual business, which is why I call it a freelance practice. In the same way as a, as an architect or a doctor or a you know, a lawyer has a practice as freelancers, we have practice practices, where the focus of the business is to serve our clients. And so a freelance practice, when you have that level of rigor and, and discipline, it really becomes a bunch of habits where once you’ve developed the muscle memory, a lot of the effort actually can go into maintaining and growing and focusing on the kind of kind of work that you want to do. As as a freelancer and yeah, so,

so what what did you block off? Like a certain afternoon on your calendar every week to or month to plan in advance? Do you have a process for that? or?

Yeah, so basically, every, every Friday for me is spent doing that. So I have Yeah, I have a, cuz, Friday, it’s diff, it’s difficult to schedule client meetings. Usually I know who, who wants to be the guy or woman who’s scheduling a business meeting on Friday afternoon

jerk.

Who wants to be that person? So yeah. So I use that time to reflect on the week that I had, I compare where I’m at within that month or quarter to what my goals had been. And I decided, you know, I’m not going to change anything in my, you know, what am I doing differently? What am I doing the same, it’s kind of if you were to sort of have three buckets where it’s like, start doing, keep doing and stop doing Right. Oh, yeah. And so that’s the, that’s the general approach that, that I take with it. From there, it’s, it’s really, that weekly increment keeps me keeps me on track, doing it either month and I actually do it more quarterly helps me keep on track with the with the, the, the year over year goals. And then because I’ve done I’ve done the work in that discipline of sort of keeping everything on track as I go if new opportunities emerge, or if emergencies come up or that sort of thing. I’ve already got my baseline and so I’m much more able to, to react, whether it’s deal with an emergency or take advantage of an opportunity. Whereas if you if you shoot by the hip, sometimes you have to let those things go because you don’t have the you don’t have the bandwidth to deal with them at that at that moment. And so I know

it’s great. Got to is it keeps stressing anxiety down a lot of times freelancers I get they have a lot of stress and anxiety about why where’s my next paycheck coming from? Like, if you already have your goals and you’ve reached your baseline, then you know you’re you have so a little bit of play room there. And you know, one of the two most hated words in the corporate world are working lunch, but I’ll tell you like every Friday I have a working lunch with myself that I scheduled twice as long as a normal lunch in my calendar. And that’s really just for like what you said like looking ahead, looking back and seeing what went wrong and my goals do I need to double down next week on something you know, so just taking it a working lunch and have reflecting on that just gets rid of so much stress and anxiety and helps set your whole your whole practice as you say, yeah, that’s where it should be. So

here’s what I do. So I I actually, I don’t do anything at lunch other than sometimes I’ll read sometimes I’ll like I do something leisure oriented at lunch. I use it a lot for going on walks because most of the time I’m sitting behind a computer, right? So. But what I do on Fridays is, I will go for a pint with some of my friends, I go for a beer, but I’ll go an hour before. And I’ll sit and I’ll have, you know, a much smaller pint. And I’ll, I’ll work on this this plan and we’ve sort of wrapped all of this into what me and a bunch of other freelancers call our fucking Friday. And I, if you need to bleep it out, it’s fine people, people will get what it is. Yeah, but this becomes a this becomes a ritual where we, we share successes, we celebrate failures, that sort of thing. And with other freelancers that sort of gives you the support the social support to continue on your on your plan.

Right, right. Very good. And you said smaller point, but I think you meant larger point, right?

It depends on how the plan works out.

I just, I’m just I don’t know you that well. I just want to guess. Are you a lager guy or an amber ale? I think you’re one Those two.

So I’m more of a an IPA guy or I’m a big fan of Porter’s. And so you know, an occasional stout. There’s a microbrew that is, that’s minutes from my house who that gets a lot of dangerous, man. Well, I don’t know if they have these in Canada yet, but I’m a big sour beer guy. Yeah, sour beers. I do. And I’ve, I’ve had a lot of them this summer, and I’m kind of tired of them. I’m actually looking. I’m looking forward to a lot of the a lot of the darker sort of stronger warmer beers that that winter usually brings. So nothing

wrong with that just can’t do that in the middle of the day. I don’t know if it’s my age or what but I’ll just want to take a nap after I hear you for like noon or two o’clock. So tell me a little bit about what are you doing now that fills your time?

So I I basically edit podcasts and I have my I switch practices a few years ago. I was a full time web developer and Now I am shifting into podcast development. And that’s, that’s going well. And I actually haven’t been doing a lot of work with freelance foundations the podcast in the last little bit because we’re giving that a break, but season seven will be starting up very soon. I have I have 13 episodes in, in production right now and that’s the full season is probably going to be double that. So. But yeah, that that starts October one.

Okay. foundation Give me the mission. What’s the mission to that?

freelance foundations? It’s a podcast for the independent workforce. And so I basically talk about freelancing and freelance related issues with sometimes with guests but a lot of times I’ll just pick a topic and I’ll define it and I’ll talk about I’ll share stories about you know, how things happen to me and how things have happened in in other freelancers practices where I’ve helped coach them or For for a number of years, I ran a co working space and so I worked with a lot of freelancers through through that. And so it’s just sharing the the things that I learned about freelancing in order to in order to help people build profitable freelance practices.

Very cool. How can our audience follow

you online and all your own cheese anywhere at anywhere online, basically at Trevor twining, Tw i n, G. And I’m, I’m fairly active on Twitter, I do a lot more reading and posting on Instagram, but I used to, and we’ll start again, shortly. I used to do a a weekly post on Instagram called Monday morning hustle, where it was like a very quick sort of set of tips. If you needed something, if you needed a way to sort of focus your freelance practice in some way and you needed like an idea. This was like a steady source of ideas that you could just sort of drop From and then I did it every Monday morning, and I kind of got out of the habit. But I’ve had a couple people reach out to me and say, is that coming back at any point? Yeah, so. So for me, that’s a really good social signal that that content was valuable. So I bet some more time and doing all the follow

you on Instagram. I am not I’m like you. But on Twitter, I read a lot, but I don’t post a lot. So I will find you on Twitter as well. And I’ll put all the links to all your social accounts and your website on our show notes and on our YouTube video and stuff. So thank you so much for joining us. I hope to have you on it sounds you sound like a resource that we can talk to about variety of topics. So I’d like to absolutely keep in touch with you, Mike. All right. Thanks. Thanks again. Thanks for having me.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes Trevor Twining (rhymes w/ FINE-ing) has freelanced for almost two decades. He coaches freelancers to build profitable practices, particularly improving sales skills. Trevor hosts Freelance Foundations, Show Notes Trevor Twining (rhymes w/ FINE-ing) has freelanced for almost two decades. He coaches freelancers to build profitable practices, particularly improving sales skills. Trevor hosts Freelance Foundations, a podcast that helps freelancers with both tactical and strategic issues. His own freelance practice focuses on podcast editing. He lives in Canada’s Niagara Region. Questions 1. … An interview with Trevor Twining: Freelancer Coach Read More » Mike Volkin clean 17:04
Freelance jobs that are always in demand https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-jobs-that-are-always-in-demand/ Fri, 20 Sep 2019 16:38:06 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3692 https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-jobs-that-are-always-in-demand/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-jobs-that-are-always-in-demand/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Freelance jobs that are always in demand Evergreen freelance jobs include: Marketing Programming Web design Artificial intelligence Consulting on how to consult Photography Writing Social media Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/freelance-jobs-that-are-always-in-demand/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Freelance jobs that are always in demand</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Freelance jobs that are always in demand

Evergreen freelance jobs include:

  • Marketing
  • Programming
  • Web design
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Consulting on how to consult
  • Photography
  • Writing
  • Social media

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to freelancing school. I am Mike Volkin. Today we are talking about freelancing jobs that are always in demand. Many times people come to me wanting to freelance but don’t know what they want to do yet. They want to start a new category. They want to change their career and do something new. Well, I’m going to give you some of my top evergreen freelance jobs and also jobs that are in demand that will not be going away anytime soon. First and foremost, I may be biased but I think the first one I should mention is marketing. Every business needs marketing at some point Mark Getting is one of those few jobs that touches just about every department within a company. So if you are interested in marketing, I would say consider starting with social media, which is one of my evergreen jobs on this list here. Social media is something that wasn’t even a skill set a couple decades ago or even a decade ago, but now is pretty much a part of our lives and doesn’t seem to be going away anytime soon. So if you want to be a social media specialist, even a specialist in one particular area of social media, I know one of our freelance master class instructor specializes in Instagram. So you can specialize in just one platform and get really really good at that one platform. You shouldn’t have any issues finding work on anything related to social media, but marketing in general is going to be in demand for as long as businesses exist. Another evergreen freelance job is programming like Marketing Pro Gaming is here to stay wasn’t an issue two or three decades ago, but now is an issue for many companies always having to update their software or even create software. So programming is always in high demand. So if you’re that analytical type that doesn’t mind sitting in front of a computer and coding, there’s a lot of great benefits to being a programming related Freelancer and just like marketing, you can specialize obviously, in one particular type of programming. Okay, web design websites are here to stay the internet is not going anywhere. So if you have a specific desire to match our your artistic, creative mind with your analytical mind, you may want to consider web design. It’s a perfect marriage of being able to kind of look and see what a company would need in terms of layout and design and then actually coding that into the website. Artificial Intelligence, something that’s not so much in demand right now but will be very Soon as we enter the robotic age, artificial intelligence is a very technical and analytical freelance skill, but does pay a lot. In fact, I heard on the radio the other day how artificial intelligence specialists are getting paid a salary. And some of these high tech firms have a million dollars or more a year. And these are obviously the best of the best and true artificial intelligence. I’m not talking about fake artificial intelligence. There are a lot of companies out there saying come check out our AI artificial intelligence, and they’re not artificial intelligence at all. It’s just some kind of deductive reasoning. Basically, if the user selects this, then the computer does that. But artificial intelligence is a little bit more complicated than that. By definition, it is a it’s basically a theory of how computer systems are able to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. So you’ve got examples like visual perceptions, speech recognition. decision making is a big one. And translation between languages. If you can specialize in any of those, oh my gosh, the opportunities to you are endless and the next few decades, if not more, another evergreen freelance job is consulting on how to consult. Now that seems might seem like a joke, but it’s absolutely true. There are a lot of people out there that consult specifically to teach people how to consult and be consultants, and even some posers out there. I won’t say their names, but there’s this one guy who’s very popular. He’s a great salesman, but he was a waiter. And he decided that he wanted to start a business on how to teach consultants how to consult, and his tips are so hilariously generic, generic

that he has a really cool website and he wears a really fancy suit, and he seems really important, but his tips are just terrible, but he is popular and there’s a lot of people talking about him and I’m just flabbergasted by how he does what he does. But if you’re one of those people that likes to Good advice, I would suggest getting some experience first but this one person I’m speaking of has one particular marketing funnel that he just takes people through and he tells consultants Listen, get yourself a website, throw up some paid ads, and, and then drive your consulting revenue that way, and people buy his stuff. It’s amazing. So if you want to consult on how to consult that is an option for you because consultants are a big part of today’s economy. photography and no matter what form photography comes in, whether it’s the printed out Polaroid old version, where you shake it and in the picture comes, comes out, you know, in on paper in your hand, like the old school ways or digital media, or who knows where photography will be probably 3d printed on your hand or some kind of hologram like in Star Wars, but photography is here to stay and people will always need photographers. No matter how good iPhones get or smartphones with with taking photographs yourself. There’s always going events, you know, weddings and whatnot where professional photographers will be needed. And of course, I would be remiss not to mention the largest makeup of the freelancer marketplace is writers. There’s always a need for the written word no matter what type if it’s instruction manuals or blog posts, writers are always in demand. So if you like to write, whether it’s the creative aspect of writing or the technical component of the layout and the grammar of writing, writing is always a great career. Alright, so I hope these evergreen freelance jobs spurred some ideas for you if you’re interested in either changing or developing a career in freelance.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Freelance jobs that are always in demand Evergreen freelance jobs include: Marketing Programming Web design Artificial intelligence Consulting on how to consult Photography Writing Social media Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strat... Show Notes: Freelance jobs that are always in demand Evergreen freelance jobs include: Marketing Programming Web design Artificial intelligence Consulting on how to consult Photography Writing Social media Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing … Freelance jobs that are always in demand Read More » Mike Volkin 7:00
How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-a-freelancer-train-himherself-at-sales/ Thu, 19 Sep 2019 16:34:40 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3690 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-a-freelancer-train-himherself-at-sales/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-a-freelancer-train-himherself-at-sales/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales? Have all your objections ready in advance Get your elevator pitch, USP and value proposition DOWN Have a story Learn to listen- Sales is NOT about fast-talking, “baffle ’em with BS”, bamboozling prospects by continuously bowling them over. Introverts listen more than they …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-a-freelancer-train-himherself-at-sales/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales?

  • Have all your objections ready in advance
  • Get your elevator pitch, USP and value proposition DOWN
  • Have a story
  • Learn to listen- Sales is NOT about fast-talking, “baffle ’em with BS”, bamboozling prospects by continuously bowling them over. Introverts listen more than they talk, so don’t worry if you’re an introvert
  • Truly understand how you can help a client
  • Take a sales course (or watch YouTube courses).
  • Read the book, “The Greatest Salesman in the World”

Raw Transcript

Welcome to another episode of freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin, the lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass. And today we’re going to be discussing how a freelancer can train him or herself at sales. So many times there are freelancers that have nothing to do with sales, but they have to sell themselves in order to get the job. So we’re going to talk to you about some easy barriers of entry that you can reduce to help you get that job. So first of all, I want you to have all of your objections writing in advance, think about all the objections a client would have, not only to hire you but to hire a freelancer in general. Okay, so once you write all those common questions out, in fact, it’s best practice to ask a friend family relative about, hey, if you were going to hire me for freelance work, what are some of the things that you would ask me and I want you to be able to have those in writing down in front of you print it out. So when you’re on the phone with a prospect, you can go through them now. little tip I have used to do this where I would write it all out in paragraph form and just reframe it. But it sounds like you’re reading a script. So what I would recommend is just get some bullet points down that you want to mention. So it just flows more nicely when you’re actually talking about it to a prospect when you’re answering those questions to a prospect. And the objections can vary so much. I mean, one of the objections that I used to get all the time now I don’t, but is when I charged, you know, my bill rate is $190 an hour. So I would get that objection, sometimes from clients, or prospects, rather, they’re not a client until they sign an agreement. But one of the objections is, you know, why would I hire somebody for $190 an hour that equals $300,000 a year? You know, I can’t afford that. I’m a small business. So I would have that objection. Ready. The another objection would be, you know, can you get why can’t you get this work done in two weeks as opposed to a month or, you know, it could be any type of objection in your industry. or type of work that you can write down and have in advance so you can speak through it much better. Okay? And if you also want to train yourself at sales it get your elevator pitch down your unique selling proposition otherwise called the USP, and your value proposition. Those are three big marketing communication pieces pieces that you need. I won’t go through each of those. We talked about those in detail at Freelancer masterclass, but your elevator pitch, your USP and your value proposition are absolutely crucial, not only for you to brand yourself moving forward, but to talk to prospects smoothly about how you best represent yourself. Those are the three things that you can think of well in advance that would really put you far and away in a better position than other freelancers who 99% of freelancers Don’t, don’t do that at all. So that would be great for you to have. Also, to get really good at sales. You You should have a story. I have a story. I talked about it in detail, actually two stories, depending on the prospect I’m talking to their true stories don’t make one up. But I talked about the different types of stories at Freelancer masterclass and how you can develop one. But for the purpose of this podcast, I’ll just let you know you should have a story that when your prospects ask you, you know, maybe why you got into this or they don’t even need to ask you that you know why you got into freelance and you should have that as part of your opening line and you’re talking to somebody is, you know, why you are a freelancer, what’s your passion behind it, so they can best relate to either you or the work that you do?

Learn to listen, a lot of people come to me and say, Mike, I’m not a I’m not an extrovert. I can’t do sales. Actually, the best salespeople are introverts. I’m an introvert you might not think it because of how fast I talk or or the amount of attention I quote unquote need to get For my success at my job, but believe me, I’ll tell you I’m an introvert, I would much rather be, you know, in a room with one or two people or even by myself doing work that I want to do, or, or having conversations I want to have, rather than being in a party like my wife, she’d always want to be surrounded by lots of people and be able to turn her head in any direction and be able to talk to someone different. That is not me, okay? I much prefer a one on one conversation. But if I’m on stage talking, or I get asked to speak in front of a large group, I have to kind of force myself to come out of my comfort zone and do that. But the best type of people to settle are introverts. You want to know why? Because they listen more than they talk. So don’t worry about if you’re an introvert, a great part of sales is learning to listen sales is not about fast talking. It’s not about battling them with BS. It’s not about bamboozling prospects by continuously boiling them over with your credentials. It’s about listening. So I want you to actively Listen, and if you want to Google how to actively listen, there are techniques behind that. So the best thing I can do to tell you how to actively listen is just two words Shut up. Just shut up. Just listen to your prospects talk and let them pour their hearts out in their pain points out at you. Okay? Couple more tips for your real quick and how to become better at sales and train yourself and sales is a truly understand how you can help a client too many freelancers honestly don’t know, they know what they like, but they don’t really know how they can help a client so I want you to do some soul searching and think about some pain points that you can specifically solve for clients. Okay, also take a sales course there’s lots of them and if you want go ahead and go to YouTube, and and just google how to sell or I know I don’t recommend getting this person any money, but Jordan Belfort The Wolf of Wall Street has a popular sales course it’s called sell me this pen I actually have it. But it’s it will help you understand how to say things to people. And how to persuade people and most importantly, how to gear a conversation towards what you want to talk about. That’s very important because if you’re leading a conversation, a conversation will most likely go in your direction. Okay, and the last tip I have for you is read the book, the greatest salesman in the world. If you are if you’re a reader, this is a great one that will teach you how to get into sales and how to not fear sales and how to really speak naturally to people. Okay, I hope these tips helped in terms of getting yourself into sales and feel like you’re selling without selling. These are some good tips for you. Good luck.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales? Have all your objections ready in advance Get your elevator pitch, USP and value proposition DOWN Have a story Learn to listen- Sales is NOT about fast-talking, “baffle ’em with BS”, Show Notes: How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales? Have all your objections ready in advance Get your elevator pitch, USP and value proposition DOWN Have a story Learn to listen- Sales is NOT about fast-talking, “baffle ’em with BS”, bamboozling prospects by continuously bowling them over. Introverts listen more than they … How can a freelancer train him or herself at sales? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 6:39
An Interview with Will Bachman of Umbrex- Find out how to scale your freelancing business https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-will-bachman-of-umbrex-find-out-how-to-scale-your-freelancing-business/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 17:08:58 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3746 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-will-bachman-of-umbrex-find-out-how-to-scale-your-freelancing-business/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-will-bachman-of-umbrex-find-out-how-to-scale-your-freelancing-business/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Find out how to scale your freelancing business with Will Bachman! Bio: Will Bachman, former nuclear-trained submarine officer and McKinsey alum. Co-founder of Umbrex, a global community connecting over 600 top-tier independent management consultants across 40 countries. Host of Unleashed – How to Thrive as an Independent Professional, an iTunes Careers Top 100 podcast. Graduate …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-will-bachman-of-umbrex-find-out-how-to-scale-your-freelancing-business/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview with Will Bachman of Umbrex- Find out how to scale your freelancing business</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Find out how to scale your freelancing business with Will Bachman!

Bio:

Will Bachman, former nuclear-trained submarine officer and McKinsey alum. Co-founder of Umbrex, a global community connecting over 600 top-tier independent management consultants across 40 countries. Host of Unleashed – How to Thrive as an Independent Professional, an iTunes Careers Top 100 podcast. Graduate of Harvard College (Physics, summa cum laude) and Columbia Business School. Will invites you to connect with him on LinkedIn.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success

brought to you by Freelancer masterclass

calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Okay, thank you for joining me today at Freelancer

school. Today we have with us a special guest will Bachman. He’s a formular I’m sorry, a former nuclear trained submarine officer and Mackenzie alumni. He is the co founder of rubrics, which is a global community connecting over 600 top tier independent management consultants across 40 different countries. And he is the host of one of my favorite podcast called unleashed how to thrive as an independent professional. I want to talk to him a little bit about that real quick to get started. But his podcast unleashed is an iTunes careers top 100 podcasts if you don’t subscribe to it, please do that right away. He is a graduate of Harvard College in physics Summa Cum Laude. And by the way, if that wasn’t good enough, he’s single commodity, and the Columbia Business School and I will invite you to connect with him on LinkedIn or I’ll put all the links in the show notes on both YouTube and the podcast. Well, thanks for joining me. Thank you. The pleasure unleashed the podcast. I love it. I don’t know if it’s a regular Is there a regular publication day?

Yes, we publish at least I call it weekly. Plus, we do at least one episode a week. We always do an interview episode on Monday. And then periodically they’ll be more of an essay type podcast, with just me talking episodes like 27 steps to set up your firm or recommendation on creating sample of sanitized work. So there’s some sap sins which appear periodically and then introduce every Monday.

Ok. Ok. So interviews on Monday Got that? Okay. I listened to your podcast and I’m at the gym and I was just wondering as they Thursday is unleashed. Is it a new one? Or, you know, I couldn’t quite get in that pattern. So thank you for explaining that. The first question I have for you,

I think I told you before, I know I told you before the interview that I

am a chemical chemical operations Sergeant or was in the army, and you are also a nuclear train submarine officer in the Navy. So, I certainly know that a lot of the lessons I learned in the army have carried over to my professional career. So I’m going to ask you the question that any of those lessons learned in the army as a nuclear train submarine officer carry on your professional career, especially as a self employed

professional? They sure did. When you’re,

you know, I think one of the key less the key skill for the 21st century, I think, is figuring out what to do next. And that was certainly something that was incumbent upon me as a, you know, in the military, particularly when you’re in port, and I was operating as the ship’s do. Officer kind of responsible for the whole ship for one day while everyone else was was off. Then kind of just figuring out what those next steps are and maintaining a list of all your action items, prioritizing those. That’s a skill that’s pretty widely transferable.

That’s true.

Yeah, I throw in one other one, which is the Navy is big on checklists and formal operating procedures. And that served me well both on operational improvement type projects, as well as you know, checklists are pretty widely applicable and useful any time that I have to do more than two things.

Yeah, in a freelancer masterclass, we turn we talk about AAR, after action review, which is what I learned in the army. It’s basically after you do a battlefield exercise or really any exercise where there’s multiple troops and you know, coverts involved, you would go through a checklist of what went good, what went bad, how to make it better. Did you guys also do that in the Navy, something similar,

Mike? Sure. And that’s, that’s a great example. And that’s A great practice that the army really does very well. Similar thing in the Navy, primarily after you know, something goes wrong, we always do an incident report. It’s a great practice to do on some periodic basis, I try to do it after every project wraps up. And also after the end of each week, just reflect back on what went well this week. What could I have done better, give yourself some feedback, it’s

really the best way to move. I do it in two main areas. I do it when I look at my monthly p&l for my company profit and loss. And I also do it after each prospect call. I want to know how it went, how I can improve maybe improve conversions. Maybe I talk too much or too little. Maybe I didn’t answer a question. So I always do a ours for four key areas of conversion of my company. So

this is like a written thing or just like in your mind, if you actually write it down and document

out. Now it’s in my mind, but for many years, I did a written and I had like an aggregate spreadsheet going so I can look at conversion numbers and all that stuff. So Yeah, I was I was very, I guess, adamant about procedures. I guess I still am. But everything was written back in the, in the day, you know, when I was trying to scale and have multiple employees now I’m kind of consolidating and trying to do a lot of it myself. I have a couple key employees I rely on but yeah, yeah, I just army taught me all those practices, you know. So let me ask you this. You own a company. you attended Harvard, Columbia, you on a farm, you wrote a children’s book, which I’ve done, by the way, we should talk about the chuck the children’s book. you’ve walked 800 kilometers to Spain. What’s your next goal? What do you got going on? You’re a very interesting, dynamic person.

Well, thanks, Mike. Let’s see. Um, you know, some of my goals going forward are number one, looking for ways to kind of grow the audience of my podcast unleashed. Put probably a lot more effort in the first 200 episodes. into creating content versus figuring out how do you grow the audience for that. So that’s, that’s one area working, improving the website for rubrics. We’re doing the directions, we’re working to create a community that connects top tier independent management consultants with one another. And we feel we’re really just getting started. We have little over 600 members now. But we see that as more and more people become independent consultants, or pursue that independent professional path, there’s more and more, you know, opportunity and need for to be know to create those connections. So I guess the third thing I mentioned is I just finished recording a 17 video course on how to set up your own consulting practice. And so that’s now being edited and getting ready for the website. So I’m hoping to have that live in three or four weeks.

Wow 70 videos that’s great Freelancer masterclass has 68 so you beat me by two, but we’re always adding some. So what is the the key word there was connects on? Let’s connect what is the purpose? What is the primary goal around connecting? Is it collaborating, sharing resources? Is it sharing leads and prospects? What’s the goal there?

Well, it’s all those things, Mike. There’s a big opportunity to just share lessons learned. You know, a lot of folks they leave a large consulting firm, maybe directly or they spend time You know, its head of strategy somewhere and then they said, Hey, I want to go set up my own practice. We know how to be consultants, right how to do consulting, but running a consulting practice is you know, with you with your show is much different thing. How do you write a statement of work, write a proposal, find an accountant, find a bookkeeper, find an attorney, do contracts, you know, do your taxes, finding a graphics person, all of these things? It’s not something that you learned when you were at a big professional services for

Yeah, very true.

Being able to have this hallway conversations with people going through something similar in a similar background, there’s a lot of value in that.

Yeah, yeah, I can definitely see the value of that collaboration. We have something called the inner circle referral network where all the freelance master class graduates get together and share resources, right. So you don’t have to you don’t have to tell me about collaboration, the importance of that super important. So what I like to do for these podcasts is give actionable advice. Something that people the audience, the listeners can take away. So let’s talk about scalability and freelancers, you know, even freelancers that are experienced, but mostly this question is geared towards beginner freelancers, one that are just starting out, and they can’t even imagine, you know, scaling your company to six figures or even beyond. So can you give our freelancers some advice on on how they can scale their business faster than maybe a normal Freelancer would who isn’t listening to the show or podcast you have any quick tips or actionable tips for them? I’ll put you on the spot there.

Yeah, sure. So I guess the first question is, is large what the first observation is that larger scaled is not necessarily more profitable. Very true. Yeah. So that’s a real decision to make. And I think that people shouldn’t feel obligated to scale. Just because like, you know, people say, Oh, you have a lifestyle business, you know, just one person, you can be a very profitable Freelancer as a one person shop. And if you want to go that route, then you can, you know, there’s only two dimensions, it’s pretty simple formula, what’s your utilization in terms of days per year, and your rate per day. So you can try to either get more utilization, or you can increase your rate per day. And the real way to increase your rates per day is increase the value that you can deliver to your clients by increasing your skills. Yeah. So that’s one path, right? So if you want to scale that direction, it’s about figuring out how you can deliver more value. And it’s, it’s skills but it’s also the relationships that you have, what assets you own. So can you bring Intellectual property to bear, can you be a connector and connect other people to that client? Right? What more value can deliver? If it’s a built, if it is about scaling in terms of if you’re trying to build a boutique practice as opposed to being a purely a freelancer? Well, I can get into that. Like, what what’s entailed in that if you want any kind of

Sure, yeah, please do. Yeah.

Alright. So for folks that want to go that path number one is, and I’ll grab this book off, because I love this book by David A fields. Highly recommend the irresistible consultants guide to winning clients by David A fields, right.

That’s my reading list. I haven’t seen that one before.

I’ve given out 100 copies of that book, and he really walks you through this. The first step is if you’re building a firm is figuring out what clients are you going to serve, and what problems are you going to work on? And, you know, David talks about when you’re thinking about problems, you want to work on the Problems are pervasive. Why clients have them. They’re expensive if not addressed in their urgent, even before you think about Do I have the skills to solve it is figuring out what those problems are. And coming up with a fishing line, we can crisply communicate that if you’re an individual, you can be a little bit more flexible. But if you’re building a firm, you have to really be known for something. So, and some people want to keep it somewhat broad and generic. But the broader you are, you think, Oh, I have a bigger target. So I’m going to get more client opportunities, but it actually works in reverse. So the narrower and more focused your service offering is, the more you’re going to be memorable and appeal to that audience. Right. So

target everyone, you’ll get no one that’s a common phrase. You know, I like to say so

there’s only so much jam and the broader spread the thinner this. I know

and it’s hard for freelancers to swallow they might think oh well the pool so big like I do search engine optimization. I don’t want to narrow myself down. Well, guess what, then you’re going to be just a sea of everybody else competing for the lowest possible price. And that’s not the way you want to win client. So,

versus I do search engine optimization for outdoor companies based in Seattle.

Right? Exactly.

Yeah. Now you’re, you know, focused on a niche,

you can build a very fine career just with that very targeted niche right there and have no issues getting clients.

So I mean, so that targeting is important. And then it’s, then there’s the infrastructure of your firm, and there’s building your team. So in terms of infrastructure, we could certainly probably spend, you know, like you said, You’ve done 68 videos, and we could spend the whole sessions on that. But certainly, having a CRM system in place is absolutely critical. I recommend pipe drive and I did an episode on on unleashed about that in Episode 172 about how to set it up for a boutique consulting practice. So you’re managing, you need to find some way to raise your visibility. I think there’s really two main ways to raise your visibility. One is through thought leadership, creating content like you’re doing Mike with your with your podcast, thought leadership and creating human interactions. So on the thought leadership side, there’s a whole is a wide range of channels you can choose. And it’s something you know, that could be a blog, podcasts, YouTube videos, white papers, LinkedIn posts, think of it and in some cases, if you do, pick one like podcasts, you can repurpose some of that content, turn it into blog posts or tweets or LinkedIn posts. And then you I think, thought leadership is critical creating some form of content because it’s a way to do to remind your advertising if you you know, creating content allows you to you know, post on LinkedIn regularly like hey, I just did this episode, I just published this white paper just published this article, just remind people That you exist, even if they don’t read it. Yeah, even if they don’t read it, you’re reminding people like oh, yeah, you know, Mike exists, yeah will exist. Number and part of that thought leadership if you can incorporate and actually involve your target clients in that content creation, that’s even better. Right? The major consulting firm thing is to pick some topic and then go survey 20 executives, and say we interview 20 executives, and then quote them and so forth in the in the thought leadership piece, and then you send it back out to them, and, you know, brief them on it, and they feel involved in it. So that’s the classic. The other part human interactions, you can think about one on one, and more than one, so the one on one, it’s, you know, there’s really in person meetings, phone calls and kind of electronic communications and emails. Yeah, my view No, I agree with David fields is really, in you think about the cost of those versus the benefit. The the benefit of one on one meeting of the impact that you have, is by far the highest, but it’s also by far the highest cost in terms of your time. Yeah, whereas emails are the opposite. It’s quick and easy, but it doesn’t really create that much memory phone calls are probably the sweet spot, in terms of it’s a warm medium. You know, it’s it’s a warm interaction, but it’s very low cost in terms of your time. So getting comfortable making a lot of phone calls it organizing more than one on one interaction, you know, organizing a small group breakfast of executives who are not competitive, but might have something to share with one another and you’re that connector. That’s another great way. So I’m kind of rambling on here to talk about is this you know, this is kind of the basis of lead generation is you just got to be got to remind people that you exist,

nothing can no matter what technology comes nothing replaces the in person one on one even though that is expensive in terms of time, and who knows how to Get there. I’ve flown across the country to meet clients before prospects but the conversion is just so much higher. And things like this like zoom. Help to they provide a bridge between phone calls and in person, right. So that’s always a good option.

Oh, yeah. Zoom is the way to go. I love zoom. I use it myself. And it’s, I mean, it’s definitely a couple steps above Delvon, and you’re seeing me I’m seeing you it’s a much warmer interaction than even the phone.

Exactly. So if you were to pick one mistake that freelancers typically make, but can avoid. What would that mistake be? What What advice would you give them to say don’t do this or do this, that most freelancers that don’t listen to content like this wouldn’t know?

All right. Okay. So I’ll give you probably your other guests and giving you like really profound ones. Let me give you a like a trivial one, but an easy one to avoid. Right. From day one, Lot of context is day one, start treating it. Like you’re truly a professional, right? Like you’re serious about this. Thinking about. And what that means is a couple implications of that is come up with a name for your firm and create an LLC. All right, get yourself a corporate entity. Don’t mess around just operating on your social security number treat it like a business. Yes. Let’s follow on piece of that is, you know, get branded email, whether use G Suite or some Microsoft thing. Don’t go around using an AOL com address, right or Yahoo. com. Yes.

Production and credibility when you do.

I mean, you wouldn’t hire like an accountant or attorney or bookkeeper that was going around using an aol.com address. It makes it seem like you know, they’re in the 90 So yeah, grow up. Treat it like a professional, you know, get a professional logo made. Get it perfect. You know, get a website, get business cards, get some correspondence. Guards Get yourself a PowerPoint load template if that’s what you do, you know branded and treat it like a professional.

Yes, absolutely good tips G Suite basic, which gives you an email address for your domain is $6 a month. You know, hey, a logo is $5 in fiber, fiber calm it’s not not that something that’s out of reach back in 30 years ago, you had to hire a graphic designer, an artist to make it custom logo, none of that is needed anymore. So take advantage of the times that we live in. So how can our audience find and follow you online and your advice? You got unbraced

un var x com? Is that right?

Yeah, it stands for umbrella of excellence. You MD RX calm and go to the unleashed tab. You can you can check out the podcast. Mike include my LinkedIn URL in the show notes. Well, let me just mention that you know, this is where you where you heard it. And yeah, those are the best places on the ground like this.

Yeah, put a link into your LinkedIn profile so people can connect with you as well. Thanks so much for joining us today. And yeah, touch base you very soon. Hopefully we can have you on a future.

Like it’s been a pleasure. Thanks for having me on the show.

Thank you. See you later.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show.

Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a

master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

 

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Show Notes: Find out how to scale your freelancing business with Will Bachman! Bio: Will Bachman, former nuclear-trained submarine officer and McKinsey alum. Co-founder of Umbrex, a global community connecting over 600 top-tier independent management c... Show Notes: Find out how to scale your freelancing business with Will Bachman! Bio: Will Bachman, former nuclear-trained submarine officer and McKinsey alum. Co-founder of Umbrex, a global community connecting over 600 top-tier independent management consultants across 40 countries. Host of Unleashed – How to Thrive as an Independent Professional, an iTunes Careers Top 100 podcast. Graduate … An Interview with Will Bachman of Umbrex- Find out how to scale your freelancing business Read More » Mike Volkin 19:34
How can I be better than my competition? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-be-better-than-my-competition/ Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:31:39 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3688 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-be-better-than-my-competition/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-be-better-than-my-competition/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How can I be better than my competition? Have a niche Have a brand Have a process around client communication Worry about value more than anything else Content, content, content Stalk your competitors Command respect Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-be-better-than-my-competition/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How can I be better than my competition?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How can I be better than my competition?

  • Have a niche
  • Have a brand
  • Have a process around client communication
  • Worry about value more than anything else
  • Content, content, content
  • Stalk your competitors
  • Command respect

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success

brought to you by Freelancer masterclass

calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Okay, thank you for joining me today at Freelancer

school. Today we have with us a special guest will Bachman. He’s a formular I’m sorry, a former nuclear trained submarine officer and Mackenzie alumni. He is the co founder of rubrics, which is a global community connecting over 600 top tier independent management consultants across 40 different countries. And he is the host of one of my favorite podcast called unleashed how to thrive as an independent professional. I want to talk to him a little bit about that real quick to get started. But his podcast unleashed is an iTunes careers top 100 podcasts if you don’t subscribe to it, please do that right away. He is a graduate of Harvard College in physics Summa Cum Laude. And by the way, if that wasn’t good enough, he’s single commodity, and the Columbia Business School and I will invite you to connect with him on LinkedIn or I’ll put all the links in the show notes on both YouTube and the podcast. Well, thanks for joining me. Thank you. The pleasure unleashed the podcast. I love it. I don’t know if it’s a regular Is there a regular publication day?

Yes, we publish at least I call it weekly. Plus, we do at least one episode a week. We always do an interview episode on Monday. And then periodically they’ll be more of an essay type podcast, with just me talking episodes like 27 steps to set up your firm or recommendation on creating sample of sanitized work. So there’s some sap sins which appear periodically and then introduce every Monday.

Ok. Ok. So interviews on Monday Got that? Okay. I listened to your podcast and I’m at the gym and I was just wondering as they Thursday is unleashed. Is it a new one? Or, you know, I couldn’t quite get in that pattern. So thank you for explaining that. The first question I have for you,

I think I told you before, I know I told you before the interview that I

am a chemical chemical operations Sergeant or was in the army, and you are also a nuclear train submarine officer in the Navy. So, I certainly know that a lot of the lessons I learned in the army have carried over to my professional career. So I’m going to ask you the question that any of those lessons learned in the army as a nuclear train submarine officer carry on your professional career, especially as a self employed

professional? They sure did. When you’re,

you know, I think one of the key less the key skill for the 21st century, I think, is figuring out what to do next. And that was certainly something that was incumbent upon me as a, you know, in the military, particularly when you’re in port, and I was operating as the ship’s do. Officer kind of responsible for the whole ship for one day while everyone else was was off. Then kind of just figuring out what those next steps are and maintaining a list of all your action items, prioritizing those. That’s a skill that’s pretty widely transferable.

That’s true.

Yeah, I throw in one other one, which is the Navy is big on checklists and formal operating procedures. And that served me well both on operational improvement type projects, as well as you know, checklists are pretty widely applicable and useful any time that I have to do more than two things.

Yeah, in a freelancer masterclass, we turn we talk about AAR, after action review, which is what I learned in the army. It’s basically after you do a battlefield exercise or really any exercise where there’s multiple troops and you know, coverts involved, you would go through a checklist of what went good, what went bad, how to make it better. Did you guys also do that in the Navy, something similar,

Mike? Sure. And that’s, that’s a great example. And that’s A great practice that the army really does very well. Similar thing in the Navy, primarily after you know, something goes wrong, we always do an incident report. It’s a great practice to do on some periodic basis, I try to do it after every project wraps up. And also after the end of each week, just reflect back on what went well this week. What could I have done better, give yourself some feedback, it’s

really the best way to move. I do it in two main areas. I do it when I look at my monthly p&l for my company profit and loss. And I also do it after each prospect call. I want to know how it went, how I can improve maybe improve conversions. Maybe I talk too much or too little. Maybe I didn’t answer a question. So I always do a ours for four key areas of conversion of my company. So

this is like a written thing or just like in your mind, if you actually write it down and document

out. Now it’s in my mind, but for many years, I did a written and I had like an aggregate spreadsheet going so I can look at conversion numbers and all that stuff. So Yeah, I was I was very, I guess, adamant about procedures. I guess I still am. But everything was written back in the, in the day, you know, when I was trying to scale and have multiple employees now I’m kind of consolidating and trying to do a lot of it myself. I have a couple key employees I rely on but yeah, yeah, I just army taught me all those practices, you know. So let me ask you this. You own a company. you attended Harvard, Columbia, you on a farm, you wrote a children’s book, which I’ve done, by the way, we should talk about the chuck the children’s book. you’ve walked 800 kilometers to Spain. What’s your next goal? What do you got going on? You’re a very interesting, dynamic person.

Well, thanks, Mike. Let’s see. Um, you know, some of my goals going forward are number one, looking for ways to kind of grow the audience of my podcast unleashed. Put probably a lot more effort in the first 200 episodes. into creating content versus figuring out how do you grow the audience for that. So that’s, that’s one area working, improving the website for rubrics. We’re doing the directions, we’re working to create a community that connects top tier independent management consultants with one another. And we feel we’re really just getting started. We have little over 600 members now. But we see that as more and more people become independent consultants, or pursue that independent professional path, there’s more and more, you know, opportunity and need for to be know to create those connections. So I guess the third thing I mentioned is I just finished recording a 17 video course on how to set up your own consulting practice. And so that’s now being edited and getting ready for the website. So I’m hoping to have that live in three or four weeks.

Wow 70 videos that’s great Freelancer masterclass has 68 so you beat me by two, but we’re always adding some. So what is the the key word there was connects on? Let’s connect what is the purpose? What is the primary goal around connecting? Is it collaborating, sharing resources? Is it sharing leads and prospects? What’s the goal there?

Well, it’s all those things, Mike. There’s a big opportunity to just share lessons learned. You know, a lot of folks they leave a large consulting firm, maybe directly or they spend time You know, its head of strategy somewhere and then they said, Hey, I want to go set up my own practice. We know how to be consultants, right how to do consulting, but running a consulting practice is you know, with you with your show is much different thing. How do you write a statement of work, write a proposal, find an accountant, find a bookkeeper, find an attorney, do contracts, you know, do your taxes, finding a graphics person, all of these things? It’s not something that you learned when you were at a big professional services for

Yeah, very true.

Being able to have this hallway conversations with people going through something similar in a similar background, there’s a lot of value in that.

Yeah, yeah, I can definitely see the value of that collaboration. We have something called the inner circle referral network where all the freelance master class graduates get together and share resources, right. So you don’t have to you don’t have to tell me about collaboration, the importance of that super important. So what I like to do for these podcasts is give actionable advice. Something that people the audience, the listeners can take away. So let’s talk about scalability and freelancers, you know, even freelancers that are experienced, but mostly this question is geared towards beginner freelancers, one that are just starting out, and they can’t even imagine, you know, scaling your company to six figures or even beyond. So can you give our freelancers some advice on on how they can scale their business faster than maybe a normal Freelancer would who isn’t listening to the show or podcast you have any quick tips or actionable tips for them? I’ll put you on the spot there.

Yeah, sure. So I guess the first question is, is large what the first observation is that larger scaled is not necessarily more profitable. Very true. Yeah. So that’s a real decision to make. And I think that people shouldn’t feel obligated to scale. Just because like, you know, people say, Oh, you have a lifestyle business, you know, just one person, you can be a very profitable Freelancer as a one person shop. And if you want to go that route, then you can, you know, there’s only two dimensions, it’s pretty simple formula, what’s your utilization in terms of days per year, and your rate per day. So you can try to either get more utilization, or you can increase your rate per day. And the real way to increase your rates per day is increase the value that you can deliver to your clients by increasing your skills. Yeah. So that’s one path, right? So if you want to scale that direction, it’s about figuring out how you can deliver more value. And it’s, it’s skills but it’s also the relationships that you have, what assets you own. So can you bring Intellectual property to bear, can you be a connector and connect other people to that client? Right? What more value can deliver? If it’s a built, if it is about scaling in terms of if you’re trying to build a boutique practice as opposed to being a purely a freelancer? Well, I can get into that. Like, what what’s entailed in that if you want any kind of

Sure, yeah, please do. Yeah.

Alright. So for folks that want to go that path number one is, and I’ll grab this book off, because I love this book by David A fields. Highly recommend the irresistible consultants guide to winning clients by David A fields, right.

That’s my reading list. I haven’t seen that one before.

I’ve given out 100 copies of that book, and he really walks you through this. The first step is if you’re building a firm is figuring out what clients are you going to serve, and what problems are you going to work on? And, you know, David talks about when you’re thinking about problems, you want to work on the Problems are pervasive. Why clients have them. They’re expensive if not addressed in their urgent, even before you think about Do I have the skills to solve it is figuring out what those problems are. And coming up with a fishing line, we can crisply communicate that if you’re an individual, you can be a little bit more flexible. But if you’re building a firm, you have to really be known for something. So, and some people want to keep it somewhat broad and generic. But the broader you are, you think, Oh, I have a bigger target. So I’m going to get more client opportunities, but it actually works in reverse. So the narrower and more focused your service offering is, the more you’re going to be memorable and appeal to that audience. Right. So

target everyone, you’ll get no one that’s a common phrase. You know, I like to say so

there’s only so much jam and the broader spread the thinner this. I know

and it’s hard for freelancers to swallow they might think oh well the pool so big like I do search engine optimization. I don’t want to narrow myself down. Well, guess what, then you’re going to be just a sea of everybody else competing for the lowest possible price. And that’s not the way you want to win client. So,

versus I do search engine optimization for outdoor companies based in Seattle.

Right? Exactly.

Yeah. Now you’re, you know, focused on a niche,

you can build a very fine career just with that very targeted niche right there and have no issues getting clients.

So I mean, so that targeting is important. And then it’s, then there’s the infrastructure of your firm, and there’s building your team. So in terms of infrastructure, we could certainly probably spend, you know, like you said, You’ve done 68 videos, and we could spend the whole sessions on that. But certainly, having a CRM system in place is absolutely critical. I recommend pipe drive and I did an episode on on unleashed about that in Episode 172 about how to set it up for a boutique consulting practice. So you’re managing, you need to find some way to raise your visibility. I think there’s really two main ways to raise your visibility. One is through thought leadership, creating content like you’re doing Mike with your with your podcast, thought leadership and creating human interactions. So on the thought leadership side, there’s a whole is a wide range of channels you can choose. And it’s something you know, that could be a blog, podcasts, YouTube videos, white papers, LinkedIn posts, think of it and in some cases, if you do, pick one like podcasts, you can repurpose some of that content, turn it into blog posts or tweets or LinkedIn posts. And then you I think, thought leadership is critical creating some form of content because it’s a way to do to remind your advertising if you you know, creating content allows you to you know, post on LinkedIn regularly like hey, I just did this episode, I just published this white paper just published this article, just remind people That you exist, even if they don’t read it. Yeah, even if they don’t read it, you’re reminding people like oh, yeah, you know, Mike exists, yeah will exist. Number and part of that thought leadership if you can incorporate and actually involve your target clients in that content creation, that’s even better. Right? The major consulting firm thing is to pick some topic and then go survey 20 executives, and say we interview 20 executives, and then quote them and so forth in the in the thought leadership piece, and then you send it back out to them, and, you know, brief them on it, and they feel involved in it. So that’s the classic. The other part human interactions, you can think about one on one, and more than one, so the one on one, it’s, you know, there’s really in person meetings, phone calls and kind of electronic communications and emails. Yeah, my view No, I agree with David fields is really, in you think about the cost of those versus the benefit. The the benefit of one on one meeting of the impact that you have, is by far the highest, but it’s also by far the highest cost in terms of your time. Yeah, whereas emails are the opposite. It’s quick and easy, but it doesn’t really create that much memory phone calls are probably the sweet spot, in terms of it’s a warm medium. You know, it’s it’s a warm interaction, but it’s very low cost in terms of your time. So getting comfortable making a lot of phone calls it organizing more than one on one interaction, you know, organizing a small group breakfast of executives who are not competitive, but might have something to share with one another and you’re that connector. That’s another great way. So I’m kind of rambling on here to talk about is this you know, this is kind of the basis of lead generation is you just got to be got to remind people that you exist,

nothing can no matter what technology comes nothing replaces the in person one on one even though that is expensive in terms of time, and who knows how to Get there. I’ve flown across the country to meet clients before prospects but the conversion is just so much higher. And things like this like zoom. Help to they provide a bridge between phone calls and in person, right. So that’s always a good option.

Oh, yeah. Zoom is the way to go. I love zoom. I use it myself. And it’s, I mean, it’s definitely a couple steps above Delvon, and you’re seeing me I’m seeing you it’s a much warmer interaction than even the phone.

Exactly. So if you were to pick one mistake that freelancers typically make, but can avoid. What would that mistake be? What What advice would you give them to say don’t do this or do this, that most freelancers that don’t listen to content like this wouldn’t know?

All right. Okay. So I’ll give you probably your other guests and giving you like really profound ones. Let me give you a like a trivial one, but an easy one to avoid. Right. From day one, Lot of context is day one, start treating it. Like you’re truly a professional, right? Like you’re serious about this. Thinking about. And what that means is a couple implications of that is come up with a name for your firm and create an LLC. All right, get yourself a corporate entity. Don’t mess around just operating on your social security number treat it like a business. Yes. Let’s follow on piece of that is, you know, get branded email, whether use G Suite or some Microsoft thing. Don’t go around using an AOL com address, right or Yahoo. com. Yes.

Production and credibility when you do.

I mean, you wouldn’t hire like an accountant or attorney or bookkeeper that was going around using an aol.com address. It makes it seem like you know, they’re in the 90 So yeah, grow up. Treat it like a professional, you know, get a professional logo made. Get it perfect. You know, get a website, get business cards, get some correspondence. Guards Get yourself a PowerPoint load template if that’s what you do, you know branded and treat it like a professional.

Yes, absolutely good tips G Suite basic, which gives you an email address for your domain is $6 a month. You know, hey, a logo is $5 in fiber, fiber calm it’s not not that something that’s out of reach back in 30 years ago, you had to hire a graphic designer, an artist to make it custom logo, none of that is needed anymore. So take advantage of the times that we live in. So how can our audience find and follow you online and your advice? You got unbraced

un var x com? Is that right?

Yeah, it stands for umbrella of excellence. You MD RX calm and go to the unleashed tab. You can you can check out the podcast. Mike include my LinkedIn URL in the show notes. Well, let me just mention that you know, this is where you where you heard it. And yeah, those are the best places on the ground like this.

Yeah, put a link into your LinkedIn profile so people can connect with you as well. Thanks so much for joining us today. And yeah, touch base you very soon. Hopefully we can have you on a future.

Like it’s been a pleasure. Thanks for having me on the show.

Thank you. See you later.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show.

Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a

master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How can I be better than my competition? Have a niche Have a brand Have a process around client communication Worry about value more than anything else Content, content, content Stalk your competitors Command respect Raw Transcript Get read... Show Notes: How can I be better than my competition? Have a niche Have a brand Have a process around client communication Worry about value more than anything else Content, content, content Stalk your competitors Command respect Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to … How can I be better than my competition? Read More » Mike Volkin 8:08
An Interview With Andrew Lee Miller – Learn Growth Marketing https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-andrew-lee-miller-learn-growth-marketing/ Tue, 17 Sep 2019 21:11:03 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3742 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-andrew-lee-miller-learn-growth-marketing/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-andrew-lee-miller-learn-growth-marketing/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Andrew Lee Miller has spent over 13 years growth hacking startup wins, including 5 years in Dubai and 5 years in Silicon Valley. Since his third exit as Head of Marketing, he’s launched and grown tech projects in over 15 countries, driving traction for over $22,000,000 in funding rounds as a consultant via …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-andrew-lee-miller-learn-growth-marketing/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview With Andrew Lee Miller – Learn Growth Marketing</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Andrew Lee Miller has spent over 13 years growth hacking startup wins, including 5 years in Dubai and 5 years in Silicon Valley. Since his third exit as Head of Marketing, he’s launched and grown tech projects in over 15 countries, driving traction for over $22,000,000 in funding rounds as a consultant via his company, GrowthExpertz, with a Z, including launching a new dating app for Tinder last year that ended up being internally acquired by Match.com. He has also lectured in over a dozen countries about low-budget growth hacking strategies, worked with both 500 startups and YCombinator projects, written for StartupGrind, StartupNation and INC magazine. Andrew also launched an interactive online growth hacking course that teaches unfunded startup founders how to build scalable organic growth themselves, without any outsourcing or paid advertising. Andrew can be found online by simply googling “AndrewStartups”.
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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Alright, thank you for joining me with freelancers school. Today I have with me Andrew Lee Miller, who spent over 13 years growth hacking startup wins, including five years in Dubai and five years in Silicon Valley. And since his third exit as head of marketing, he’s launched and grown tech companies in over 15 countries driving traction over 22 million in funding rounds as a consultant via his company, which is growth experts with a Z including launching a new dating app for Tinder last year that ended up being internally acquired by none other than match.com. If that’s not enough, he is also lectured. Over a dozen countries about low budget growth hacking strategies, one of my favorite strategies, working in both 500 startups and Y Combinator projects. He’s written for Startup Grind startup nation and magazine. Andrew is also launched an interactive online growth hacking course, which we’ll talk about, that teaches unfunded startup founders how to build scalable organic growth themselves without any outsourcing or paid advertising. So Andrew can be found online by simply googling Andrew startups. So today, I figured, Andrew, welcome to the show, by the way.

Thank you.

Today I’m having an open conversation about how freelancers can bring in their first few clients. I talked to a lot of freelancers, as you can imagine, and many of them are startups, startup freelancers, part timers looking to be full timers, and they always ask me how can I bring in my first few clients. So given all of your growth hacking strategies, your endless knowledge on, on, on growth hacking? What Some of the quick easy wins that a freelancer can do to bring in their first client.

So I think there’s two things I can talk about I could talk about specific channels or I can tell exactly how I got started. So after the third exit, I went to a convention called hustle con if you have you’re in the Bay Area, you can go to the dude in New York to It’s amazing. And I went with the intention of finding consulting clients but I was you know, as a freelancer, but I just didn’t care what people would pay I was totally focused on the value. So the first tip is, don’t worry about what you’re going to charge someone that first client just won’t focus on crushing it for them remotely. And whether if you’re there in person or not, but just really focused on crushing it for them and getting paid for it. So a lot of times if you’ve never done the work as a consultant, some people will even start for free. So I did I started actually by bartering so with, you know, small businesses, I’ll barter with you for some marketing help. Then I started to get my confidence up. started charging more and more, I think I started just 1500 dollars a month. Let me focus on really crushing it for you, then I get my confidence up, then I get case studies, and then I can raise my rate up. So I think the first piece of advice is just really get that first company in the door, that first client in the door will matter what they’re going to pay you work as hard as you can to crush it and make it a successful testimonial. And then you can just move your rate up and you can start charging what you want. So that’s the first tip. But as far as the first channel, I think you should go to it’s really

hold on. Can we talk? I have a question about that really quick. So you went to her? Right hustle con, which I’ve heard of it never been to us. I’m gonna go are you going to the next one? Or

if I’m in America? Yeah, sure. Yeah, by

the way, you’re in Thailand right now. Right Roman.

This was I’m actually I I always I lived in Oakland, where the where the convention was so I wrote their press release. I even growth packed. Getting into the event. I wrote their press release one year so they gave me a ticket the next year. I gave them some marketing advice. I wrote the blog I think as well, but so I didn’t have any expectations. But I spent the whole conference in the lobby just giving free marketing advice to founders. So I think one of the biggest tips is really just focusing on creating value. You know, it feels really stressful when you’re starting out as a freelancer, you want to just sell people sell people sell people, but everybody’s out there selling so you could go to a platform like Upwork you can go to other platforms and really try and find micro jobs there. But if you really focus on just creating value and really helping people, the jobs are going to come so I was in lobby the for the eight hour day just you know, I wrote like need free marketing advice or something on a white shirt and permanent marker. And why why can you get free market advice and like I said, I just had my third exit as the marketing person or somebody just had third exit, need marketing advice. And then so there was a line of people just asking, Hey, I’ve got this problem. They’ve got this problem. And I, you know, some that really liked the advice would give me their card and then I followed up with them and I clicked To 1500 dollar a month clients right outside of that event or right after, after I moved to Nicaragua, you can’t really live on $3,000 a month in the Bay Area, my rent was half that at least. So I moved to Nicaragua for six months at $300 a month rent. And I didn’t try and upsell those clients, I didn’t try and bring on other clients, I just focused on crushing it for them. For six months, I mean, I was still making 10 times my rent, so I didn’t have to worry about the top of the funnel and money coming in. Instead, I just worried about crushing it for those clients, six months. My goal, my goal as a consultant and as a freelancer is to get them to outgrow it, get them to outgrow me within six to 12 months, so that they need a full time marketing hire and a team and then I help them to hire and train that team and then hand over everything. So I did that with those clients within those six months. And then the next client I was like, Well, I know I did $10,000 worth of work for these guys, but I’m going to go in at 5000 and then I literally closed my The first person I pitched that 5000 because the amount of work that I did for this other company at 1500, which I didn’t tell them, yeah. How many five? Yeah, you know, like, because it’s still full time work, you’re still getting this guy from San Francisco. So it’s just basically about increasing your confidence in that building. Right?

So your advice is just to get out there. I know a lot of freelancers are introverts. As as myself, I don’t see myself going to an event. I’ve been there. I’ve done that. But I always encourage freelancers to go outside their comfort zone and do some kind of prospecting. But I really like that idea going with a blank t shirt writing in like a marker like, Hey, you need design helping each new market out. Really cool. So you didn’t have a booth or anything. You just went there and you started mingling. And people were coming up to

you ever pay for a booth? No, I’m all about growth hacking about getting shit for free. And so I worked with the startup founder A long time ago, we were in the travel space. And we looked at the cost of booths at events and he was like, I’m just gonna go and talk to people and so, especially being in San Francisco, I would say 30% of all Good events happened in San Francisco or New York, you can just fly to either of them and literally be in the lobby and you’ll get 50% also targeting people on social media before the event and saying that you’re going to be there you can line up meetings in the lobbies like, like crazy like but

a lot of people released their, their their exhibitor list, right, and even attendee list before the show, so you can just follow them all on on Facebook and Twitter. I’ve done that before. When I was attending an accelerator program for startup investors, and it worked out very well. By the time I got the show, everybody knew me. And I knew that everybody knows you

knew the hashtag using the hashtag of the event is really good. But if you’re a super introvert, let me just touch on a couple like digital channels. So if you’re listening to this and you’re thinking like going to event is impossible for me, you can do the digital version of that. So you can use a tool called Hootsuite or Tweet Deck, and you can look at people griping or complaining about the problems that you’re able to solve. And you can direct message you can respond to people at scale. It’s really easy. So tweet deck and Hootsuite these are search engines for social media. You can search on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook by keyword or hashtag. And then you can so if someone’s saying, God, the design of my website sucks, I really need help. Obviously, there’s other freelancers out there doing this. So you need to be the most valuable message but you can offer them a free 20 minute chat with you digitally, you don’t have to step outside your comfort zone and say, hey, I’ve got 10 years experience, I’d love to give you some free advice here. Here’s my calendly link to book a call with me. And you know, you’re not focused on selling them in that call, you’re just giving them as much advice as possible. And then you know, after the call, you can send them by the way, these are some things that I do you know, I’m freelancer, you know, if you’re interested in following up, these are the products that it’s that I have are the ways that I can help you. So there’s the digital, that’s one thing I think you can do for free. You can you can also give those same posts on groups. So go into group and I’m a 10 year design expert or growth hacker and recently starting my freelancing business and I’m for one week only. I love this Group I’ve been getting a lot of value from this group, I would love to give anybody a free 10 minute call you can, you know, or do an ask an AMA on Reddit. So I’ve done those a couple times. And ama if you’re listening and you don’t know anything about Reddit as an Ask me anything, it’s literally you giving yourself to the community for about an eight hour period of just answering questions. I mean, it takes forever, but it’s really valuable. I personally did that on the entrepreneur subreddit, maybe six months ago, and it got 500 upvotes thousands of comments. And you can still find it on there. I just wrote on a 10 year Facebook ads expert giving away any free advice for the day to entrepreneurs. And it didn’t really move top of the needle for like the big big consulting, but I got a lot of books, I do add reviews for $500. I’ll dive into your ad campaigns and help you figure out the problems the targeting mistakes, the wording problems, you know, and I got a lot of those clients out of that. So it’s just good for giving back. You shouldn’t think about how am I going to make money it’s how can I give back Two people and then the money will just come.

Yeah, interesting. We haven’t talked about anaise. before. I haven’t done one, but I know freelancers who’ve done it in the past, so basically, you would sign up with a Reddit account. Ama for those of you don’t know, stand for Ask me anything. So you go into a Reddit account and what do you do you suggest to the owner of the board or if there is one, and if you say, listen, I’d like to do an MBA on an MBA on this particular day or what’s the process there?

Yeah, so you you messaged the moderators of the board. I like entrepreneur, if depending on what your industry is, or who your target demographic is, or what problems you think you can solve. If it’s a design one, you might want to do it on design, or maybe not you want to go on entrepreneur or startup subreddit, but you messaged the moderator. This is the value I can create. I’m interested in doing this and your be transparent. You know, like, I’m starting out my freelancing business. So I’ve been told by my mentor to give away as much free advice as possible. So not going to upsell these people but I’m really interested and then you don’t have to upsell people. They see See that you’re a thought leader and that you’re an expert. And then they start to dm you and they start to slide in your inbox. And they start to I mean, I got messages through my website messages through social media. And so it comes naturally to that’s one thing, you can do an AMA. You can do it on Facebook groups as well. So you messaged the owner of the Facebook group and you say, you know, I want to do an AMA on your Facebook group. We can do it on video, I can respond to questions that people have. And so, but again, the mindset is really just about creating value.

Okay, well, that’s a really good strategy. We can talk about that more in detail later on. I want to talk about maybe some setbacks that you’ve had in your career, maybe like one or two that stand out, were you like, wow, I learned my lesson there. I won’t do that again. I’m gonna I haven’t like prepared these questions in advance for you. So I’m kind of putting you on the spot, but it’s a one thing that really stuck out over the course of your career said, Wow, that was a bad mistake. Maybe I should do that again. And something I can easily teach other freelancers, not still Yeah,

so as a freelancer, you know, when you do get a lot of work coming inbound, you think that that gravy train is going to last forever, and you stop Focusing on the b2b marketing, right, I’m just focusing on crushing it for these clients. But that isn’t always the case. And you need a steady pipeline of new clients coming in as new, older clients are going out. And it’s really difficult to get that down to a science. And you know, it’s difficult at the end of the day, you know, after working five or 10, or whatever hours to then go back to the top of the funnel, and create more content and put out more blog posts and make more videos and reach out to more companies and offer yourself but you got to keep doing that. And I think a mistake that I made was, you know, 2017 was an unbelievable year for me, and like, just everything just came inbound and 2018 was also pretty good 2019 I don’t know if it’s people feel an impending recession or Trump’s going crazy or whatever it is, but I’ve had to work a lot harder at my level to even to put outbound stuff out there and I never had to do that before as a consultant. You know, like, I had PR from the last exit. Like I said, I went to these events and I really just focused on my network. But since I maybe also been traveling a lot more and left San Francisco where your network is tight, but I really feel like a big lesson for me has been you know keep that pipeline warm and keep that top of the funnel rich

Freelancer masterclass we call that a dp always be prospecting and we talked about like dry spells and whole class on and like sometimes your seasonal variations depending what type of freelance you are. Sometimes there’s an economic variations like you would mention that may or may not be affecting the economy and freelancers and sometimes I just mentioned the seasonality it’s like you know, maybe you’re maybe if you’re an e commerce marketing expert, maybe fourth quarter is like super hot because everybody needs marketers in the fourth quarter I think we’re most of the online sales occur and then the first quarter just kind of is dry. So you always have to have that that pipeline going so that’s right. You mentioned earlier Tweet Deck. And for those of you don’t know that is a live streaming keyword based Twitter. Search, right. I’ve used that before. So you can search hashtags and having streaming on your computer. And you had mentioned the value of, of, you know, providing better value like a freelancer can reach out to you. But I think TweetDeck is really used for the timeliness of it. Sometimes you’re not, you might not even be the best value, or even the best match for a client. But if you’re the first one to reach out to them, and show them that your solution to our problems, then you can probably get the job, you know, that way just by being timely, more so than people. Right?

Right. And I think the goal is to just really get them to chat with you and provide a much so much value that they’re like screw anybody else because no one else is going to focus on creating value for that. I think that’s really how you win is you know, like, Oh, I have an article I wrote that’ll help you write on there and just really creating value, then they go this guy or girl is the most helpful. I’m going to work with them because I trust them more than people try to sell me and take my money. So that should be the focus.

How much of your work is referral work at this point?

What percentage 75% I think a good It wasn’t

like that when you got started right?

It was probably wasn’t like that. It wasn’t like that. But I also hadn’t been a consultant. So I, you know, people had been coming inbound to me for years as when I had full time marketing jobs. And I said, No, I’m not available. So putting myself out there really taking the plunge. I think like, and really posting publicly that I was out there, as a consultant, a lot of referrals really started. And you know, the proof is in the pudding, right? So if you if you’re a designer, and you know, you’re not sure if you want to be a freelancer, if you’ve got an amazing portfolio, then you’re going to be able to create and same thing with marketers, it’s all tracked, and, you know, qualitative quantitative right there, I can prove the numbers that I’ve gotten the companies that I’ve worked for, that have exited. So the referrals keep coming and I’m really happy and very blessed of that. And it is much harder to pitch and sell. So if you can keep the referral game strong and that’s definitely the easiest thing to do. Much easier

to bring a referral client in the door right not only for, you know, closing them, but also for charging them more along What you think you deserve rather than trying to, you know, I tend to not negotiate with referral clients at all. They’ll just I’ll just tell them, you know, this is what I’m going to charge you. And they were like, Yeah, I heard great things. So you know how absolutely let’s get on board.

If anybody comes, if anybody comes inbound to me, then they already you know, they saw me speak publicly, they read an article I wrote, then there is no negotiation, you know, like, I’m not going you know, go ahead and talk to someone else hire a junior marketer come back in six months, and they’ve made the mistakes or you haven’t gotten the work done and that’s fine. I, I find that you know, you don’t want to be offended and burn a bridge or anything, but anybody that tries to cut you down for what you’re charging. I think that’s another piece of advice from sure you help freelancers? I actually, that’s probably one of the biggest things for my fellow freelancers are like how do you charge money? How do people on Reddit that I give advice to you know, it’s, it’s if you’re I focused on putting full time working, I know we’ve chatted about our different work focus. Instead of optimizing for what I’m going to charge I optimize for the month. A value I can put out. And if you think that you’re doing as much as a full time hire, then that’s what you that’s what you should be charging. Don’t worry that you’re not in their office, let them worry about it’s a results oriented work environment. These are freelancing, you know what I mean? So yeah, just other results.

Yeah, very much so especially in the marketing field. So, before I asked you where our audience can can find you and follow you online, I want I have one last question. I would like to ask you talked about your successful speaker. It’s a great way to build a brand a great way to develop leads. So how does someone who’s interested in getting up on stage and developing a speaking tour or even even something just local like what’s, what’s your goal is like a first step to get started? Is it just find something to talk about and develop a presentation or is it something else?

Yeah, developed something valuable to talk about. So for me, I actually synthesize my growth hacking course. The course that walk that has 45 HD videos and blah, blah, blah, blah, amazing. Value it’s hours of video, I synthesize it into a two hour talk where I walk business owners how to through how to do their own PR, how to do their own social media marketing, like talking about that tool with Tweet Deck and other tools for scaling up social media marketing. So I created a two hour or hour and a half to two hour presentation. And then I just basically reached out to organizations and partnered with we work with founders Institute, Startup Grind, startup blink, and a bunch of different co working spaces around the world. And then I basically just went on tour on my own on my own bill. And again, just really focusing on the value I can create. I obviously started where I lived in San Francisco first really focused on getting feedback from people learning about what I’m good and what I’m not good at on public speaking but you just do free events. You don’t really need anybody, you don’t even need a partner. a month or two ago, I did a free I couldn’t get a partner in Tel Aviv until the last minute when I was there, for I was speaking out of university so I wanted another free event. So I just did it at the beach. I literally put it up on Facebook and an event, right it had 15 people come. And I ended up working with a couple of those founders for add reviews and other cheaper, lower funnel, lower ticket price consulting engagements, but like a totally free event because of Facebook and event right and Meetup group meetup. com, you can pretty much promote your events for free. Obviously, as a marketer, I do a little bit of spend on Facebook ads as well, especially if it’s a paid event. But I yeah, I’ve done like 15 events this year, I would say 75% of those were my I created the event myself, then I found partners. And then the more and more events you do, like you said, They’re great content, you put them in your social media, and then stuff starts to come inbound after that. So people hired me to speak to their organization, or hire me to speak at their event series and and so you start out doing it yourself, then you just be like, you know, pay for my travel and that’s enough and then as you move up, you can charge more and more. And even me I mean, I’ve probably done 5030 to 50. And I’m still only like, if it’s if I’m not going to lose the opportunity if they can’t pay me, right if they don’t we’ll cover my travel I really want to speak to the so for me, I’m not it’s not a revenue generator, I just really want to get out there and speak. And then I find like two to 3% of people in the audience end up buying products from me. So it’s it’s

like it’s a when you’re building your portfolio just like you’re getting clients like you say, you spoke at this event and that event, and that helps bigger I say, hey, this guy knows what he’s doing right? Now. That’s probably a whole other topic of discussion we can have is on on building a speaking engagement, base and tour and even mentioned something interesting is like, Don’t even worry about if there’s an event exist, just create one. There’s opportunities through meetup com and all these other places, just create an event and just start inviting people. That’s a that’s we could talk about an hour about that. I actually give complimentary talks, I give talks on on branding and marketing communications, and you give talks on growth hacking, so we probably should combine our forces at some point and have a really, really

Yeah, absolutely. And I have, I have some of my talks recorded as well, so we can share them with your students if we want. One thing I have noticed over the past six months, so I had a talk in South Africa with a organization, and they refuse to let me do a free talk. Normally, my talks are free because I don’t focus on the revenue I generate. It was a really, really high end. founders only invite only co working space in Cape Town, South Africa, and they charged like $10 a person. And I was offended. I didn’t know how to feel. I was like, I want it to be free. And they were like, no trust as we know the market, you’ll get way higher quality attendees. And I was blown away. It was the most engaging audience. The most highest quality in the sense of everybody had a real startup. It wasn’t you know, no offense to the dreamers and everything but if you don’t have and if you’re only at ideas that you might not be able to benefit from the tactics that I’m teaching, so like real founders that had real projects that were out there in the wild, so I’ve learned Reese, you know, if you’re if you are starting an event, charged A minimal a nominal fee, like five to $10 a ticket that it might sound stupid. But you know if I’ve had an IDA free event in Dubai, where we had 500 people come to a 200 person auditorium, and it literally burnt the bridge with the organization because it destroyed they’re like, you know, they had people sitting on desks and yeah, you know, angry and writing and posting bad things on social media about the event space, because I didn’t, I didn’t cap the tickets. I just said, okay, but anyway, I didn’t think all 500 will come anyway. So I think it’s important lesson for me to price it, even five to $10. And then it makes you a little bit of revenue. And that’ll help you get your confidence up. But then you can reinvest that in the paid ads promoting your couldn’t agree with that

more for sure. So tell us, our audience how they can follow you online and learn more about you.

Yeah, so there’s three main things that I do for startups if there’s a startup founder or a business owner or freelancer, that’s listening You’re probably not interested in my high level consulting stuff unless you’ve raised millions of dollars. You can message me then. But for freelancers, I’m definitely interested in coaching or helping them with the business. I do like an hourly coaching thing. You can find me online at Andrew startups.com Andrew startups on Instagram or any other social media. And yeah, just google Andrew startups one word and you’ll find content that I’ve written that I would love to help anybody that’s interested in chatting.

Okay, Andrew startups. I’m a follower and a fan. Thanks so much for joining us. Let’s keep in touch for future talks. Okay.

Definitely might take too much. Take care.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Andrew Lee Miller has spent over 13 years growth hacking startup wins, including 5 years in Dubai and 5 years in Silicon Valley. Since his third exit as Head of Marketing, he’s launched and grown tech projects in over 15 countries, Show Notes: Andrew Lee Miller has spent over 13 years growth hacking startup wins, including 5 years in Dubai and 5 years in Silicon Valley. Since his third exit as Head of Marketing, he’s launched and grown tech projects in over 15 countries, driving traction for over $22,000,000 in funding rounds as a consultant via … An Interview With Andrew Lee Miller – Learn Growth Marketing Read More » Mike Volkin clean 23:57
How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-promote-myself-as-a-freelancer-for-cheap/ Tue, 17 Sep 2019 16:28:25 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3686 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-promote-myself-as-a-freelancer-for-cheap/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-promote-myself-as-a-freelancer-for-cheap/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)? Get your value prop and USP down Ask your f&f for referrals Send cold emails Build your linkedin network, use linked helper Hit social media Write for yourself and post on Medium, share across social media Get some collateral, hit the pavement Guest …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-i-promote-myself-as-a-freelancer-for-cheap/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)?

  • Get your value prop and USP down
  • Ask your f&f for referrals
  • Send cold emails
  • Build your linkedin network, use linked helper
  • Hit social media
  • Write for yourself and post on Medium, share across social media
  • Get some collateral, hit the pavement
  • Guest blogging

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin. And today’s topic is how can I promote myself as a freelancer for cheap. You could spend endless amount of money on Google ads, Facebook, all that stuff to bring in paid traffic. But what we are looking for here is free traffic free prospects free clients ordinarily free. So the first tip I have for you is before you do anything, you got to get your value proposition and your USP down. I’ve talked about USPS on multiple occasions and it’s very important, USP unique selling proposition if you don’t know what it is join Freelancer masterclass, or just google unique selling proposition and try to figure it out on your own. There’s lots of blogs that walk you through it step by step that will allow you to get and keep a prospect interested. The other thing I want you to do probably right off the bat, something I recommend you don’t do in Freelancer masterclass. But I would recommend if you’re just looking for a way to get started, you need something free is just the fnf the friends and family. Okay, reach out to your network, one of the things that I recommend is downloading all your emails that you’ve gotten in the last six months. And you can there’s various programs, you can download emails, depending on what your email client is, but download all your emails and then sort them with a BNC as highest priority sees lowest priority about how frequently you contact them, and then send each of them an email and the reason why I want to sort them by priorities because you can send these emails in bulk and the ones you would send the a group would be a different email than you would send the secret the people you hardly talk to okay. So you want to Three different emails and just copy and paste, and send them to all your friends and family saying that you’re available to work. The other thing is sending cold emails. You know, nobody likes spam, but there’s lots of list brokers out there. And if you have a targeted niche you want to go after cold emails, unfortunately, work. So there’s a lot of people out there that don’t sell an email list for just about anything. In fact, if you type in email list, and then whatever email is trying to get ahold of like email list, insurance adjusters, you’ll get people who will sell you an email list or be able to get you an email list. So just make sure you’re buying one that’s reputable, and that has a return policy and guarantees a certain bounce rate and all that good stuff. The other thing you could do is build your LinkedIn network, you might think well, that’s not going to do much, but there’s a lot of cool tools you can do to help build a very targeted LinkedIn network. One of my favorites is an extension called linked helper. And what you can do is put in very advanced criteria of what you’re looking for and it will automatically friend and message all these Very specific people, you can do job titles, people that work for certain companies in the past or present keyword searches all sorts of stuff. And you can build a very targeted list and then all you do is start prospecting on on LinkedIn and start posting and then opportunities will come your way. Another thing you can do is just hit social media tell people that you’re available start hash tagging, start friending. You know all those typical social media activities. There’s so many social media, quote unquote experts out there, it seems that anybody has a social media account, who wants to call themselves a social media professional, there’s really no criteria to say, Hey, I’m a social media expert. Why? Because you have an Instagram account, I don’t know. But there’s really not much to social media to be honest with you. There are some strategies here and there. But ultimately, there’s an overabundance of social media quote unquote experts who will sell you ebooks and courses on how to do something really. If you want to just get started, get some freelance clients in the door. Just do the basics post a couple times. Hashtag a couple times friend is a few people a day just make it a goal to do a certain amount of things every day and your network will grow. I like to use the analogy. It’s like a rolling snowball downhill, right? You’ll put in a lot of effort to get that snowball formed at first, and you won’t see anything in return. But as you roll that snowball down the hill, it starts to pick up steam are you doing very little in the snow is starting to accumulate on its own all of a sudden you have this big snowball and you don’t you’re not even doing anything. You know, gravity is taking effect. So in this case, social media is like that, where you’re going to do a lot of work up front you’re going to feel like you’re shouting in an empty room. But after a while every single post you know, once you have 2000 followers you’re going to see seem like it’s getting hit by a lot of people, which is true. Something else you can do to promote yourself as a freelancer is right for yourself and then post on any number of sites that allow you to post blogs like medium calm is a very popular one. You can post

answers to questions. I’m Cora qu o ra com the largest question answer site on the planet. So if you just write for yourself, and then share it across these platforms, you’ll eventually start gaining an audience, you’ll start getting traffic to your website, or wherever you’re trying to drive it to, you probably, if you’re a new freelancer, if you don’t have a website, you can just drop it right to a social media page. Okay? And then another thing you could do is just get some collateral and hit the pavement. So if you’re someone that maybe markets to local restaurants, get yourself a trifle brochure, or even just as something as simple as an eight and a half by 11. talks about what you do a little bit about how you’re different and how are you going to add value to their establishment and then just walk in the door and ask for the manager asked for the owner, in fact, to be good if you had the owner, before you walked in, and there’s multiple ways to get the owners information, local business records and whatnot. So you can just if you’re the extrovert type, you can just go into these local places old school style, shake some hands, bleep some collateral and And let it go. That’s the way it’s done. That was the way it’s done in the 60s. And that’s the way it’s still done today. And, you know, that’s still work. So be sure to add that to your prospecting plan if you’re that type of person who would like to do that. And the last tip I have for you is guest blogging. So what I want you to do is go to a site like buzzsumo, calm Bzz Su, Mo calm, search for keywords, pull up some blogs that are of interest to you that you can write about, and then contact the site owner. What’s good about buzz Sumo will tell you who’s writing on those topics and who has these popular blogs. And you could set timeline like popular popular blogs that were shared a lot in the last six months and with this keyword and then us reach out to them and say, Hey, you need some content. I’d love to be a guest blogger for your site. I write on, you know, auto parts or whatever you whatever you want to write on. And those are some great ways to get some cheap or nearly free exposure to promote yourself as a freelance

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)? Get your value prop and USP down Ask your f&f for referrals Send cold emails Build your linkedin network, use linked helper Hit social media Write for yourself and post on Medium, Show Notes: How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)? Get your value prop and USP down Ask your f&f for referrals Send cold emails Build your linkedin network, use linked helper Hit social media Write for yourself and post on Medium, share across social media Get some collateral, hit the pavement Guest … How can I promote myself as a freelancer (for cheap)? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:22
How do I ask for money up front? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-ask-for-money-up-front/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 16:25:30 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3684 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-ask-for-money-up-front/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-ask-for-money-up-front/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How do I ask for money up front? Its all about cash flow and getting clients to pay Know your worth, confident freelancers rarely have issues getting paid up-front Build trust-have a good website, good reputation and good reviews Be open to a deposit to build trust Make payments super easy Offer reassurances …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-ask-for-money-up-front/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How do I ask for money up front?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How do I ask for money up front?

Its all about cash flow and getting clients to pay

  • Know your worth, confident freelancers rarely have issues getting paid up-front
  • Build trust-have a good website, good reputation and good reviews
  • Be open to a deposit to build trust
  • Make payments super easy
  • Offer reassurances
    • Guaranteeing that the project will be completed by agreed upon deadline in writing.
    • Offering money back guarantees or refunds.
    • Frequently communicating with client and providing status updates.
    • Maintaining a professional relationship with the client.
  • Make them an offer they can’t refuse
    • Tell them you’d work for 25% more (or more) if they pay after work is complete.

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Hot Topic alert. Welcome to Freelancer school. Today we’re talking about getting money up front from client. How do you ask for money up front for clients? So many freelancers. Number one, don’t ask so they won’t get in number two, they get screwed by unscrupulous clients. If your work is any less than stellar, people will start negotiating with you after the fact saying that you’re not worth the money or they want a refund or whatnot in all of that can be mitigated if you just get the money up front. So how do we do that? I’m going to walk you through some action items today. And the first tip I want to give you is to know your worth Because confident freelancers rarely have issues getting paid up front. I made it a policy many years ago to not work for a client under any circumstance, unless they wanted to pay up front at least 50%. And now almost all of my clients are at 100% up front, you can be in the same position to if you just know your worth, because competent freelancers who don’t stumble through the quote unquote negotiation process are the ones who sound more short themselves in their value in their service. And clients don’t question confidence. And if they do, they’re the wrong client for you. Another tip for you is to build trust, have a good website, good reputation, good reviews. Sometimes most of the time clients won’t argue if you’re the right fit, and you want to get paid up front. That’s fine. I rarely if ever get pushback on that. But I will tell you that if you build trust by having a good website and good reputation good reviews that only further solidifies, their ability to pay you up front, because they’re doing research on you, they see that you’re a stand up person that you have a history of doing great work for clients. And that just makes it so much easier for them to give you what you’re asking. And then, you know, at the very least, if you run into an issue where somebody doesn’t want to pay up front, make it easy for them to say, listen, how about, we knock out the first milestone or two, you just put in a quick deposit, maybe it’s 10%, or 25% of the overall project. So instead of paying 100%, up front for the entire scope of the project, you do a scope that is only 25% or 10% of the original contract, and you get that small trust that you’re building because you’re doing just a small part of the project. you’re delivering a great, you’re responding to the client great, everything’s the communications fantastic. And then basically, they’ll pay that money up front instead of the whole hundred percent. And then it’s something that you can quickly knock out in a week or less and build that trust then they want to make you know what and 90% of all Or 75% deposit on the second milestone, it will be much less of an issue. Another tip here is to make payments really easy. The harder you make payments, the more clients will doubt you. And your ability to get things done is easy it is to make a payment nowadays with all these sites like PayPal and Venmo. And all these credit card payment companies, it’s really it takes only a few clicks to set up an account. You shouldn’t have to make it difficult for them. I had a freelancer. I spoke about this on a previous podcast, but this Freelancer made it really difficult for me, I hired him. He made it difficult for me to make a payment I had a sign up for this account I’ve never heard of I then had to get my

my payment verified. I had to

take a picture of my ID and then me with the ID. I had to verify my social security number and go through all the security steps. And by the time I was done, I was like this guy’s toast. I finished the process

but I never hired him again.

I had him just do a small job and then I said I don’t want to hire you again if I have to use this company because even making a second payment was difficult. It was more than just entering your credit card number. So I didn’t want to do that I think it was Payoneer or something like that. Whatever the case, make it easy for them. And if there’s a common payment method in their country, for example, in the United States, PayPal is very common, you should just sign up for a PayPal account, if that’s the client is likes to you. So just be open and ask them what they like to use. And obviously, a lot of clients like to use credit cards because they get mileage points. And yes, there is a fee for using credit cards in your end, but build that fee into the cost of your your project. Right. So if a client says I don’t want to do a CH transfers or wire transfers, that’s expensive, and you have to go to the bank to pay $10 out of my account. And then you know, you have to enter all of the routing number and check number it’s hard when for an extra two or 3%. They can just enter their credit card number be done with it. And all you have to do is enter that sheet into your scope of work. All right, easy enough. So here’s a big tip I have for you in terms of how do you ask for money up front is you want to offer reassurances if you take nothing away from this podcast. Remember these two words offer reassurances. So there’s four things you can do. Number one guarantee that the project will be completed by the agreed upon deadline and writing. Number two, offering money back guarantees or refunds. Number three, frequently communicate with the client and provide status updates. That’s a big one. All right, the lack of communication will only kill your prospects for getting future work. Okay, even if you’re doing a great job, and on the flip side of that if you’re over communicating and doing a terrible job, it makes you seem that much better. So put it in your calendar. If you’re bad at communicating, put in your calendar at least once a day to follow up with the client to send them a daily recap of the work you did even if you didn’t do anything. Just say hey, just checking in with you wanted to recap yesterday’s work or something like that. The best consultants the best freelancers the best self employed people that I’ve worked with Will overly communicate with me even if I don’t want to communicate with them every day, they’ll send me an email. That gives me a little warm fuzzy feeling as a client. Okay. And the last tip I have for you for offering reassurances is maintaining a professional relationship with the client. It’s only natural to want to try to be friends with them. But I’m telling you, the more you become quote unquote friends with clients, the more favors you feel like you’re going to want to give them and they’re going to want to get from you. So it’s don’t mistake this for being friendly. But you know, if you had a weekend where you’re playing golf or doing an event with your your kids, I don’t know a birthday party, don’t be sending them pictures unless they asked. Don’t be proactive and trying to be too friendly with them, because that just crosses the line between friend and client. And the last tip I want to give you in terms of asking for money up front is making them an offer they can’t refuse. This one works great for me. If you were to fill up a grocery card, for example of groceries and I were to say now I’m going to give you two options you can pay $90 now, or $100 in an hour, which would you choose? Well, naturally, you would choose the cheaper option, right? Because you have the money, and you know, you need the groceries. Alright, so let’s carry that analogy over to freelancing. If you make an offer to a client and you say, listen, here’s my fee for doing this project. Let’s just say it’s $1,000. Okay? You can say, you can pay me up front, that’s my policy, thousand dollars, gets you everything you need. I’ll start working on it right away, and it’ll be done by this day. Okay, great. Or you can pay me 1200 and $50 50%. down and the other 50% when it’s complete, any reasonable person who has the money is going to pay you the cheaper amount. If you’ve given the value to the client that you can do the job. If you’ve left no doubt in their mind that you can do the job and the desired timeline. You’re relieving their pain points, you’re the solution to their problem. There’s no reason why they would waste 252 In that respect, okay, so make them an offer they can’t refuse. All right, good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How do I ask for money up front? Its all about cash flow and getting clients to pay Know your worth, confident freelancers rarely have issues getting paid up-front Build trust-have a good website, Show Notes: How do I ask for money up front? Its all about cash flow and getting clients to pay Know your worth, confident freelancers rarely have issues getting paid up-front Build trust-have a good website, good reputation and good reviews Be open to a deposit to build trust Make payments super easy Offer reassurances … How do I ask for money up front? Read More » Mike Volkin 8:25
An Interview With Robert Williams Owner of Folyo https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-robert-williams-owner-of-folyo/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 15:08:04 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3734 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-robert-williams-owner-of-folyo/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-robert-williams-owner-of-folyo/feed/ 0 Freelance Graphic Designers Listen Up! Today I interview Robert Williams who owns Folyo, a freelance design RFP site and community that helps over 7,000 freelancers find jobs that empower them to live their best life. They find hundreds of RFPs each month that are remote, fulfilling and high-paying and provide education on how to bid …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-robert-williams-owner-of-folyo/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview With Robert Williams Owner of Folyo</span> Read More »</a></p> Freelance Graphic Designers Listen Up! Today I interview Robert Williams who owns Folyo, a freelance design RFP site and community that helps over 7,000 freelancers find jobs that empower them to live their best life. They find hundreds of RFPs each month that are remote, fulfilling and high-paying and provide education on how to bid on open jobs quickly and effectively. Rob also hosts a podcast called Freelance which is all about how to be effective at independent work.

Robert Williams owns Folyo, a freelance design RFP site and community that helps over 7,000 freelancers find jobs that empower them to live their best life. They find hundreds of RFPs each month that are remote, fulfilling and high-paying and provide education on how to bid on open jobs quickly and effectively. Rob also hosts a podcast called Freelance which is all about how to be effective at independent work.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Thank you for joining me again today. This is Mike Volkin with Freelancer school today I’m joined with a special guest, Robert Williams or is Rob right. Sorry, I just asked you that. Is there Rob?

Yeah. Rob Robert. Robert. Okay.

I’ll call you rob. He runs folio for Leo is or olio is a freelance design, RFP, site and community that helps over 7000 freelancers, find jobs that empower them to live their best life. They find hundreds of rsps each month that are remote, they’re fulfilling in their high paying and they provide education on how to bid on open jobs quickly and effectively. That’s part of what we’re going to talk about today. And he also hosts a podcast one of my favorite freelance podcasts. As you guys know, there’s there’s no shortage of freelance podcasts out there. But Rob hosts one called freelance, which is all about how to be effective at independent work and that that podcast is available pretty much everywhere, right? Google Play iTunes. Yeah, that’s right. All right. I listen to on iTunes. How often is that updated? Is that every week? Was there a particular day?

Yeah, Saturday morning.

Okay. Yeah, Saturday more excellent. I listened to that the gym. It’s one of my my go to podcast. First of all, as a successful freelancer, I have to ask you, how did you get started as a freelancer and get to be a success? You don’t have to tell us all your tricks of how you got to be so successful. But how did you get started? What made you think, okay, I want to be a freelancer.

Yeah, so I basically got started wanting to be a freelancer in college. And I but I didn’t really make the leap until I got fired. From from my full time job, that’s what kind of kind of forced my hand I think. And yeah, that’s when I kind of made the leap and decided, you know what, I’m going to really try to freelance full time. Hmm.

Interesting. So you do you write a lot about freelancing right? on your website, obviously on your podcast, what is your mission for all the content that you create?

My mission is to help independent designers, independent remote workers. Men can basically make a living, make a great living, and to make that easier for them. Yeah, that just goes back to me being a freelancer myself and seeing that it’s, you know, not always as easy as it should be, I think.

Yeah, I mean, it’s unfortunately freelancing as a part time job right. I’d like to see more more full time freelancers because I think it’s the best job in the world. If you can be full time freelancer, but a lot of freelancers, don’t do it right. In one of your blogs on link Then I noticed that you discuss getting clients on LinkedIn and LinkedIn. Obviously, that could be a very powerful platform for freelancers, and a lot of freelancers ignore that aspect of social media. So can you discuss some of your strategies with our freelance audience on marketing on LinkedIn?

Sure. Yeah, I had a whole podcast on this with my friend list and wetherill, who he’s he’s on the sales consultant side, so is not as much of a like a creative designer or anything. But he basically talk walk me through kind of how he uses LinkedIn. And what he does is he was using video quite a bit. Because video is kind of a more effective, I think of getting your attention, usually, especially on something like LinkedIn where you’re seeing things fly by one way I use LinkedIn personally, is to find kind of the RFPs that you mentioned, for my site. So what I’ve found is like LinkedIn suddenly has Kind of blossomed into this place where companies want like go to get the word out for certain things. And yes they have like the job site the job portion of their whatever they’re offering I don’t even know what they call it now it’s like pro search Finder. That’s a combination. Yeah. But uh, but I think it’s like, better used as a as a connection tool like, like you would use Twitter like you would use you know, something more authentic as like a then then just using it as a job search sites. So what I do is I search, I use just those the search window every morning, and I put in an RFP, and I usually do RFP plus a combination of like website redesign or logo design or branding. And, and I’ll, I’ll sort that by like content so it’s no longer no longer like jobs are like, you know, people’s profiles that have RFP in its Now, like companies and people who are posting about RFPs that have kind of that keyword, or basically it’s just basically people saying, Hey, I have this RFP out. And I need I want responses, and they’ll usually link to it. I’ve found LinkedIn has kind of they let you embed now RFPs are like PDFs in touch. Okay? Yeah. So often, it’ll just be like a direct link, you’ll be able to download it right off the site off that post

on folio, is that are your jobs? The RFPs that are are they usually a bigger size and what you would normally see on Upwork

Yeah, definitely. So I think you mentioned at the at the end, your great intro, by the way, and thank you for listening to the podcast. That’s awesome. You mentioned like all the jobs we try to feature on the site are, you know, remote fulfilling and high paying. And so by high paying, usually we’re looking at if it’s like a website redesign just give you a frame of reference It’ll usually be like a floor of like $5,000. Or it’s if it’s a logo redesign, maybe that’s 2000, or just basically trying and we surveyed kind of our customers, we saw kind of what the average price is for these different things. And that’s kind of how we developed like these floors to really help us gauge like, what, what a high paying job really looks like in the market in 2019. Like this, you know, right happening right now. Not not in 2007 or whatever. But yeah, Upwork I would say is probably quite a bit lower than those like floors. So

yeah, I don’t know too many people on a break out pay $2,000 for a logo designer, usually you see, I mean, I’m on my pulse on design. I’m a marketing guy, but usually see stuff around, you know, under 2000, right, at least, like 200 on some of these natural fibers for those $5 gigs, right. How do you How does someone a freelancer listening to this audience? How do they separate themselves from the sea of other freelancers, you have any quick action Tips for them.

Yeah, I mean, there’s one of my one of the things that I like to talk about a lot and kind of write about on my blog is, is positioning.

as a freelancer, I think

positioning is important. And there’s a couple good books on it that I recommend. I didn’t write them, but I’ll give a shout out anyway.

You can do that.

Philip Morgan, he wrote the the positioning manual. Yes. There’s also a new one out by April Dunford which I who I just interviewed on my podcast about it, it’s called obviously awesome. So there’s a couple positioning books, but um, I think yeah, I mean, I think just thinking about like, the context behind the work that you do that alone, I think is enough to kind of differentiate you quite a bit. Most, at least in the design market. Most people are focused on their portfolio and what that usually means is like a screenshot of my work, like Here’s the website that I designed, as opposed to, here’s the problem I solved. And here’s the Yeah, the solution versus the, you know, the the problem. And so thinking about I think that plus the positioning like focusing on that problem, that’s going to be painful to solve, that’s painful for the clients and expensive to solve. And then thinking about your positioning in terms of like, how can you specialize and and try to be like the world’s most leading person on that particular problem. I think that that is a good is a good way to kind of differentiate yourself and somebody who does that awesome. Val Geisler. Val Geisler calm i think is her is it if you want like a great case study on positioning that’s, I think, a great website.

That’s good. I know what else the benefit of branding yourself is you don’t have to compete for the lowest price. The more the better you brand yourself, the less you have to compete at freelance masterclass, we have a 10 step process right for becoming a great freelancer. And we put branding as a second module. And a lot of freelancers ask is why is this I don’t even know how to get clients yet. Like, why am I worried about my branding of myself and I told me, you know, you got to look within yourself first before you understand how to bring in clients if you don’t do it backwards. So you’re going to be falling in that that trap that all the other freelancers fall into. So I

think that’s a smart approach. And often it’s it gets skipped over like you said, because you kind of think that you have to start with like the market or whatever, but it does really start with you and like what you’re passionate about, and people, people love to throw around that the meme of like, don’t follow your passion anymore. Like your, you know, your forget your passion or whatever. But I think it still does it. There’s like, one way or the other. There’s a spectrum right and then and that advice I think might be going too far now where people are just totally ignoring what they care about or what they want to do and what they want to get out of it. Yeah, I think starting from there is a smart.

Absolutely. I think we’re in agreement on that. So in your career, was there a breakthrough in your business that stood out as a as a point in time that kind of helped establish your creativity? I mean, you’ve got a pretty good name out there. You cast a lot of nets you’ve interviewed a lot of important people look, can you give our Freelancer audience if they’re all trying to establish themselves as credible cast a wide net? So what was there a point in time you realize, Hey, you know what this is I’m doing this right or, or maybe a lucky, lucky break. You got at some point what happened?

I’m lucky break. I think one of the real turning points in my business has been taking a course on it was about it was it was I think, billed as like a product building course. But what it really kind of taught me was to look how to kind of look at a market and pull from that like the things that are going to sell. And it’s of course by Amy hoy, but there’s there’s the You know, there’s other courses, there’s the your freelance course, there’s, you know, tons of courses out there, but what what, what really was the turning point for me was like looking at pains that are that people are experiencing and that they’re already paying for. And that’s where I kind of that’s where to focus and that’s where to kind of just try to help in that situation. And so, once I did that,

yeah, understanding understanding the person you’re referring to putting them in your shoes, that type of thing, understand points,

you know, perspective,

instead of just trying to like shout out, be a billboard, you know, and constantly trying to sell yourself I guess that would be that would be a good way to approach it. So interesting.

It just made it made things a lot easier because it wasn’t like Justin Jackson talks about this like trying to create a market or trying to pull your market to your solution. Instead, just kind of giving them what they want and meeting them kind of where they are.

That’s true and listening to them. I can’t tell you how many times when I hire freelancers on up work, I just get the same copy and paste proposal. It’s like, did you even read anything but the title of my job description, typically that I don’t want, I don’t want this, I don’t want that. And they send the same proposal over and over again, if you took 10 seconds, look at the proposal and send me something custom, at least in the first sentence, and you gotta get my attention. I guess it kind of goes that way with everything more than just upward but LinkedIn as well. And I really liked that, that LinkedIn tip you gave with the RFP, that’s interesting. And you have to do that manually going back that you have to do that manually every single every single day. There’s no RSS feed or alert that can give you something like

that. Well, there’s my site, which I post all the RFPs too. Yeah. And there’s there’s a free plan there as well so you can get like a percentage of them and just kind of even even land a gig or two before you you know, pay anything so that there’s there’s that but I’m on the site as well. I have like some tips on like writing emails. specifically to like a job or an RFP situation. And I I appreciate you saying that because I think the tent the whole template thing, I think it paralyzes you almost because you almost you almost refer on rely on it too much. And you think you forget to kind of think for yourself and to just approach it like from a human perspective, like you’re saying, like just kind of, you know, yeah, reply it. Yeah, like

it’s a lazy way. I’m not saying go have a couple bullet points you want to say but, you know, copy and paste a standard boilerplate proposal. That’s the same from job to job and going to get you very far. so lazy man’s ways out, tell me a little bit of moral folio traction you’re getting where else our audience can find you online, all that stuff. So are my audience all your audience can follow you?

Yeah, so yeah, you already mentioned that the podcast I’ve freelance podcasts. I’ve interviewed some really cool people. Based like people at base camp Disney World, see? Yeah, bunch of cool sites why NAB and they basically kind of share what how they’re building their business and how they approach independent work, remote work, which is I think two very important things to master as a freelancer. So yeah, there’s the podcast. And then you mentioned the site folio.me, which is kind of where me where I and my team kind of come find these RFPs and these independent contract jobs for creatives and designers, and we put and we hand screen each one, and we post them on the site. And so we’re trying to be like a lot, a lot different from any other RFP site in a couple ways. Particularly, if you go to like to an RFP site, it kind of sucks because it’s going to be hundred page PDFs from these government entities that like robot spirit. It appears and so there’s no no filtering process. So with with our with this site like this is what my ideal version of a RFP site would look like. Like the RFP is basically come to you to your inbox. We’re hand screening them to make sure that they’re like written by humans. And we get additional information from these people that are wanting these proposals is what it’s mostly like website redesign stuff. Yeah. So that’s, that’s, we have a free newsletter on there that you can sign up for and get started. So that’s probably the best place to go. I think I appreciate you asking me that man.

Yeah, no problem. Are you thinking about expanding out to other industries, marketing, for example would be great.

Yeah, I do want to.

Yeah, I think creative in general, like writing and marketing stuff is on the horizon for us because it is kind of where I’ve grown to really enjoy that work as well and understand that work and so The more I feel like independent businesses that we can help make a better living for themselves and work from home and and because I really love that part of like my business like spend like in the other room my baby’s asleep taking a nap and I can go hang out with her and that’s like what I what I think to cut through all the the marketing or whatever like that’s I think more of the reason why I’m able to kind of keep doing this every day and kind of focus on it because I do I do think it’s like an awesome time to be working so

yeah, yeah, I mean like to say I’m I got a nine week old daughter in the other room that’s also napping and I want to be that’s great man. Me I look forward to more content need to put out remember he’s got a free newsletter on his website. He’s got folio.com right fo fly. Oh, I’m sure you’re very active on LinkedIn. So follow me on LinkedIn anywhere else we can follow you social media. What I’ll see you Facebook, Twitter,

yes Facebook and Twitter also folio on Twitter. It’s yo folio,

yo folio folio.

All right. Well, thanks so much for joining us, Rob. And hope to have you on again as a future guests

yeah anytime and

talk to you soon.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Freelance Graphic Designers Listen Up! Today I interview Robert Williams who owns Folyo, a freelance design RFP site and community that helps over 7,000 freelancers find jobs that empower them to live their best life. Freelance Graphic Designers Listen Up! Today I interview Robert Williams who owns Folyo, a freelance design RFP site and community that helps over 7,000 freelancers find jobs that empower them to live their best life. They find hundreds of RFPs each month that are remote, fulfilling and high-paying and provide education on how to bid … An Interview With Robert Williams Owner of Folyo Read More » Mike Volkin 17:38
How do I determine my freelance rate? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-determine-my-freelance-rate/ Fri, 13 Sep 2019 16:21:05 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3682 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-determine-my-freelance-rate/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-determine-my-freelance-rate/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How do I determine my freelance rate? Start with a yearly goal, then subtract 3 zeros from your yearly goal Determine what you need to cover your business and personal expenses If you have a good niche and brand, don’t worry about your competitors Estimate how much you want to work. There are …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-determine-my-freelance-rate/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How do I determine my freelance rate?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How do I determine my freelance rate?

  • Start with a yearly goal, then subtract 3 zeros from your yearly goal
  • Determine what you need to cover your business and personal expenses
  • If you have a good niche and brand, don’t worry about your competitors
  • Estimate how much you want to work. There are 2,080 work hours in the year
  • Decide if you want to charge hourly or per project
  • Leave a 10% fudge factor

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Welcome to Freelancer school. I seem to always be getting a barrage of questions about my rate. Is it too much? Is it too little? And when I say my rate, I mean the person asking you the question, not my particular rate. To be honest with you, I never actually worry about my rate. Nobody ever questions it anymore. That’s probably because of the way I branded myself. I present myself in the discovery call in the way I only get on the phone with clients. I know I can help as opposed to many freelancers who hop on the phone with anybody who will talk to them. So I want you to make that your goal to bring in into talk To only qualified prospects. But that’s a show for another day. Right now we’re going to be talking about how do I determine my freelance rate. And there are a few things. The first thing I want you to do is start with your yearly goal, and then subtract three zeros from that yearly goal. That’s the simplest way to really determine your rate, leaving all things all of the things unconsidered. Okay, so if you have a yearly goal of $100,000 in income, then I want you to subtract three zeros from that and that is your hourly rate. That should be your hourly rate. So in other words, $100 per hour if you want to make $100,000 a year. That’s a very loose definition, but that is a good starting point to get you close to where you need to be. That’s one of those 8020 things that’ll get you 80% there. Okay. The other thing you can do to determine what your freelance rate is determine what you need to cover in your business and personal impact. finances. So if you have a typical personal credit card of, I don’t know, $3,000 a month, and a business expense credit card of $500 a month, say you’re a new freelancer, you’re not many expenses, what I say 3000 plus 530 $500. So you want to factor that in, if you have a goal of say, you know, $10,000 a month for nice round numbers, but you have 30 $500 expenses, that means your take home will be 60 $500 a month. So when you think about what your income should be and what you should charge as a freelancer, you have to understand what your expenses are. Because if you have abnormally high expenses, which some of you I’ve seen do, you should factor that into what your gross revenue would be or your income in this case. Okay. The third thing I want to mention is if you have a good niche and a brand, you shouldn’t have to worry about your competitor. So many people say well, Mike, I want to charge $100 now But I see a lot of my competitors, which have the same amount of experiences me charging $40 an hour. Okay, well, that’s a pretty big difference. But honestly, if you have a good brand, and you’re targeting a good niche and you have a good experience in that niche, then you shouldn’t have to worry about what other people are charging. That’s why I always tell you to find a good niche and develop a good brand, because over time that pays huge dividends, rather than being that generalist who has to always compete on price. So keep that in mind in terms of like, who your ideal client is, and then what industry you want to work with all that good stuff, develop your own brand, and then you won’t have to worry about any of that stuff. Another tip for you is determine how much you want to work how many hours you know, as a full time freelancer, I always set aside time every day to prospect so if I want to work, quote unquote be at work, even though I don’t feel it’s work. You know, for a typical eight hour day, I want to set aside two or three hours of prospecting. That means I can devote Five or six hours to client work. So if your goal is to make, say $100,000 a year, when you backtrack that amount, and you divide that by your monthly income and then divide that into whatever hours you work, you have to factor in the total amount of hours you want to work in a day or a month and divide that by your daily or monthly income, that would help you determine your hourly rate as well. Okay?

Then you might want to determine if you want to work hourly or per project, this whole hourly discussion we have and what you want to determine your rate to be might be a moot point, if you just want to work per project, you might have a very specific set of skills, you might say, Okay, I designed five page websites for anybody for whatever reason, and this is what I charge and then that’s it. There’s no hourly rate, it’s just whatever you want to charge per project. All the clients are the same. If you have that type of niche where you can do something like that more power to you. per project work certainly has its disadvantages as well. its advantages. So consider our leavers per project. And there are other ways to charge clients as well, which we talked about in Freelancer masterclass, it goes beyond the scope of this podcast. But the last tip I want to leave you for determining your freelance rate is to leave a 10% fudge factor. Unfortunately, crap happens, I don’t want to swear crap happens that’s not a swear word, right. So you know, things will take you longer than expected, maybe clients might call for an extra meeting, that you don’t expect Whatever the case, you always want to leave an extra 10% because chips don’t always fall where they should. Alright, so whatever your rate is, just bump it up 10% that will give you a little bit of cushion room. And also that goes back to the old saying under promise and over deliver. So if you’re telling a client something’s going to cost $3,000, and that’s including that 10% fudge factor, and only winds up being say 20 $700. Then all of a sudden they’re happier because you came in under budget. You’re probably more likely going to get follow up work because of that. Okay, so I hope these tips helped Best of luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How do I determine my freelance rate? Start with a yearly goal, then subtract 3 zeros from your yearly goal Determine what you need to cover your business and personal expenses If you have a good niche and brand, Show Notes: How do I determine my freelance rate? Start with a yearly goal, then subtract 3 zeros from your yearly goal Determine what you need to cover your business and personal expenses If you have a good niche and brand, don’t worry about your competitors Estimate how much you want to work. There are … How do I determine my freelance rate? Read More » Mike Volkin 6:27
How do I get started freelancing? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-get-started-freelancing/ Thu, 12 Sep 2019 16:17:37 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3680 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-get-started-freelancing/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-get-started-freelancing/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How do I get started freelancing? Find a niche Get your marketing communications and brand down Get a couple prospecting channels you feel comfortable with Get some processes down Be laser focused on your goals Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-get-started-freelancing/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How do I get started freelancing?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How do I get started freelancing?

  • Find a niche
  • Get your marketing communications and brand down
  • Get a couple prospecting channels you feel comfortable with
  • Get some processes down
  • Be laser focused on your goals

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Welcome everyone to Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin. And today’s discussion we’re going to be talking about how do I get started freelancing? Well, I might be biased, but I think education is a good way to get started freelancing. But other than that, other than educating yourself and signing up for Freelancer masterclass, which is free and getting started with knowing the realm of freelancing, the first thing you really should do is find a niche and find a skill set. You know, what exactly do you want to do? And in terms of niche I mean, like what kind of clients you want to serve. It doesn’t have to be a particular industry, but it can be a particular subset of an industry. It could be a particular type of clients. It can be the b2c industry or the b2b industry, which is business to consumer and business to business respectively. Although I think you should really get more niche than that, but don’t just think of a niche having to be just an industry okay? In fact that Freelancer masterclass one of our resources we give you as a list of over 400 different niches you can pick, and there are thousands of them. But those are just some some springboards for inspiration. Another thing is get your marketing communications and your brand down. What does that mean? That means you should understand what your USP is your unique selling proposition, that means you should understand what your value proposition is, so many freelancers skip over that and then they become just another Freelancer in the ocean of thousands 10s of thousands, hundreds of thousands of freelancers. So if you develop all those marketing communications early, you will stand out as someone who provides a little bit of a unique value to a particular subset of clients. That you’re pitching to. So don’t skip over that. And if you don’t want to take freelance or masterclass whatever reason where we help you develop your USP and your value prop, just Google and try to do it on your own, you know how to develop a USP how to develop a value prop, it will go so far and making your career successful. Another tip and how to get started freelancing is get a couple prospecting channels you feel comfortable with. There are a lot of ways to bring in clients a lot of ways, but there are some ways that you’ll feel more comfortable than others. You know, some freelancers like to cold call, or like to cold email. That’s not me, but I’ve certainly drum up a lot of business doing that. But you can find prospecting channels that are comfortable to you. Maybe you’re just the type of guy who likes to stay on LinkedIn and network. Maybe you’re the type of person who likes to go to networking events, you know, whatever the case. Another tip to how to get started in freelancing is get your processes down too many freelancers Start just saying, Okay, I’m going to be a freelancer and they get their first client, they don’t know what to do they have no way to

service the client in terms of software or, or tools. And what happens if you scale? What happens if you take on 10 clients, you have the ability to do that. Let me I’m asking you a question to think about, do you have the ability to take on 10 more clients this month? If your answer is No, you are not set up the scale, find software to allow you to do that. I mean, one of my favorites is teamwork, their competitors, Asana, Trello, any kind of project management platform that help you manage clients, it’s great even if you have one client, you can manage all that all that those random thoughts that go in your head or it can all be organized in processes like that. And then how will you accept payment? How will you log clients data and information? How do you care about client security, all that stuff is important. And you have to know about that before you start freelancing or you’re leaving yourself and your clients vulnerable. Okay, and then the last tip I have for you today is to be laser focused on your goals. So often in Freelancer masterclass, we talked about goals. Well, why is that? Well, if you get in your car would know where to drive How do you know you got you get there? How do you know you got there? Well, it’s kind of the same way with making goals you got to treat your business like a business. So is your goal, a revenue or an income goal is at $100,000 a year, for example? Or is it the goal that you want to get two clients a week for the next three weeks? What’s your goal there? Maybe your goal is marketing related. Maybe you want to convert 5% of all the cold emails you plan on sending this month, whatever it is, every month, you should have goals in my calendar. At the end of every month, I have a set aside of time for three hours. And all I do is I make my goals for the next month. It doesn’t have to be income goals. I actually have a couple goals I I try to make but I just I look at the flow of my business. You know what’s what am i what i got currently working on. What’s my capability of taking on new clients? What’s my capability of upselling or cross selling my existing clients? So I make those goals for the upcoming month. That way I know if I’m successful, and you know what the great thing about being successful goal is, is that you have the ability to celebrate, you know, it might be food related. You know, one of my favorite foods is Adams peanut butter fudge rippled from the Cheesecake Factory, okay? It might be the fact that I treat myself to something else. Maybe it’s athletic related, because I love doing athletic related stuff. Maybe it’s fitness related. Maybe it’s a half a day off, you know, whatever the case you feel like you can treat yourself when making goals. And those of you who have been on diets before kind of know what I’m referring to, but goal should be the very foundation for everything in your company. Because we don’t have goals, you’re not able to scale unless it’s by complete fluke or luck. And unless you have goals, you have no reason to get where you’re going and you’re just kind of Putting through day by day without really understanding the value that you deserve that you bring to yourself and to your clients goals help establish all of that. So if you’re looking to get started as a freelancer even if you’re an experienced Freelancer and don’t currently utilize the tips I just talked about, you should really incorporate not just some but all of them because they will change your career. Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How do I get started freelancing? Find a niche Get your marketing communications and brand down Get a couple prospecting channels you feel comfortable with Get some processes down Be laser focused on your goals Raw Transcript Get ready for ... Show Notes: How do I get started freelancing? Find a niche Get your marketing communications and brand down Get a couple prospecting channels you feel comfortable with Get some processes down Be laser focused on your goals Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to … How do I get started freelancing? Read More » Mike Volkin 6:45
How do you find freelance jobs? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-you-find-freelance-jobs/ Wed, 11 Sep 2019 16:13:17 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3678 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-you-find-freelance-jobs/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-you-find-freelance-jobs/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How do you find freelance jobs? Freelance platforms LinkedIn F&F (don’t recommend) Job boards (we work remotely, telecommute/remote keywords) Research local businesses and create openings. —————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-you-find-freelance-jobs/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How do you find freelance jobs?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How do you find freelance jobs?

  • Freelance platforms
  • LinkedIn
  • F&F (don’t recommend)
  • Job boards (we work remotely, telecommute/remote keywords)
  • Research local businesses and create openings.

—————————-
Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

It’s time for freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin. And today’s topic we’re going to be discussing how to find freelance jobs. Many people think freelancing is just about the platforms like Upwork or guru calm or fiber or freelancer. com It’s not the case. There’s lots of ways to find freelancing jobs. And you just have to understand what a freelancer is for as a freelancer, someone who can work for multiple clients at once. I mean, there’s it’s a very loose definition of a term. You can do it on a per project, you can do a long term work with clients But as long as you’re a freelancer and you want to find jobs, you’re going to get something out of this podcast episode. So the first thing, obviously I just mentioned, Freelancer platforms. I mean, if you Google, something like Freelancer platforms, you’ll get some blog posts where people have listed dozens and dozens of platforms. 90% of them are on the following websites. I’m about to say upwork.com, which is the biggest Freelancer com which I don’t recommend very small projects. Usually. They go they’re awarded to people in Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, you know, typically on that platform, you’re lowball you’re getting for the lowball price. Same with fiber calm fibers, where you would find clients who are looking for only the lowest price for certain things. Guru calm is another one. So go ahead and start a profile on all of those and just see what opportunities shake out. Another place to find freelance jobs, probably one of my favorite definitely My top three would be LinkedIn. LinkedIn is huge, but a lot of people don’t understand how to get freelance work out of it. And I always say the very basic tip is just make it a goal of 10 connections a day. That’s it, put it in your calendar if you’re one of those people that live and die by your calendar, but 10 connections a day on LinkedIn will present you with a lot of opportunities after you have a full account full of thousands and thousands of people posting, you’ll be able to see all that all that stuff in their feed, and opportunities will be presented to you fnf what’s called friends and family I do not recommend working for friends and family but I can understand if you’re a beginner and you’re looking for some work or you’re in a dry spell you want to go to friends and family we talked about not doing friends and family work at Freelancer masterclass but, you know, be that as it may it doesn’t make my lesson on how you can find freelance jobs if you’re the type of person that doesn’t mind Mixing business with pleasure then tapping into your network. One of the great things that I’ve done in the past before I stopped working for friends and family is I downloaded, there’s various programs that can do this downloaded all of my emails within the last six months. There’s some export services for that, and I use Gmail. You can export all of your emails and then delete everything except for the email addresses. And then Dee doop, so now you have a list of a unique list of everybody who’s emailed you in the last six months. And then I made a column right next to that to the email addresses and I just labeled it a DNC, a are people that are the highest priority that I talked to often be is my secondary priority, and see are the tertiary priority, the ones that I the one offs, the ones that I barely talked to, or, or didn’t respond to, you know, just got one or two emails from now from that your age will be where you’re going to get your freelance work from, okay, so you want to just make sure you hit all of your A’s tell them that you’re available for Some work and something will probably shake out. I was in real estate for many years. And one of the things that real estate agents do is they tap into their existing network because that’s where 80% of their businesses going to come from every single year is friends and family because if you have a large network, you’re going to get some get some referrals, people who will recommend their friends and family or their neighbors to you. Okay.

job boards. That’s another place people think that job boards are just for finding salary jobs, that is not the case at all. You can go to we work remotely.com that’s one of my faves to find people who are specifically looking for remote work. But here’s another one of my favorites go to indeed calm, which is really a great, it’s almost like a job board aggregator. And then you could type in certain keywords you’re looking for. So what you want to do under the location, instead of typing in a city, you want to type in the word remote. And then you’re going to get anybody who lists the word remote and set up an alert for that. Another thing you can do on indeed calm is put in the word telecommute. That’s a far less common but that is also something you can put in. It doesn’t just have to be in a location. You can put it in any one of the fields like there’s a there’s a keywords to search for field. There’s one that’s excluded, you don’t want to put it in that field with keywords that are excluded. But if you put the word remote, sometimes you’re going to get incorrect results you’ll get a job description says we do not consider remote candidates or you will be working with remote teams. That doesn’t necessarily mean the position itself is remote. Okay? So keep that in mind and D calm. And the last tip I have for you is to research local businesses and just create openings. I’ve done this before on several occasions. It’s actually quite fun. When you have a niche. You know what service you can provide. You go to the businesses that you can provide those services for And just email the owner or talk to the manager. I know somebody specifically who does is exclusively for their freelance work. They do marketing for restaurants. So they go around to all the restaurants in the area, and he has his services packages. So the services package runner, so what he does is he goes to restaurants he needs to the owner, and he presents them with three options. And each option has a different level of service of marketing that he does. You know, there’s like an SEO package and there’s a Paper Paper click package and there’s a marketing collateral package and a website package and whatnot. And you know, as they the packages, increasing complexity, they do so in price, but you can do that create openings for yourself, just in your local community. You can be a local expert, just by creating openings for for local businesses. So I hope these tips help jog some ideas and hey, if you already use it, utilizing one or two of these ideas, use a couple that might have resonated with you that take you a little bit outside of your comfort zone you might be surprised what you find. Okay.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How do you find freelance jobs? Freelance platforms LinkedIn F&F (don’t recommend) Job boards (we work remotely, telecommute/remote keywords) Research local businesses and create openings. —————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing... Show Notes: How do you find freelance jobs? Freelance platforms LinkedIn F&F (don’t recommend) Job boards (we work remotely, telecommute/remote keywords) Research local businesses and create openings. —————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing … How do you find freelance jobs? Read More » Mike Volkin 7:26
Interview with Reuben Swartz Owner of Mimiran – How to sell without selling https://freelancermasterclass.com/interview-with-reuben-swartz-owner-of-mimiran-how-to-sell-without-selling/ Wed, 11 Sep 2019 14:47:42 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3729 https://freelancermasterclass.com/interview-with-reuben-swartz-owner-of-mimiran-how-to-sell-without-selling/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/interview-with-reuben-swartz-owner-of-mimiran-how-to-sell-without-selling/feed/ 0 Show Notes Reuben Swartz is the founder of Mimiran (pronounced “MEHMehran”, or like “mimosa”), the CRM for people who love serving clients but hate “selling”– it’s the tool he wishes he’d had when he was consulting and was frustrated trying to sell with traditional CRMs. He’s also the host of the Sales for Nerds podcast. …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/interview-with-reuben-swartz-owner-of-mimiran-how-to-sell-without-selling/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Interview with Reuben Swartz Owner of Mimiran – How to sell without selling</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Reuben Swartz is the founder of Mimiran (pronounced “MEHMehran”, or like “mimosa”), the CRM for people who love serving clients but hate “selling”– it’s the tool he wishes he’d had when he was consulting and was frustrated trying to sell with traditional CRMs. He’s also the host of the Sales for Nerds podcast. He has a computer science degree, and the transition to having to handle sales and marketing was really, really hard (but it didn’t have to be).

-How can a freelancer close a prospect without having to feel like they’re selling?

-What are your favorite methods of prospecting as a freelancer?

-I often talk about making it as easy as possible for your clients to sign with you. I see Mimiran offers esignatures, what else do you recommend to make signing with a freelancer as easy as possible?

-Tell me about why you created Mimiran?

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success. Brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor, Mike Volkin. Everyone. Thank you for joining me. This is Mike

Volkin. Today we’re joined with Ruben sports, the founder of Nimrod. Did I pronounce that right?

Yes. Remember it,

memorized the CRM for people who love certain clients, but hate selling. We’ll talk a little bit about that actually. It’s the tool he wishes he had when he was consulting and was frustrated trying to sell a traditional CRM. He’s also the host of sales for nerds podcast. I love that podcast. He has computer science degree and is transitioning to have handles the sales and marketing was, I’m sorry, let me say that again. He is in the transition to having to handle sales and marketing was really hard, but it didn’t have to be that way. So he realized that and I want to talk to him a little bit. What about Freelancer and sales? Because not all freelancers are salesmen. Welcome to the show, by the way. Thanks for having me, Mike. I’m love your podcast. I am a frequent listener. And I have to mention that off the bat

is it updated the podcast so there are certain days

you know, it’s supposed to be I started doing it twice a month I could not keep up with that. So I started doing monthly and this month I’m late because my editor is on vacation and so I’m feeling bad because there isn’t an episode released in August but there really should be usually like the last Thursday of the month. Okay. The podcast

is called sales for nerds. Now when I get to the gym, I go to gym every day and I have my my podcast I listened to instead of like, you know singsong saying something so I listen to podcasts, and always check like when when your podcast is updated, but I try to get a pattern and I can’t quite figure that out. So now that I know, I know there’s not a pattern. So

the world there’s supposed to be a pattern and I’m totally screwing it up which is really not good.

Okay, but Anyway, I encourage all our followers, so listen to sales for nerds podcast, let’s start off talking about how a freelancer can close a prospect without having to feel like they’re selling. This is a big sticking point, because as you know, freelancers are writers, they’re marketers, they’re not all sellers. And when they get on a phone with a prospect, or even in person, they have to feel like they’re selling and they just don’t like that. So can you tell us how a freelancer can can sell without selling?

Sure. And this is something that I struggled with for years because I knew I had to quote unquote, sell and I hated it. And I think something that helped me figure out this different way to frame it is we all like to buy things, but we hate being sold. There’s a lot of sales experiences that we’ve probably had that didn’t feel like a sales experience. They felt like someone awesome was helping us solve a problem that we had. And then there’s a bunch of crappy sales experiences we had where somebody was trying to sell us and was really about making themselves the hero instead of us. And so for me, the big switch was I’m not actually going to try to sell somebody, I’m going to try to help them. Because as a consultant, that’s what I do. That’s what I enjoy doing. That’s what I’m good at. That’s what feels natural to me. If I’m trying to sell them, I’ve tried I bought all these sales books, and I tried to follow all these, quote unquote best practices. Yeah, they were really more for like, you know, you’re the new Junior sales rep at IBM kind of thing. Not. I’m just somebody trying to help a client. But I think if you can position it as I’m just here to help you, what do you need to do? Let me really try to understand your problem, what you’re trying to do, so that I can get you the solution you need. And it might involve me, it might involve me sending you to someone else. It might involve me telling you Hey, you know what, you actually have bigger fish to fry right now. Don’t even worry about this.

Right? It’s not the right time. Yeah. One of the things I like to do to prevent the feeling that I’m selling is I like to prepare in advance a list of questions because if I’m the one dominating a conversation, and I’m the one asking questions, I’m the one That is dictating the answers and how the questions are going to go not them. And you know, prospects are all going to have similar questions like, tell me about yourself, and why are you the best fit for this job, you know, then you’re going to feel like you’re selling, as opposed to if you’re asking the questions and you’re able to put in your answers to how you would be a best fit for the job that allows you to kind of set the tone, you know, so that’s one of my tips. along the lines of selling, what are your favorite methods for prospecting? as a freelancer getting those prospects on the phone or in person? Do you have favorite marketing methods that you like to use?

Absolutely. And this is something that again, I struggled with tremendously and unnecessarily but taking that same philosophy of I’m not here to sell. I’m not here to prospect I’m here to help. I think the biggest thing that people miss is that there’s a set of people that they already know, your friends, your colleagues, folks you’ve worked on with past projects, people in your community and you don’t necessarily have to pick up the phone and try to sell them. But just stay in contact with them, make sure they know what you’re doing. And try to help them make connections for them be a helpful part of the community. And it’s not. It’s not entirely predictable. Like I’m going to make this many phone calls. And a week later, I’m going to have so many projects, but over time you build up that karmic capital, that social capital, and people are going to be referring business to you. They’re going to pick up the phone and call you when they have a problem that that is up your alley. So make sure you’re doing that. And also, one thing that was surprising for me as an introvert is my life’s actually better because I’m actually spending more time having conversations with people. So that’s, that’s step number one, right? If the people that you know don’t even know what you’re doing, make sure they know and do it with a phone call. Don’t just send them an email. Secondly, I think sort of along the lines of the transition from selling to helping, I sort of made a transition from marketing to teaching. So marketing and selling its kind Like all about us, and we’re awesome. Helping and teaching is really about the other person. So if you’re a freelance writer, offer tips on how to write better if you’re a freelance developer, offer tips on, you know how to test your iOS app or whatever it is that you really focus on, almost like you’re putting yourself out of a job. That seems a little counterintuitive. But you’re basically helping the people that you are most eager to help who are going to see the most value in your help, and positioning yourself as an expert to them. So offer something on your website offer offer articles content, and then have a lead magnet that will convert somebody from a visitor to a lead if they are interested in going deeper into whatever your area of expertise is. But the whole philosophy here is I’m here to help you. I’m here to teach you not that I’m doing a ton of prospecting and marketing, at least for me, and for I think, a set of us who just don’t feel comfortable with that kind of aggressive sales and marketing approach.

Yeah, you know, most financial Don’t do content content is king so it also in addition to all the great stuff you just mentioned, it also puts you in a in a better position automatically than anyone else they’re interviewing absolute automatically seen as the expert and can solve their problems. I often talking about making it as easy as possible for your clients assignment here. I noticed member on has office e signatures which I love. What else do you recommend to make signing with a freelancer or make signing with a prospect as easy as possible, other than just a signature? Is there any other any other tactics that you’ve used to kind of ease a prospect into signing and becoming a client?

Sure. And full disclosure, my app started out as proposal automation, because that was the part that was driving me nuts as a consultant. Everyone would say, Oh, yeah, we’re ready to get started and then things would kind of disappear and it just kind of drove me crazy. So in addition to automating the process, I think the real key is our Are you capturing the right stuff in the proposal? Because sometimes you go and you have these great conversations and they say, Great, send me a proposal. And then if you send them something that doesn’t reflect the conversation, it’s just basically a marketing brochure. And that’s when you you kind of get the client going dead or saying, gosh, I don’t really understand this, I’m going to go with someone else. So I say a proposal is a story, not a brochure. And the hero of the story is the buyer, not the seller. So we want to be able to basically recapitulate the conversations we had maybe the whiteboard diagrams, we drew together, the solution that we collaborated to create in a really easy to understand story that shows the customer having their problem, how you help them overcome it and the awesome results they get. And it shouldn’t be a surprise, it should be almost entirely focused on them. I like to show a little slide with, you know, Luke, and our two and threepio. Meeting Obi Wan, and it’s like, well, who’s the hero of the story. And when I started out, probably because I picked up a bunch of bad habits like a lot of us do. I thought I was the hero of the story. I thought I was Luke Skywalker like going to save the galaxy. But really, where the old man helping the hero of the story, our guidance is crucial for them getting where they need to go. But we are not the actual hero. So they should be able to pick this up, read it, nod their head, yep, yep, yep. And I’ve done this, right, just sat in the room and just sat there silently while I read through the proposal. And you will kind of want to get that nodding, feeling and even the terms and conditions, right, you want to have your lawyer make sure that you’re protected, but it should be human readable in so they can just go through spend five minutes, 10 minutes reading the proposal. So yep, that’s what we need to do and sign it and be done. Let’s make it easy.

So you’re actually on the phone or in the room while the prospect is reading through the proposal.

Ideally, yes, that is not always possible. But even though I’m all about electronic proposals, I want to be sitting in the room with someone if possible. Right, you just have a richer interaction, then if you’re on the phone, or especially if they’re just reading it and you’re not around.

Absolutely, I actually recommend that in my master class, we talked about that. I’ve actually tested that before I’ve done 10 proposals where I just emailed it off. And I’ve done 10 proposals where I, the first time I’ve seen is when they’re on the phone with me on the zoom, zoom, call, zoom, calm. And the conversion was about 30, a little bit more than 30% higher if I was on the call with them. Awesome. It’s great if you have on the call. And I started thinking why that was, well, you can, when they’re reading a proposal, by nature, people are defensive, right? So they want to have objections to what you’re saying you don’t have a reason not to hire you. When they are, no matter how much they like you. That’s just by nature what they want. So when you’re on the phone with them, you’re talking them through anything that doesn’t make sense. You’re overcoming any objections right away. And by the end of the call, it’s super personable, and and it’s and they understand everything completely. So when you’re ready to go by that time, so you remember, it sounds awesome. You tell me a little bit more about it. an attraction you’ve gotten and how long you guys been around.

Yeah, sure. And what it’s funny, you know, you talk about this, when you’re talking to somebody about a proposal and they’re in the room together. The thing I like about the combination of electronic proposals and in person or over the phone live discussion is the proposal is sometimes there is a question and you’re like, Oh, you know, I didn’t make that as clear as I should have. What do you think that should say, okay, make sure it says by next Thursday, or whatever it is, and then you just make the change right there and they have it so you don’t have to waste time going through another iteration.

Exactly. Makes your template that much better, too, because you see what people skip over and what they what they focus on and all that stuff. So Exactly.

You know, I actually started member in as a consultancy, as a freelance consultancy and then I ended up hiring people and did that the whole thing and, and eventually, I needed to just stop traveling. And so I tried to do it without traveling, which wasn’t necessary. I mean, it was, you know, there were some some good parts to that, definitely. But there’s also certain things that I couldn’t just take on. If I wasn’t willing to get on a plane a bunch here, so I ended up developing software because I thought, you know, I like to think that I’ve learned a lot of lessons along this path, how can I encapsulate those in a tool so that I can help other people without necessarily selling? And sorry, without without getting on a plane and traveling? Yeah. One of the things I noticed I tended to work with fortune 500 type companies. But in between, if I could, I would work with much smaller businesses more like my own business. And I actually thought that was a lot more fun. It didn’t pay as much money, but it was you could make a change, and people would act on it instead of, you know, with a big company, half the stuff that you recommend is still sitting in a PowerPoint gathering dust a year later. So true. And that’s just the nature of it. Right? There’s not one that’s right or wrong, but I really like that feeling like I was going to have an immediate impact on a business owner. And so the proposal automation piece came out of the desire to know really, when is someone reading my proposal, right? Because it’s one thing if we go And we discuss it. But then especially with these bigger clients, it was always like, okay, now we have to go discuss with our team and blah, blah, blah, blah. And we’d have some follow up meeting scheduled and that would get rescheduled. And before you know it, it was like, I’m, like that dorky guy saying, hey, just wondering if you got my proposal you have any questions and, and wondering if, if it’s helping or hurting for me to leave another voicemail bothering them or

Yeah, right.

And like, I should at least be able to know if they’re reading it, because especially when I had people on payrolls, like, do I need to keep them billing over here? Because this isn’t going to close for a month anyway? Or do they need to actually be in New York on Monday, because that’s what the client originally said they wanted and it was just like, it all kind of came back to I can’t magically make someone sign but at least if I knew if they were reading my proposal, I’d have some notion of where we are in the process. And I might be able to pick up the phone and have a conversation. So it’s all about timing. Yeah, yeah. That’s how it started. And then some of my early customers started saying okay, this is great. proposals are now not the bottleneck in my in my business, what can you do to get me more leads, and I never intended to build any functionality for that I thought I would refer them to some plugins for WordPress or some other technologies. And I realized that even though there’s tons of tools out there for lead generation, they’re either aimed at ecommerce businesses, or they’re aimed at larger companies that have a big sales team. They’re not really aimed at freelancers or consultants, where the people doing all the work are also doing the sales and marketing. And so they’re not as effective as they could be because they’re expecting someone to be on the phone eight hours a day, or they’re expecting that everything can be done with drip automation. And so I wanted a way to get folks like consultants and freelancers or lawyers, people who are really spending their time with clients, not just get them a lead, but get them conversations because they need that to actually turn somebody into a client. So there’s some stuff that never and does a little differently than traditional CRM to get you from Web visitor to a lead to a conversation. And then automating some of the stuff we talked about earlier, like, well, how often do you stay in touch with people? I had a lot of trouble with that. And I was talking to my customers, all small business owners, we were all struggling with customers, you’re so busy day to day trying to do our work, close our deals, and then hopefully have a little bit of a life in our quote unquote, spare time. It’s very hard to make that extra time just to keep those relationships alive. How do we actually build that into our schedule in a way that doesn’t overwhelm us? And so I got frustrated with I was at the time integrating memory and with with a more traditional CRM, and I was like, this is just too hard. I don’t, I can’t. There’s too much cognitive stress. Why don’t I just make it easy to do this stuff that’s actually really important for my business in my life. And so that kind of squared the circle on calling it a CRM, and it really is a CRM for people who hate selling, right? It’s like yeah, I don’t Want to go sell someone but I want to go help people.

I immediately identified with it when I saw it. It sounds like you’re addressing one of the weak points that freelancers have for bringing in clients. And it’s such a great idea. I wish you the best best of success as you continue on with that. Can you tell me a little bit about where our audience can find them are on and and where they can follow you online?

Sure, you can find memory in at EMI EMI ra n.com. You can find me at Rubin at memory. com or you can also check out sales for nerds.io or find me on Twitter or LinkedIn. And yeah, thanks so much for having me. I hope this is helpful. I think the big thing for me is so many of the struggles I had with sales and marketing as a freelancer were my own mental barriers that I had erected for myself. They were not actually things that should have held me back and my mission now kind of like yours is Mike is to help folks who are in that position realized that they don’t have to be held back by these barriers.

Yeah, you’re not the only one that was struggling. That Teachers struggle with those problems and you’re creating a solution for I love it. Thanks so much for joining me the answers you gave were very compelling. Very nice, Mike.

Thanks so much. Take care. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes Reuben Swartz is the founder of Mimiran (pronounced “MEHMehran”, or like “mimosa”), the CRM for people who love serving clients but hate “selling”– it’s the tool he wishes he’d had when he was consulting and was frustrated trying to sell wit... Show Notes Reuben Swartz is the founder of Mimiran (pronounced “MEHMehran”, or like “mimosa”), the CRM for people who love serving clients but hate “selling”– it’s the tool he wishes he’d had when he was consulting and was frustrated trying to sell with traditional CRMs. He’s also the host of the Sales for Nerds podcast. … Interview with Reuben Swartz Owner of Mimiran – How to sell without selling Read More » Mike Volkin 17:29
How to make a great freelancing website https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-a-great-freelancing-website/ Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:06:25 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3676 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-a-great-freelancing-website/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-a-great-freelancing-website/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How to make a great freelancing website Why have one? On brand- what are you communicating to the world? Show your authority It brings in clients but also displays your reputation Important components: simplicity -Be brief with effective sentences clarity- Who are you, what do you do, how can you help me? value-is …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-a-great-freelancing-website/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to make a great freelancing website</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How to make a great freelancing website

  • Why have one?
  • On brand- what are you communicating to the world?
  • Show your authority
  • It brings in clients but also displays your reputation
  • Important components:
    • simplicity -Be brief with effective sentences
    • clarity- Who are you, what do you do, how can you help me?
    • value-is this person worth the money
  • Platforms:
    • com
    • WordPress
    • Squarespace

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to freelancers school. I am your instructor and host, Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass. Today, we’re going to be talking about the best freelancing websites. We’re going to talk about how to create a great freelancing website, and then what platforms you should publish the websites on. So let’s go ahead and get started. First of all, why have a website many freelancers don’t have websites? Why should you have one? Well, in today’s world, people Google you are being you. So if you don’t have a website, you are invisible to them and you’re leaving their doubts up to their imagination. So people always think negatively, err on the side of caution. Let’s just say that if you don’t have a website, they will more likely go to someone who does have one. Okay, so what goes on your website? Well, the first thing you want to consider is your brand. What kind of brand Do you want to exude? What are you communicating to the world? And you have to define that and the best way to do that is through your personality. Are you person who is more silly or more scientific or more serious, that should exude through your website. And when I talk about brand, I don’t just mean the text, I mean, images and layout and everything that comes together all the images and graphics to create a brand. That’s what you’re communicating to the world. When someone lands in your website. They want to be able to essentially see your personality and who you are. So think about your brand and what kind of brand Do you want to exude? And then I also want you to show your authority, you know, why should someone hire you and we’re going to be talking Talking about individual components in just a minute on what shows your authority. But in terms of what goes on your website, I want you to think about how to display your reputation. I mean, a website is important not only because it shows your expertise, but it also shows your reputation out there. It shows you It shows the client rather, testimonials and industries you’ve worked in. In clients, you’ve worked with all that good stuff that someone who’s looking at your website will want to see to validate your experience and your reputation. So let’s talk about some of the important components of what should be on your website. three main things to keep in mind number one, simplicity, number two, clarity and number three values. So let’s go through those. The first simplicity, Be brief with effective sentences. I can’t stress this enough and I even as I’m considering myself as a marketing communication specialist, and even I someone who can centers themselves, a Marketing Communications Specialist will hire someone, a copywriter, for example, to look for errors, grammar, or spelling or otherwise, and then also look to see if something can be stated more effectively. And always they find something no matter how many times, no matter how many times I look at a particular paragraph of text, somebody can always come in and make it better. So think about simplicity, because most of the time, people are going to spend less than a minute on your site, if you’re lucky, they’ll spend more than a minute but you want to get them with brief, effective sentences. And the second thing I mentioned was clarity. You know, you want to stay exactly who you are and what you’re doing, what you do, and how you can help a prospect. On many occasions, I’ll look at a freelancers website and not know exactly who they are and what their experiences are even what industry they serve in. So you really have to be clear on who you are, what you do, and how can you Help me your homepage should have all that information. And then lastly, think about value. Because this person’s going to be reading, subconsciously your website thinking, is this person worth the money? And your graphics or images? Are they fuzzy? Are they small? Is it unprofessional? I’ve seen graphic designer websites from freelancers that look terrible. Now, if I’m considering hiring you for graphic design job, and your website looks bad, then I don’t think you’re going to do a good job for me because you can’t create graphics for yourself. Why would you create graphics for me? Good. Alright, so really think about simplicity, clarity and value. So now once you have all your texts written down in a Word document time to to design this and put this online but you might think, Mike, I’m not a web developer. Where do I publish this information? Well, there’s lots of different options and taken away the fact that you Got a web developer, you can hand code something. There’s lots of cool options out there, drag and drop. You probably seen commercials for GoDaddy there there one option. Everybody knows about WordPress, it does require a number of plugins if you want to really bring in all your features together. One of my favorites is a site called newbie, a company called newbie and UBI calm really easy, you just you login, you create your account, the user face user interface is really simple. You just drag and drop a few things and you got yourself a website. You know, a lot of people come to me with you know, web com or GoDaddy those are okay, SEO value is a little rough their search engine optimization being found online. Some people may disagree with me on that but I know for a fact it’s not really that powerful SEO wise. So I like newbie for that reason. It’s pretty powerful to be found online and also it’s easy to create a website WordPress every knows about them. They do require a little bit more work a little bit more specialty But if you get a good theme and you get a couple good plugins together, you can scrape together a really nice looking website. My agency website and my freelancing website are both built, built on WordPress platforms. That’s Mike Volkin calm and 800 Lb marketing. com. Squarespace is also a popular one some of my freelancers. In the master class, use Squarespace. I personally only use it once or twice, so I can’t attest to the results and how powerful it is. But I do know that they’re pretty happy with it. I do know though, if you’re selling something on Squarespace, it’s to get a little bit more complicated as compared to some of the other sites out there. But so I would recommend newbie, calm and UBI calm. I’d recommend WordPress and I’d recommend Squarespace. There are others though. So this that is not a complete list. So if you’re talking about building a freelancing website and what components go in it and why you need it, I hope these tips helped. Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How to make a great freelancing website Why have one? On brand- what are you communicating to the world? Show your authority It brings in clients but also displays your reputation Important components: simplicity -Be brief with effective se... Show Notes: How to make a great freelancing website Why have one? On brand- what are you communicating to the world? Show your authority It brings in clients but also displays your reputation Important components: simplicity -Be brief with effective sentences clarity- Who are you, what do you do, how can you help me? value-is … How to make a great freelancing website Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:22
An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-mania-mavridou-how-to-be-a-successful-creative-freelancer/ Tue, 10 Sep 2019 14:36:33 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3725 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-mania-mavridou-how-to-be-a-successful-creative-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-mania-mavridou-how-to-be-a-successful-creative-freelancer/feed/ 0 Show Notes An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer [Sorry about the sound quality here folks!] Mania Mavridou is an Architect & Color Consultant, Owner of DesignMania, the Architectural Studio where design meets psychology to create spaces for people to live and work in happily. In 2014 she founded …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-mania-mavridou-how-to-be-a-successful-creative-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer

[Sorry about the sound quality here folks!]

Mania Mavridou is an Architect & Color Consultant, Owner of DesignMania, the Architectural Studio where design meets psychology to create spaces for people to live and work in happily.

In 2014 she founded Designing for Happiness, the 1st Greek blog (and one of the very few worldwide) about Interior Design Psychology.

Having a rich experience in teaching Architectural Drawing and CAD, she now gives lectures and seminars on Interior Design Psychology, Color Psychology, and Visual Marketing.

In 2016 she started writing for Millo, a top American blog for creative freelancers and had been the content curator of The Freelance Report.

In 2019 she founded The Successful Blog, which helps creative freelancers follow their dreams and build a successful business.Creative Freelancers pain points

Today we will be talking about the pain points for creative freelancers’, based on Mania’s experience as an architect.

What’s the goal or dream for creative freelancers?

Attracting the ideal clients who’ll fall in love with them and their work and will pay them what they deserve! Having to deal with dream clients who’ll trust them and will give them the freedom to create, letting them be in charge of the project.

What’s their biggest misconception?

They think that being talented and doing a great job is all they need to make their dreams come true.

When freelancers decide to go out on their own, what reality hits them first?

Once they’re out there, in the hyper-competitive market, they’ll soon get disappointed. There are so many gifted creative freelancers, doing the same things, even better than them. It’s hard to get noticed, stand out and attract qualified clients. It’s even more difficult to get paid for their work and have a decent income.

What do they think the problem is?

They’re trying to figure out what they’re doing wrong, but they’re looking in the wrong direction. They think they must become better at what they’re doing, be it design, writing, photo shooting, web development, etc. They keep on honing their skills and being jealous of those who’ve made it, wondering what’s their secret. But this is just a (tiny) part of the problem. Some of them will never find out what the real problem is!

What is the real problem?

They cannot communicate their value, because they weren’t taught how to do it. Especially creative freelancers don’t feel well ‘selling’ their services or work. They haven’t learned how to run their own business. That means positioning themselves, branding and marketing their business, negotiating their rates, building trust and communicating with clients, contracting, setting boundaries and being in charge of the project, packaging and upselling their services, etc.

What’s the solution to their problem?

They must change their entire way of thinking. They must switch from being their clients’ employees to business owners and experts in their niche. They must learn how to position themselves and market their business to stand out from the competition. Only a few will turn from semi-amateur guys (no title) who accomplish tasks and struggle with low budget clients, to sought after and well-paid professionals and experts in their niche.

What’s keeping them from achieving those goals and succeed?

A false mindset and lack of the right guidance. They hear about building self-confidence and communicating their value, but those are just words in their ears. They don’t realize there’s a lot of strategy behind success and they usually don’t know where to find help.

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Alright everybody thank you for joining me Mike Volkin here lead instructor Freelancer masterclass and host of Freelancer school Today we have with us. avani is a she’s a business coach for freelancers, by the way, and she’s on a mission to help service based entrepreneurs get more clients, and scale sustainably to six figures. And beyond six figures. avani runs her own UX strategy consultancy. It’s called avani mariola strategy and design. I might have butchered that last name, but you correct me if I’m wrong. Welcome to the show.

Thank you so much, Mike. It is great to be here. And I’m so excited to chat with you today.

Thank you. Did I pronounce your last name right?

You got it?

I actually met I haven’t met her in person but I met avani I first knew about avani through her podcast six figure Freelancer actually have it on my phone because I was listening to what is my now my favorite episode here it’s our It’s right here.

Oh my gosh.

You look at the watch the video. Listen to the video using your mind to multiply your income. It’s a good one as you guys know this people who follow me I’m really big on on using the power of your mind and this it’s a really good episode. I really liked that one. And before we talk about some some tips for freelancers, I think it’s important for our audience to understand your background. Can you tell us a bit more about your corporate tech career?

Yes, absolutely. Well, firstly, thank you so much for listening to the podcast. I loved recording that episode using your mind to multiply your income because I think everything everything thing that we talked about I’m probably going to talk about it a lot today it starts in our mind if we’re running a business if we have a career on to give ourselves a raise whatever it is, so I love talking about that stuff. But before we dive into the details, I’d love to share a little bit about my background and also, you know, kind of how I came into this space as a freelancer. So I actually have a degree in Industrial Design and I discovered very quickly in my career, I discovered this wonderful world of user experience and product design and kind of fell in love with it. It’s such a cool space to be in the technology industry is amazing. To you get to iterate quickly. You get to really dig into and understand users if you’re creating something for consumer facing audience and I just really fell in love with it and I got to work in a couple of different places in Austin. I live in Austin, Texas, and I first started at this midsize company called retail me not and they are online coupons and loved working there. Though I was an in house UX designer, and we did everything we did it all we did qualitative testing, quantitative testing, talking to users and user formal user interviews and getting to work with the product team developers, all of that. So I got this really amazing foundation of what it means to be a designer in the tech industry. And so from there, I made the leap to work at this startup called favor, which is a delivery service here in Texas. It’s similar to Uber Eats, similar to doordash and post mates. And it’s called favor delivery. So favor is where I was the only designer as an in house designer. I was the only person I was like, Okay, I have no one else to like, talk to and, you know, figure out what am I going to do? Or how am I going to do it? So it was like this first experience into figuring things out by myself and being resourceful being super scrappy. We didn’t have the budget we had at my previous company to do formal user testing. So I have $500. How am I going to talk People with $500 like all of these things, right, I got the chance to learn and figure out so after a couple years there, I was like, you know what kind of felt like, you know, maybe you’ve experienced this to Mike. But I felt like I was stagnant. I felt like I had learned what I needed to learn. I was at a point where I felt really good about my skill set. I had the career capital. At this point in all these experiences, I decided that I was going to make a leap, and I wanted to get my time back, I wanted my time to be my time. And so that’s when I started freelancing in UX and product design.

I like it. So that is your niche UX product design for midsize or for small companies, which are

actually so my niche is actually it’s almost it’s twofold. We are a UX and product design agency for consumer facing tech companies. So whether they’re big or small, and we’re also the second part of that is and we’re dialing into this a little bit more We are a UX and probably design agency for consumer facing crypto and blockchain technology company. Oh,

crypto. Okay. Interesting niche. All right. So you had mentioned that you like having the time by yourself or, I guess dictating your own time and how it’s been what is your is that your favorite part of freelancing or is it something else?

Oh, man, I don’t know. I love I love being able to nap when I want an app. Although to be honest, like there’s so much going on. I don’t have every day. But I get to do it if I want to do it like today. It’s just that feeling of I could have nap today. Yeah. Or I don’t have to ask somebody, you know whether or not I can go on vacation for example. Yeah, just those little things and having the control and freedom and I can dial up my income or dial it down. I can. I can make as much money as I want to make and I really I really believe money is a tool money is a tool for impact. So I love being able to learn how to do that myself and share with other people.

I know that’s great and nothing is is just as much as a benefit. I have a 11 week old baby at home and I know I need to never nap and now it’s a part of my daily routine, right?

Sounds awesome.

So, given our audience of freelancers, and in your specialty of teaching freelancers, how to make six figures and more, can you leave our audience today with some tips on how to increase their Freelancer income, say $25,000 or more next year that that’s their goal for 2020? What advice would you give anyone out there listening to increase their income 25 grand?

Well, first, I would say to double it.

I know I know.

Okay, but I will I won’t be in that the too aggressive about it. So let’s say that is your goal. Let’s say 25,000 is your goal. I think the thing you have to realize as a freelancer is your most important thing. tivity is business development. Our goal, our goal here, as Freelancer is we’re to get new clients, we’re only going to make money when we have new clients joining our client roster. So that means that needs to be the number one task you do every single day without fail. And this is this is what I know works. This is what I know works for us to get clients and increase income because if I’m not getting a client, I’m simply, you know, I have returning revenue, and maybe that’ll increase it’s possible for it to increase. But I think the number one way to increase your income is to get new clients and of course know how to price yourself that I would say is the second piece to this. So So what I recommend is actually having a schedule in your day to day where you actually blocked out one hour and I would recommend it’s the first hour of your day to be your money making activities. And this is usually its business Development tasks is, you know, writing contracts, having phone calls with potential clients it is. It is figuring out, you know, what is the timeline for this project that you’re trying to land or figuring out? Who is the next set of people that you’re going to talk to to be your clients? Right? Those are your money making activities, and those needs to be the first thing you do every single day that you show up for your freelance business. Yes, if you do that one thing 25 K is going to be a breeze and it’s just the skills will come I think the number one thing to know is the consistency. If you do something every day all the time and you’re continuing to do it, you’re going to naturally start to improve things you’re going to realize like last time, you talked to this client, you said, X, Y and Z and they’re like, oh, no way. We can’t work with you. You’re going to tweak that the next time you know, you’re a smart person, you’re going to be able to figure that out. Yep. I think if you focus in on the consistency, making money, making tasks, your priority, every single day, just start. Start with q4, start with this quarter. We have three months to do this, I bet you can make 25 k before the end of the year if you do it so

yeah, yeah, that’s a great tip I have, I always say in my master class, put it in your calendar and live and die by your calendar because you know, it’s not. It’s difficult because marketing isn’t quantitative and the fact like you can’t see it like you mentioned going doing it every single day I think of it. like going to the gym every day you’ll you’ll see yourself lose weight, you’ll see yourself build more muscle. It’s something you can see and feel proud of. But with marketing, it’s kind of like invisible until you start getting those clients. And then something magical happens when you start getting those clients your marketing like oh my God, this really works. I’m going to I’m going to go crazy and just do this. And then if it doesn’t become an issue, but a lot of people like they’ll start a YouTube channel or start posting on LinkedIn and they’re like, it’s they’re shouting into an empty room. Nobody’s responding to them. Nobody’s watching the videos and they just kind of feel like it’s it’s not worth it, but you got to stick with it for a little bit and Angela, it’ll pay off in the end.

Yeah, sure. Yeah. Absolutely,

we’re both a testament to that. Right? So tell me a little bit about the client magnet roadmap, it seems very interesting to me.

Yes. So the client magnet roadmap is what I’ve been using in my business. It’s essentially the framework that I use in order to have a steady flow of clients coming in. And it’s, it’s simply a set of systems, I would say that you can put in place and they’re really simple. You know, some one of the systems is, you know, being able to schedule in your calendar that you’re reaching out to a certain number of people per week. Yeah. And being able to find a way to demonstrate value for a potential client without you know, going and doing a project for them. I’m doing too much work like we don’t want to do unpaid work, but a simple way to demonstrate value so that they have to say yes, to work with you. So I kind of am breaking these down and giving you a framework Exactly how you can have the steady flow coming in essentially become a client magnet. So it’s a free roadmap that anyone can grab online. If they go to my website of any mariela.com slash free. Put that

in the show notes. Yes.

Yes, ABA and I am I er ay y la.com. Slash free. If you sound on my name, you could figure it out.

Sounds like it’s spelled so yeah, just yeah. Sounds complicated, but it’s really not so. But yeah, so that’s a force is free. And that’s, it’s like an What is it? Like an eight week guide? or How long does it take the complete roadmap?

It’s, so it’s actually a few pages, the quick roadmap and what what it gives you is the steps these are the steps you need to do. But if you’re really interested, like if you’re actually serious about taking this next level and applying it at the end of the roadmap, I give you a link to join a free class that I have, and it’s an ongoing class that I do, which then goes into details like the strategy Jeez, and the things that you can actually take action on based on the roadmap itself. If I want to know more, if you’re serious and you want that 25 k extra, this quarter or in 2020, you grab that you read it, and then you can go ahead and follow the next steps because I want and and the little free class that I give, it’s all actionable steps, you should be able to walk away know exactly what you’re going to do next.

I love it. I don’t like giving advice unless it’s something actionable that they can walk away with. Other than that, it’s just just talk right? So yeah, yeah, that’s why I asked you on because I know you’re full of actionable tips based on your podcast. So how can our audience follow you online? Tell us a little bit more about about where we can get get a hold of you.

That’s a great question. Well, one you can hang out with me over on the six figure Freelancer podcast. I just recorded some really amusing episodes yesterday. And yeah, and it’s all it’s all about, like things that I’m learning in my day to day as I’m running a freelance business, all of these things are connected and

I So what’s the rotation for that? By the way? Is it like every Monday and Wednesday? Or how often do you

Yeah. You got it every Monday, Wednesday, or sorry, every Monday and Thursday. Okay, close close. Yeah. And so that’s one place and then the second place you must hang out with me is on Instagram stories because I’m there all the time. I love hanging out over there chatting with you on the direct messages and I’m always on Instagram stories you can just go to Ave Maria Allah and follow me if you just probably search my first name, you’ll be able to find me and that’s where I share what’s happening the day to day any tips that I like, come up with like today, I found this amazing feature on like, not a feature. It’s an Easter egg and Asana and I freaked out about it and I shared it on so No kidding. Yeah, apparently if you hit Tab be you will get cats on your screen like overlaid on your screen. It’s totally random.

That’s cool, but random. I love that kind of stuff. Yeah, it’s like the secret menu at at In and Out Burger. Calif burger totally

totally we have we have one of those at towards these tacos here.

Oh you do okay cool. I love the secret menus. So I’ll definitely have to follow Freelancer masterclass will be your latest follow on Instagram. That’s great. We got your podcast, you got your your client magnet roadmap, you got a lot of stuff going on. So I’ll let you go do your own thing. And thank you so much for joining us. Let’s keep in touch. Let’s do some more of these. Okay,

I would love it. Thanks. All right. Thank you talk to you soon.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer [Sorry about the sound quality here folks!] Mania Mavridou is an Architect & Color Consultant, Owner of DesignMania, the Architectural Studio where design meets ps... Show Notes An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer [Sorry about the sound quality here folks!] Mania Mavridou is an Architect & Color Consultant, Owner of DesignMania, the Architectural Studio where design meets psychology to create spaces for people to live and work in happily. In 2014 she founded … An interview with Mania Mavridou – How to be a successful creative freelancer Read More » Mike Volkin 15:51
How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-stick-to-a-regular-schedule-as-a-freelancer/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 16:02:24 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3674 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-stick-to-a-regular-schedule-as-a-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-stick-to-a-regular-schedule-as-a-freelancer/feed/ 0 Show Notes: How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer Live and die by your calendar Always schedule for “makeup” time Don’t feel guilty taking time to do what you love during “normal” office hours. Find your optimal time of day and your optimal work threshold (length) Don’t panic when things go wrong …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-stick-to-a-regular-schedule-as-a-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer

  • Live and die by your calendar
  • Always schedule for “makeup” time
  • Don’t feel guilty taking time to do what you love during “normal” office hours.
  • Find your optimal time of day and your optimal work threshold (length)
  • Don’t panic when things go wrong

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success.

Brought to you by Freelancer masterclass

calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Oh yeah, it’s time for freelancers school. Thank you for joining me. I’m Mike Volkin. And today we’re going to be discussing a question that I got from a student’s freelancer, magic class student. And the question is, as someone who works from home as a freelancer, do you struggle to stick with a regular schedule? And I thought this was an interesting question, because I personally don’t but I did when I first got started. In fact, it was about five to six years into freelancing that I determined how to really make myself efficient. So let me show you some tips on how to stick to a regular schedule. The first tip is to live and die by your calendar. This is probably the most impact Tip I will give you today, if you don’t live and die by your calendar then you should definitely do. So now I’m not talking about put bathroom breaks in your account, you don’t have to be that adamant about it. And I’m not talking about those people who are going to dismiss this tip because they already use a calendar. I’m talking about making the calendar your guide to your day that is unbreakable. For example. on my calendar every day is meditation twice a day, for 10 to 15 minutes a day. Every day on my calendar is the gym every day. And if it’s not on my calendar, making me productive, it gets put on some kind of task list where I’ll take care of it in the evenings or the weekends. But my time during the week days, I live and die by the most productive tasks that I need to make the income that I want. Even on the weekends. It’s not so much productive tasks on the weekends, anything that I don’t see as being productive or making me money I throw into the weekends, but still even on the weekends I will live and die by my calendar. Okay. The second tip I have for you is always skip For makeup time every single day on my calendar I have a half an hour set aside for so I’ve heard some people call it oopsie time some people call it a fudge time I just call it makeup time this is time that you didn’t anticipate would happen I’m a client call ran long. You did work improperly in your client asked you to do it again. This just happened yesterday I had an issue with a client accounts got hacked one of their Amazon accounts so they had to bring me and some other staff members aboard to try to do some damage mitigation control. Okay, so there are unexpected things like that that will creep into your day that you need to schedule for it’ll throw off the rest of your day. So at least a half an hour, I would suggest. Another tip I have for sticking to a regular schedule is is to not feel guilty taking time to do what you love during normal office hours. So that’s the reason why you’re a freelancer because of freedom. Okay, I used to feel super guilty going to play golf or you know, I’m in You listen to me, I’m a competitive tennis player. So I play almost every day, okay, I’m either practicing or I have a match. And I used to feel really guilty if it was like 10am and I’m practicing tennis when everybody else is in their khakis and colored shirts or even worse, their suits on 100 hundred degree days sitting in a cubicle answering phones, I mean, everybody has a choice and how they want to structure the structure their life, and it’s no excuse if you need to get dressed up in a suit every day and answer phones in a in a cubicle. It’s there’s nothing wrong with that if that’s what you like to do, but I don’t want to hear you complain about it. I had a chef the other day complained to me that well, I have to sit in a kitchen all day or stand in the kitchen all day. It’s 150 degrees in there and like what did you choose that occupation? Well, yeah, okay, well, don’t complain about it. I mean, the point here is, don’t feel guilty because you’re a freelancer and you have the freedom to do what you want. If you want to go out for a jog in the middle of the day. If you want to go play tennis or golf or go bowling, do whatever your passion is for life. You structured your life around it. My God reap the benefits of being a freelancer, okay, you don’t have to sit in a home office all day when it’s beautiful outside, I structure my day. So I get some hours done some work hours done in the evening. Okay? So don’t feel guilty. Find your optimal time of day and your optimal work threshold is another tip. So optimal time of day. I know I’m an early bird type of guy, right? So you’ve heard me mentioned this before, if you follow me, I talked about how I usually wake up somewhere between 430 and 630. So by the time it’s 930, and 10, and so people are just getting to the office and drinking their coffee. I’m thinking about lunch at that point, pretty much so that’s what I know my day is optimal. I can just wake up I crank out some work. The clients, prospect calls aren’t happening yet. It’s too early for them, even on the East Coast, and I’m on the on the west coast. So I am an early bird type of person. That’s when my brain functions optimally. And it’s interesting. You know, everybody’s different on this. So I want you to if you don’t know what it is, think about when You did your most productive work today and log it down on a piece of paper on the side of your computer. Don’t do it digitally or you’ll lose it and then do that for the next week and you probably see a pattern going Okay, you know what between two and 6pm is when I’m really cranking out some work. Alright, so that’s the time you want to set aside in your calendar because now you live and die by your calendar is to crank out client work because you can keep your head down and just just work. Okay? So find your optimal time of day and I also mentioned your optimal work threshold which is your length. I am personally not designed with my add not designed to work an eight to five I just cannot do it. I have lapses in concentration. The way I work is I’m very intense for about an hour and a half to two hours at a time and then I like to take a break. I go for a quick jog. I take my dog for a walk or throw a frisbee whether take my daughter somewhere or whatever the case, but I know that in order for me to be productive, I can go hard for about an hour and a half or two hours and then I cut it off okay. It is actually way more more productive to do something like that, than to try to stretch out an eight or nine hour work day consistently, trying to keep your head down and do work, you’re going to hate your life and your brain and your stress and your body just won’t be able to, to handle it long term like that. And you start to resent your life, your job and everyone around, you can feel the effects of that. So you really want to hang back on that and really think about your work threshold. And the way you can do that is to the same exercise is figuring out your optimal work time, is just think about how long you just had a good bout of concentration for you could just say, Oh, I just worked really hard for like 45 minutes, I didn’t check my email. My phone didn’t ring. I just got three pages as a blog done or whatever the case and just start noting what patterns emerge. Okay. And the last tip I have for you in order to determine how to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer, it’s a don’t panic when things go wrong. You know, sometimes you just get off schedule, it just happens and if you live and die by your calendar, and it’s 2pm and you have to Three things that are flagging, you’re behind on two calls and you know what, it’s not the end of the world. You’re a freelancer so you have the ability to a 24 hour work day, you know, on some cases, people get sent home at 5pm and, and they just don’t have access to the same tools that they need to be productive, you know, other their software is at work or whatever tools they need to make calls or be productive is is at work. So you as a freelancer can always make up time. That’s why I suggested earlier to schedule a what’s called a makeup time, fudge time, oopsie time whatever you want to call it, okay, so don’t panic. as a freelancer, you have way more flexibility to make up for lost time than you would as a salaried employee worker somewhere. So I hope these tips help Have a great day.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer Live and die by your calendar Always schedule for “makeup” time Don’t feel guilty taking time to do what you love during “normal” office hours. Show Notes: How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer Live and die by your calendar Always schedule for “makeup” time Don’t feel guilty taking time to do what you love during “normal” office hours. Find your optimal time of day and your optimal work threshold (length) Don’t panic when things go wrong … How to stick to a regular schedule as a freelancer Read More » Mike Volkin clean 8:05
Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-i-turn-my-freelance-work-into-an-agency/ Fri, 06 Sep 2019 15:56:10 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3672 https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-i-turn-my-freelance-work-into-an-agency/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-i-turn-my-freelance-work-into-an-agency/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? If you want to do selling instead of work If you want to learn how to abide by employment law If you really like processes and organization If you want to find bigger clients ————————————————————————————————————————————————— Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/should-i-turn-my-freelance-work-into-an-agency/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Should I turn my freelance work into an agency?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Should I turn my freelance work into an agency?

  • If you want to do selling instead of work
  • If you want to learn how to abide by employment law
  • If you really like processes and organization
  • If you want to find bigger clients

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin, lead instructor Freelancer masterclass. And in today’s episode, we are answering the question Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? I had a freelancer the other day and this is probably the sixth or seventh time it does happen. I had them tell me that they want to be in they want to start an agency and I asked him how much freelance work they experience they had and they said nothing. I’m not a freelancer. I just would like to jump right into being in an agency and I in so many words told him that that was kind of ridiculous. You need to not to be a freelancer first before you develop an agency. But what I would suggest is if you really want Understand how to turn turn freelance work into an agency, get your freelance experience and then you have to think about four main problem points at agencies usually encounter that free freelance work doesn’t so much encumber. So you may, you may encounter some of it in freelance work, but not all of it. So let’s go ahead and go through these four points. First of all, when considering if you should turn your freelance work into an agency, you want to consider if you like the selling part of being a freelancer, do you like sending out bids and quotes? Do you like responding to job poses? Do you like prospecting? Do you like discovery calls? Because if you own an agency that will be 90% here job. I remember when I made the switch over to my agency 800 pound marketing. I felt that I was more of a I felt that I just bought myself a sales job. Very little marketing work. You know, my passion is marketing, but now I’m in the business Making sure clients came through the door and stayed longer. Because I now have a staff to support. So you have to consider that if you like to sell because if you don’t like to sell, then you’ve got a problem. Because even if you hire you might think well, I’ll just hire sales staff Well, you know, honestly, young agency that’s just getting started. You are the sales rep. There’s You are the one that can bring in the clients. It’s your experience that does that you can’t really have an outside sales rep do that for you. Technically, you can, but it’d be very ineffective, at least for a while. The second point I want to bring up is do you want to learn how to abide by employment law and all those other things that go along with carrying employed employees. Now you might think, well, Mike, I could just have an agency and just have it filled with independent contractors. Well, technically, it depends on what state you’re in because in my state, California that is next to impossible to do. In California, we have 21 points of checkpoints that determine If contractors and employee in New York is even worse, actually, but California I mean, if you give them as little as a process to manage something like teamwork, we talked about teamwork, a project management management platform. If you give them something to log into a log their work, they’re considered employee, if you give them an email address with your company name, if they’re considered an employee, I mean there, there’s things you have to really be Be careful of. And I’m telling you that the fines associated with being caught treating someone as employee but paying them as a contractor is not worth not worth it at all. Okay? The profit margin for an agency is about 60 to 40 to 60%, which means that, you know, as a freelancer you could be making a lot more than that. So your profit margin will go down, but as an agent, I’m sorry, but as an agency, you should be bringing in bigger clients. So you want to consider if you want to turn your freelance work in agency, you might be recording Hiring yourself to take on bigger the clients that we normally do. Okay, that’s another little tip. Do you really like processes in organization? That’s another question I want you to ask yourself. If you want to turn your freelance work into agency, your agency has to run like a machine with freelance work, you can be a little disorganized, to be honest. I mean, you could take client and you could do a little bit of work here and there, you collect a check, or, you know, take a credit card payment whenever you feel like it. But honestly, as an agency, you have to have a structure and a process for everything, document everything, log everything. If you’re late with invoices, your clients will pay late if at all. And to be honest with you in terms of processes and organization, if you fall behind or don’t have good processes in organization, you are open to lawsuits, and a lot of liability. So if you are in love with processes and organization and by all means and agency might be the way to go. And in fact if you’re in love with processes organization and selling an agency might be your strong suit suit.

And the last thing I want to give you is something we just touched upon recently is if you want to find bear clients, it’s really hard to find to run an agency with small client with small paying clients month to month, if you want to run it in the US it is. Now you might think, Well, I know an SEO agency in India that charges a monthly retainer $500 and and they take on clients for $500 a month and why can’t die. Yeah, that’s that’s called economy of scale that that won’t work in the US. Really, for me in living in California. Having anywhere from three to six people my agency, I would say that the minimum contract that’s even worth your time taking on a $3,000 a month. Doesn’t really matter what industry you’re in in that regard. So if think that if you can’t take on a multiple $3,000 month contracts at once, then it’s it’s really not worth in processing, training a clot your employees on the call And having the meeting setting up the reports all that stuff. I mean, that’s really just like a breakeven point just to keep the agency of flow is $3,000 a month per client. So consider that so if you’re considering turning your freelance work in agency, I hope these tips help. Thanks very much.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? If you want to do selling instead of work If you want to learn how to abide by employment law If you really like processes and organization If you want to find bigger clients —————————————————... Show Notes: Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? If you want to do selling instead of work If you want to learn how to abide by employment law If you really like processes and organization If you want to find bigger clients ————————————————————————————————————————————————— Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and … Should I turn my freelance work into an agency? Read More » Mike Volkin 6:36
What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-easy-ways-to-earn-money-via-freelance-work/ Thu, 05 Sep 2019 15:52:26 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3670 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-easy-ways-to-earn-money-via-freelance-work/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-easy-ways-to-earn-money-via-freelance-work/feed/ 0 Show Notes: What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work? Data entry Translation Transcription Pet care/house care Blog commenting Voice over artist VA proofreading ————————————————————————————————————————————————— Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-easy-ways-to-earn-money-via-freelance-work/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work?

  • Data entry
  • Translation
  • Transcription
  • Pet care/house care
  • Blog commenting
  • Voice over artist
  • VA
  • proofreading

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Today we’re going to be talking about the easiest freelancing jobs beginners can do. Now I’ve listened to top eight that I could think of. Okay, let’s get going. The first thing I want to talk about is data entry. Anyone can do it. I mean, it’s literally if you have fingers and a keyboard, you can do data entry. So that might be a great starter job for you if you have little to no experience transcription that is taking something of audio and turning it into the written written word. So again, if you have fingers and can type, you can listen to the audio and put it down on paper. I’m sorry, put it down on on Microsoft Word and type away If that is something that you want to do, that is something easy enough. I personally don’t like to do that I don’t like to listen to something and try to type. But some people love doing it and they make good living doing it. Translation if you know another language, by all means there are lots of companies out there that need translation services, everything from government entities to businesses to individuals. So if you like to translate between one language and another, especially written or verbal, you there’s lots of work for you out there. Pet Care healthcare, obviously there’s an onset of new websites like care.com, wag calm all those places you can find work as a freelancer to do various types of pet care and house care. Now granted, if you want to do pet care and even house care, there are certain things that you will learn and pick up as as you get experienced, but there’s no reason why if you’ve had a pet and care for pet in the past that you can’t do it for others. blog commenting. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of people out there that will pay to have fake blog comments on their blog or other people’s blogs to try to gain notoriety. Right now, it’s still popular. I know Google’s trying to combat that those fake blogs. But be that as it may, right now, it’s an easy entry level job to do it and pay that much. But hey, if somebody wants to pay you to do some blog comments, and you can come up with either some comments of your own, or they’ll give you comments to post on under your account on your behalf and you feel comfortable doing that, go ahead and do that. Voiceover artists if you have a lovely voice, unlike me, and can speak at a normal tone and at a normal, even keeled and by all means being a voiceover artist, is very lucrative in some cases. I know some voiceover artists on fire that charge over $100 an hour, just to say a few few sentences. So every everybody needs a voiceover artist that that’s in business at one point. Others were some kind of video or audio. They’re trying to create a professional one at least Especially car salesman, you know, Sunday, Sunday, Sunday inventory, clearance sales, stuff like that, you know, that sounded pretty good. Maybe I’ll be a voiceover artist. But anyway, there are a lot of voiceover artists, artists on fiber, fi ve RR so go ahead and check them out. Upwork also has them but fiber sees most be the most popular platform for that. Va also called a virtual assistant. So those are people who are ready and able to work with anybody on any particular task, virtually. So you can work out of your house and somebody you might have 10 clients and at any given time, they might email you or call you and say I need this done or that done. It could be anything could be data entry could be transcription, it could be they’ll teach you how to do something and you do it. Usually it’s mundane tasks. But I have three or four virtual assistants based on what type of information I needed the time usually it’s web research that I have people do for me so organized Using spreadsheets or creating spreadsheet so if you like the kind of stuff by all means Microsoft Office if you have skills Microsoft Office virtual system, maybe a good job for you. And the last one here proofreading if you are the type of person that likes attention to detail if you’re a reader, what you can do is proofread people’s blogs. Lot of people have ghost books, Ghost books ghost written for them, you can proofread those you can proofread manuals and transcripts and all sorts of great stuff. So if you have a good attention to detail and you like to read, proofreading could be a great entry level job for you. Okay, I hope you enjoyed these tips. And if you are new to freelancing and haven’t quite found how you want to make your money or what your niches then go ahead and get started with one of these just to get some of that revenue coming in. Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelance

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work? Data entry Translation Transcription Pet care/house care Blog commenting Voice over artist VA proofreading ————————————————————————————————————————————————— Raw Transcript Get ready ... Show Notes: What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work? Data entry Translation Transcription Pet care/house care Blog commenting Voice over artist VA proofreading ————————————————————————————————————————————————— Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing … What are some easy ways to earn money via freelance work? Read More » Mike Volkin 5:09
What planning is essential for freelance work? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-planning-is-essential-for-freelance-work/ Wed, 04 Sep 2019 15:45:16 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3668 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-planning-is-essential-for-freelance-work/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-planning-is-essential-for-freelance-work/feed/ 0 Show Notes: What planning is essential for freelance work? Website Overcoming objections Understand your value, what pain points do you solve Understand money management Understand communication parameters —————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-planning-is-essential-for-freelance-work/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What planning is essential for freelance work?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

What planning is essential for freelance work?

  • Website
  • Overcoming objections
  • Understand your value, what pain points do you solve
  • Understand money management
  • Understand communication parameters

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

What planning is essential for freelance work many freelancers just kind of jump in the freelancing game and don’t do the necessary foundational work to set themselves up for success. So I’m going to share with you, Oh, I’d say five or six tips that will really get you on the right track. And this will apply even if you are an experienced freelancer. Maybe you haven’t done a couple of these, and some of these will help you scale faster. This is a unique podcast for me because this is the first time I’m doing a podcast with my newborn child on my lap so you might hear some I don’t know crying, hopefully laughing moaning I don’t know what’s going on. What sounds are going to emit from her? But I She is currently napping, so we’ll see how this goes. Okay, so what planning is essential for freelance work? First of all, you need a website, a lot of freelancers try to skip over that fact and think that they don’t need one. But honestly, if you want to be a full time freelancer, a website is necessary a freelancer masterclass. We give a whole class on what you need on a website and how it’s supposed to flow and be designed and whatnot. But there are lots of easy ways nowadays to drag and drop a website together and just an hour or less. So get yourself a good picture, get a couple paragraphs of your work history and a little bit of understanding a little bit of a brand and story you want to tell them put a website together. Okay, that’s very important, because prospects will be googling you to check out more of what they don’t know about you. Okay? And your website should be should be coming up when they Google you. Another thing too The plan for when doing freelance work is to overcome objections. I can’t tell you how many times I get the same question over and over again from prospects looking to hire me, and I have that memorized now, but questions like, you know, what do you charge? And why and what, what is your experience with this? Or what is your experience with that? come up with some common answers to these questions that you might ask, be asked, and if you don’t know what they are getting a few discovery calls with clients, and then write down some of the most common recurrent questions you get, okay? And then that way, now that they’re written down, you don’t have to stumble through them. I find that I don’t, I used to write them in paragraph form and just read the answers. But I found that that sound a little unnatural. So what I have now is just bullet points and I just make sure that I’ll answer the question reading off the bullet points. Okay. It’s sounds a little bit more natural that way. Okay, so what other planning is essential for freelance work? Number one, I’m sorry, number three, understand your value. What pain points do you solve? Exactly? A lot of freelancers don’t really know that they might think, okay, I do freelance writing. I do SEO work I do design, but what exactly is your value? What do you provide? That solves a pain point? Yes, clients will need design work done. But what exactly do they need? Do they need design work done that will convert website traffic better? Do they need design work that will increase their brand awareness? So start to think of what pain points do you solve but not necessarily what you do, but what pain points do you solve for your clients? That would really help you in your discovery call when trying to close a client? Actually, when trying to close a prospect, okay. For those of you who don’t know the definition of prospect is someone who hasn’t hired you yet.

And a client is someone you currently are working with.

Another tip here about what planning is essential for freelance work is understand money management. I can’t tell you how many times between January April, freelancers, email me, call me, text me freaking out, they have all these taxes do that they never planned for. So I’ll tell you exactly what I do. At the end of every week, I total up all my incoming funds, all my revenue, and I put 35% away in a separate account and I don’t touch it. Okay, that might seem like, I don’t know, next to impossible for many of you to do. But I’m telling you, it’s good business practice, because you won’t get that money back if you draw it out. So let’s say you make $10,000 in a month, hopefully you do. And then you have to put the put away 30 $500 of that money. Don’t think well, I’m short I cash this month. I’m just going to use some money from that 30 530 $500 and I’ll pay it back next month. It’s not going to happen. Okay. And you’re going to have a problem come tax time. Because you’re gonna need to pay Uncle Sam or whatever country you’re in your your income, portions of your income. Okay. And my last tip I have for you is understand your communication parameters. This is very important prospects will actually I should say clients will run you ragged, texting you emailing you Skyping you what’s happening you any means necessary to get ahold of you smoke signals, whatever they have to do Morse code. If they want to get ahold of you, they will find a way but you have to make it clear before they hire you. This is the way I communicate. I tell my clients this, you can reach me by phone if you make an appointment. And they respect that because I tell them that if I don’t have a scheduled call, I’m doing client work, and it might be your work. So please don’t interrupt me. And then I say I respond to emails three times a day, morning, noon and evening right before I log off for the day. So if you are the type of person respond to emails right away, your prospects or clients are going to take advantage of that. As soon as you stop emailing them back within two minutes or 10 minutes what they’re used to, you’re going to start to become a bad Freelancer to them because you’re not responding like you’re used to you set that standard. I don’t, I don’t want to give you this analogy, because I don’t think you’re a dog by any chance. But you know how training dogs is like, if they sit all the time, every time on command, and then they stop sitting. You, you see them as someone who’s being disobedient, right? Because they they make they might sit one every three times or, or they might miss a couple times when you say it. And they’re not performing up to the standard. It’s kind of like that for freelancers. So if you give your clients a standard that you’re going to respond to every two minutes, and then all of a sudden you start responding every hour, even though that’s still a fast response time. It’s substandard to what they expect of you. So you have to understand your communication parameters and make it clear to your prospects before they hire you How you like to communicate. I hope these tips helped Best of luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: What planning is essential for freelance work? Website Overcoming objections Understand your value, what pain points do you solve Understand money management Understand communication parameters ——————————————————————————————————————————————... Show Notes: What planning is essential for freelance work? Website Overcoming objections Understand your value, what pain points do you solve Understand money management Understand communication parameters —————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing … What planning is essential for freelance work? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:26
What should I look for when hiring freelancers? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-should-i-look-for-when-hiring-freelancers/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 14:52:23 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3665 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-should-i-look-for-when-hiring-freelancers/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-should-i-look-for-when-hiring-freelancers/feed/ 0 Show Notes: What should I look for when hiring freelancers? Reviews Google them Specific work, not so much in your industry, but the type of work you need done. So not just SEO, ecommerce SEO is more specific What’s their background? Do they have experience with SMB? Enterprise level clients? Can they deliver in the …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-should-i-look-for-when-hiring-freelancers/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What should I look for when hiring freelancers?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

What should I look for when hiring freelancers?

  • Reviews
  • Google them
  • Specific work, not so much in your industry, but the type of work you need done. So not just SEO, ecommerce SEO is more specific
  • What’s their background? Do they have experience with SMB? Enterprise level clients?
  • Can they deliver in the timeline you want? How busy are they?
  • Are they doing the work themselves or outsourcing it?
  • Will they agree to internal processes or do they require you to use their tools?
  • How do they like to communicate (i.e. Skype, phone, email, etc?)

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Yay, it’s freelancers school time and today we are going to be discussing something a little different today. Usually we discuss items about finding clients or getting work as a freelancer or making your life more efficient as a freelancer. But today we’re going to be discussing what should I look for when hiring a freelancer? Undoubtedly, as you begin to scale and grow your company, you will need to work with other freelancers. And your ability to find quality freelancers that can work with you and melt with your personality will make or break your success as you scale. So let’s go ahead and talk about hiring freelancers properly from someone who does it dozens and dozens of times a year, that would be me. By the way, if you don’t know and this is your first time listening to our podcast, I am Mike Volkin, the lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass, I probably should have led with that. But hey, I’m so excited to dive into the topic of what should I look for when hiring freelancers. So let’s go ahead and do that. Number one, the most obvious is look at their reviews. And I’m not talking about these the standard five star review, I’m talking about the review of the particular work that you’re interested in. Here’s a perfect example. I hired a virtual assistant a couple months ago to do some data entry work. And all the reviews looked fantastic, except he had about three or four, two and three star reviews. And they were all related to data entry. I couldn’t find any five star reviews about that entry. And I don’t know the reason it wasn’t difficult work, but for whatever reason, he does not do data entry very well. Now upon looking at His Upwork profile, which is where I was hiring this person or thinking about hiring this person, it would appear that he had 60 plus good five star reviews and a couple bad ones that may or may not have impacted the work that I had planned on getting him but in fact it did. So I want you to not only look for reviews, but look for reviews that had work related to what you’re going to be hiring that person for. And also, other than just if you’re not hiring an Upwork I want you to also Google them or big enough, googling them find out what they what their presence is online. I gave an example of one of my earlier podcasts on how I was all set to hire somebody and then I googled them and it turns out they were a big pothead now. I mean, all they did, they had websites posted with forum postings about pot and growing weed and getting high constantly to Facebook posts were all about, you know, weed and, you know, that’s great if that’s your hobby, but from my point of view of somebody hiring you, I need someone more perfect. fessional and that, especially if you’re going to be working with clients from you, that is also going to be doing the same thing, and that is googling you. And if

you’re going to be having an impact on me getting hired

by a client,

if I introduce you as a part of my team, you better have a good reputation out there. Okay. What should I look for when hiring freelancers is what we’re talking about. And another tip I have for you is find specific work not so much in your industry, but find out if they have specific work experience for the work that needs to be done. So for example, if you’re hiring someone that if you’re a marketer, and you want to find someone that does SEO work, you’re not just looking for someone

that does SEO work, you’re looking for someone who

has e commerce experience, SEO work for your e commerce client. All right, so it’s not just writing work. For example, it’s technical writing work for your client who needs instruction manuals written or whatever the case is. So make sure you’re hiring someone that is not just has doesn’t just have a specific skill set that has a specific skill set of the skill set that you’re looking for even more niche. So not just SEO e commerce as you have not just writing technical writing, all right. And then also when hiring freelancers, you want to look into their background, what is their background? Do they have experience with small businesses or enterprise level clients? I made this mistake early on in my career is I hired a couple of freelancers, two at a time, actually. And they were both enterprise level clients, I’m sorry, enterprise level freelancers, meaning they only had enterprise level clients in the past. And I thought that was good because this particular client I was hiring for needed enterprise level sales. Now the problem is the client itself was a small business, small businesses and enterprise level clients are worlds apart and how they do business and both of these freelancers just could not melt well with our work. Small Business are very fast paced. They change directions a lot. They have very little to no processes in place

many times

when in fact, what if you’re working with an enterprise level client, there’s strict procedures for everything. You rarely change directions. You have to Log each and everything. There’s, there’s human resources to go through and all sorts of stuff. So small businesses, enterprise level client expertise is very, very different. All right. So make sure that if you’re hiring somebody for a small business that they have small business experience. Also, you want to find out if they deliver work in a timely manner. that’s easier said than done. What you want to do is look for the reviews. And if you see four star reviews to start a new three star reviews, and there’s a common complaint about delivering work in a timely manner, then that should bring up a red flag for you. Always ask them how busy are they? So say, Listen, this job is going to require 20 hours a week from you. How busy are you? If they say, Oh, we’ve got 10 clients, I’m super busy right now you know what might not be a good time for you to take on another client. Another tip I’ll give you is are they doing the work themselves or outsourcing it one time I hired somebody to do SEO for me, and it turned out that he wasn’t in fact doing the SEO. He was just outsourcing it to somebody in India and I went ahead and I had a discovery call with this guy. We melted great. We had great personality, he had a great personality. He was mentioning all the stuff that he do. It just sounded fantastic. You know, he hit the nail on the head. He just impressed me in every way. But it turned out after the fact that he’s not the one actually doing the work. He’s actually just outsourcing it, and then he’s delivering it. He was just essentially a salesman for the work. All right. So you need to ask them directly. Are you the one doing the work yourself? Or are you outsourcing it? Alright, I have a couple more tips for you here on what you should look for when you’re hiring freelancers. Another one is, will they agree to internal processes? Or do they require you to use their own tools? So here’s an example. I personally like to use teamwork, calm to manage all my projects. Now someone might come to me and this has happened for Hey, Mike. I use Asana to manage all my products, or all my projects. I use Trello. Well, great. If you’re going to do that on your time, you can do that. But I use teamwork and I’m Essentially, I’m hiring you. So you have to use one of the tools that I use. So if they are adamant about not using your software that you’re using and not melting in with your processes net will create a riff. And it will create more inefficiencies with you as you begin to work together. And the last tip I have for you for when you are hiring freelancers things you should look for is how do they like to communicate? I was interviewing a freelancer I was just getting ready to say you know what, you’ve got the job. You’re great and things like oh, by the way, I only use WhatsApp to communicate now right there that was a red flag because I don’t use WhatsApp and I don’t like WhatsApp. I’ve had too many technical issues with it before. So I use Skype I use phone I use email into a very far extent I use texting only as an emergency but that’s a whole other podcast amongst itself and why you shouldn’t use texting to communicate on a business level but I do not use WhatsApp. I asked him to get a Skype account. He refused and you know what I moved on to the next Freelancer so it’s always important that you guys use the same tools to communicate. So I know there’s a lot of tips I just covered in about eight minutes here but I hope you find these helpful. The next time you want to go hire a freelance.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: What should I look for when hiring freelancers? Reviews Google them Specific work, not so much in your industry, but the type of work you need done. So not just SEO, ecommerce SEO is more specific What’s their background? Show Notes: What should I look for when hiring freelancers? Reviews Google them Specific work, not so much in your industry, but the type of work you need done. So not just SEO, ecommerce SEO is more specific What’s their background? Do they have experience with SMB? Enterprise level clients? Can they deliver in the … What should I look for when hiring freelancers? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 8:31
An Interview with Laura Pennington Briggs: Successful Freelancer Writer https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-laura-pennington-briggs-successful-freelancer-writer/ Tue, 03 Sep 2019 00:07:43 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3699 https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-laura-pennington-briggs-successful-freelancer-writer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-laura-pennington-briggs-successful-freelancer-writer/feed/ 0 Show Notes Laura Pennington Briggs owns betterbizacademy.com. She is a freelance writer, a coach, an author and an entrepreneur who threw out her entire business model in 2015. She fired half her clients and made some new commitments, one of which was to work only with clients who allowed her to grow her business the …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/an-interview-with-laura-pennington-briggs-successful-freelancer-writer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">An Interview with Laura Pennington Briggs: Successful Freelancer Writer</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

Laura Pennington Briggs owns betterbizacademy.com. She is a freelance writer, a coach, an author and an entrepreneur who threw out her entire business model in 2015. She fired half her clients and made some new commitments, one of which was to work only with clients who allowed her to grow her business the way she wanted

 

 

  1. You mention on your website, one of the biggest changes in your business came when you hired your first VA. Can you tell us about your decision to do that and the effect it had on your business?
  2. Let’s talk about keep clients happy, what tips can you provide our freelance audience about the best ways to keep a client happy? And what does it mean to keep them happy?
  3. Freelancers coming in now see a sea of competition, what are some tips you have for them getting started without having to worry about the other freelancers out there?
  4. How do you determine your freelance rate and does it change often?
  5. How do you scope out your competition?
  6. Where can our audience learn more about you?

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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to freelancing school today we’re interviewing successful writer, author, speaker you name it, she does it. Laura Briggs. Let’s get to the interview. Thank you for joining me today. I’m here with Laura.

Is it Briggs? Is that the best way to pronounce it or I know you do a hyphenated sometimes so or Yes.

Okay. It gets confusing, but yes, it’s Briggs is fine. Laura Briggs,

who owns better visit katomina.com. She’s a freelance writer. Listen to this freelance writer. She’s a coach and author and an entrepreneur who actually throughout her entire business model and 2015. So she fired half her clients, she made some new commitments to herself into her business, one of which was to work only with clients who allowed her to grow her business the way that she wanted. And we’re going to talk a little bit about that and her successes along the way. If you check her out on Upwork, you’ll see she’s a very active Upwork Freelancer who’s got a lot of attention and captured a lot of revenue. So I want to talk to her a little bit about that. But first, I noticed on your website, by the way, welcome to the show.

Hey, thanks for having me.

I noticed on your website that one of the biggest changes you mentioned in your business came from the point at which you hired your first virtual assistant, otherwise known as a VA and I agree with that I kind of the same way. I wanted to talk to you about your decision to do that, and then what impact it had on your business. So can you tell us a little bit about that?

Sure. So most of us freelancers have been doing everything ourselves since we started and it’s really hard to give up control, partly because we get this mindset said, Okay, my success is, you know, built on me. And if I give that any piece of that to someone else, I’m risking the potential for mistakes to be made. And so a lot of people have hesitations about doing that. But one of my mentors sort of early on pointed out to me that I was actually losing money and leaving money on the table by doing all the $20 $25 an hour and $30 an hour tasks that were not the best use of my time, and it was blocking me from making other revenue. So he actually encouraged me to start outsourcing at home first, he’s like you’re not buying a lawn mower and mowing your own huge lawn. So you’re going to outsource that first. And then I grew that into working with a virtual assistant and one of the first VA is I ever hired is still working with me today. And so now I work with several VA to help run my business and keep things streamlined, but it’s made a huge impact. I often hear people say it seems like you’re everywhere. I see you everywhere. You’re doing all these things. That is a mirage. Right, like it’s only because there’s all these people behind the scenes, who helped make everything sort of come to life and make it seem as though I’m everywhere at the same

Yeah, you kind of taken the same approach. I started off hiring a VA just for general things like redundant work and and now I have a few of them that are specialists in certain areas that I think that’s better but I don’t think hiring any VA to get started is a bad idea for freelancers who are just starting to feel that that they can’t scale anymore. They don’t have any more free time. You’re thinking about the highest and best use of your time I talked about that in Freelancer masterclass, the highest and best use of your time anything other than that, you’ve got to outsource. Let’s shift direction a little bit in terms of like, let’s make talk about making clients happy. Okay, so can you talk a little bit about your tips for making clients happy? That’s a big, hot button for clients could or are freelancers because keeping existing clients is 19 times easier than finding new ones and that’s a statistical fact. There was a study done I believe by marketing channel So why why would you want to spend time searching for new clients when you could just focus on keeping existing ones happy. So tell us about how you do that. Because you seem to do that very, very well.

existing clients don’t just generate future business in their contracts, they’re also more likely to send you testimonials and referrals to other clients like them. So it’s just smart business across the board. Keep your existing clients happy. I think two of the easiest ways to do that are asked questions up front. So don’t wait until the day before something is due to say, Hey, I don’t understand the instructions. Or this doesn’t make sense. Offer to get on that 15 minute phone call and say, hey, I’ve got four questions. I think we can knock these out pretty quickly. I don’t want to start on your project until I understand what it is you’re asking. And then the second one is literally meeting deadlines. I joke that it’s half the reason I’m in business because other writers cannot meet deadlines, but be realistic with your deadlines. If the client says I need it tomorrow and that’s not feasible. It’s better to pass on that project. Because you’re going to burn the bridge with that potential client forever if they’re not willing to work with you. And if you say sure I can do it tomorrow, and you really can’t, and then you let them down. So it’s far better to say that’s an unrealistic deadline, I could get it to you in three days would that work? Worst case scenario, they’re going to say no, but that’s much better than dealing with the other situation where the client is angry, and then has to go hire somebody all over again. So be realistic with your deadlines and stick to them.

Those are two very good tips. One of the tips I always give is set expectations on your communication early. When you’re filling out your scope work, tell them that, hey, I answer emails three times a day, or you can call me anytime as long as you schedule it on my calendar, because unscheduled calls, I have to stick to client work. You know, I said that early, because I tell them, you know, if you start off responding to your clients really fast, they’re going to expect that for the length of the relationship. And you know, what, if you start responding them 10 minutes slower than you normally do. you’re seen as a kind of a little bit of a degradation of quality. There you go. Don’t want that even though you’re still responding fast then see them. So those are some good tips in there, as you know, freelancers, there’s hundreds of thousands of them on Upwork. There’s a sea of competition. We talk about competition for a little bit and, and maybe your tips on, on how someone can separate themselves from feeling like they have an endless amount of competition and in dust, doing the obvious thing, having to reduce their price just to get a job.

Yeah, so it’s important to remember that people are hiring you. They’re not actually hiring the service that you do, because there are thousands of people who do the service that you do, but they don’t all do it in the way that you do with the personality and professionalism that you bring to the table. So stop trying to compete on things like price, because honestly, you can’t, you can never compete with the cheapest person because someone will always potentially underbid you, right. It’s a good strategy for potentially getting your foot in the door. But after that, it’s time to start thinking about and asking your clients what Isn’t that makes me different, you know, what is the experience that my clients enjoy having with me. And using that in your marketing, even on competitive platforms like Upwork, I know that when I submit a bid, I will not be the cheapest person. Sometimes I even directly say that in my proposal, but I’ll focus on other things that clients have told me about working with me, because that’s going to repel those people who are shopping on price alone. And it’s going to attract those people who are like, Yeah, I’m fine with paying for quality, because you have the background or the approach that I need for this specific project.

I put that in our proposal to I say, Hey, I’m not the cheapest, and that that’s not for them. It’s, it’s for me, I don’t want to deal with clients who are going to price challenge me and I want them to know, you know, in fact, I would be considered as a premium price and I want those clients that are willing to pay a premium price. Yeah. By the way, what type of writer Are you have a certain niche or certain type of work that you’d like to take on more than others?

Yeah, it’s shifted for a long time. It was attorneys, most of my core retainer clients I write their blogs and website content. So that’s a niche that I rock pretty often. But I’m doing more and more email newsletter writing sales, copywriting building online courses for people marketing consulting. So it goes kind of a little bit all over the place. I’ve also done some content management, hiring teams of other writers and setting that up for businesses as well. But mostly, it’s blogs, website content and emails. Cool. That’s a good

niche, because content is king. So yeah, that’s, that’s great. How do you determine your rate? How can we, you know, a freelancer listening to this thing? Am I charging too much or too little? I mean, is there a formula that you use? Or is it just kind of it also to piggyback on that question, how often you change your room.

So I changed my rate. Often I raise my rates on existing clients at least once or twice a year, I changed my rate on Upwork specifically all the time, because I’m just always testing it to see if people are sensitive to that, and to see if maybe I set it too low to where someone lands on my profile and thinks that I’m actually too cheap. Sometimes if I’m full booked, I pushed my rate up really high so that only someone who really, really wants to work with me, I do that too. So it depends on a lot of things. I’ll say that if you’re fully booked, and you’ve been that way, a long time, your rate is too low. And if you’re not converting anyone and as soon as you state your price, everyone goes to you, then your rate is probably a little too high

or your value proposition the way you’re positioning yourself is not good enough right now. Yes. Okay. So So yeah, I mean, we’re just talking about competition. We talked about price and going back to competition a little bit, how do you scope out your Do you have competition even worry about it? And if so, how do you keep a pulse on your competition?

So the only thing I really worry about with my competition is if they’re stealing something that I’ve created, so I write quite a bit on places like LinkedIn about my niche. So unless somebody directly takes something from me, I don’t really worry about it because and even as a freelance coach, right, like there’s plenty of competition out there, but that’s okay because I still want someone to feel helped if they land on my site or my YouTube channel and say she’s not for me, I don’t like her. That’s fine. That’s valuable to know. Right? So you only want to work with the people who are absolutely right for you. So I often don’t think about other freelancers, I think that compare and despair is a real thing that freelancers get into. They’re always like, that person’s ahead of me, they charge more, they seem to be doing this better. And it’s a really negative place to go mindset wise, because you can’t really drag yourself out of that you can always find someone who at least appears to be doing better than you. And it’s not a productive exercise. So why do it?

Yeah, I don’t actually know somebody who’s not a freelancer, but he’s a successful business owner. He has like, I don’t know, I don’t know what network it’s got to be at least 10 to 15 million looking at his house and his cars and stuff. And he’s just negative because he’s looking at somebody who has 60 million is those kind of people are just never happy. You just gotta open yourself and you’ll be fine. If you just do all the practices and the teachings that Laura and I show you along the way the tips. So I you’ve done a TEDx talk, and that’s one of the things that In. I mean, I introduced you as a writer, a coach and author but didn’t talk about your speaking engagements. Can you talk a little bit about what you do on a speaking engagement wise? I mean, are you on tour now? Or do you just do as they come up?

I sort of do them as they come up. But it’s it’s kind of been like a tour this entire summer. I’ve been at a number of conferences. I was just at the editorial freelancers Association last week delivering to talks to that group. And I really enjoy doing speaking because it’s another way to get the word out there about freelancing. The reason I went for a TED talk specifically, is because I felt that there were not enough people talking about how much work is changing and why freelancers are jumping ship and staying there, right. It’s not out of desperation. It’s not because we can’t find another job. A lot of more people are choosing to go freelance and stay that way full time because it suits their lifestyle better. So I love speaking because it’s a new way to share your information with people to inspire other people who never thought about it. One of my TEDx talks was at Georgia Tech and it was like My target audience of millennials. And so afterwards, I did not even get to eat after that event because it was two hours worth of people in line. All students asking questions. How do I freelance? How do I start? What do I do? I’m graduating next year. And so it really showed to me there’s a lot of people that have these questions and concerns. And that’s why I like doing speaking, because it helps introduce you to a whole new group of people.

Yeah, that’s well said. I think there’s no freelancing major in school is there, they’re just prepare you for working with someone they set you up for that, hey, your time is your money and you got to work eight to five and you know, you and I are trying to break that that cycle. Is there a freelancing major somewhere and I know there’s entrepreneurship, that’s not quite the same thing.

It’s not the same and there are some I’m seeing more and more schools. I think UC San Diego has a program. They have like certifications and copy editing, digital marketing, that sort of thing that anyone can take, which I think is huge, because that’s not really anywhere else and a lot of schools curriculum still, but a lot of schools are still old fashion. I even offered to come speak to professors class in the business department a couple of years ago and he said, Oh, we don’t want to teach students about freelancing. We’re preparing them for real careers. And I was like, so my job isn’t real. IRS thinks it is.

Prince opinion there.

I’ll tell you I’ve made way more money, freelancing, a habit, any salary job, that’s for sure. Exactly, exactly. A lot of a lot of professionals are retired from from their eight to five jobs Anyway, you know, they’re just they’re doing that as, you know, just their own for their own thing, own reasons. But, you know, given how popular freelancing is, and the stats at Upwork has coming out, they do a lot of research about how much what is it like a third of the workforce now does at least some kind of freelancing? I mean, I’m shocked that there’s no kind of freelancing major or something that maybe we should start looking at a university so

well, and especially because we have such a technical skills gap here in the US and all over the world. We teach students a certain thing and then they graduate and they show up at their interviews and the interviewer says, Okay, do you You know, Salesforce, Do you know ontraport? Do you know Infusionsoft? How are you running Facebook ads? And the students are like, I don’t know any of that.

No idea. So that’s how I found you is through one of your talks. I would encourage all anybody’s listening here and go to type in Laura Briggs or something similar like that just like talk or TEDx or something like you’ll find a lot of your talks on YouTube. What else can my audience learn more about you?

So I have my own podcast called Advanced freelancing. You can check that out on my website better biz academy. com and I’ve got a Facebook group of around 1000 freelancers pretty active, all very helpful positive atmosphere to it’s called mastering your freelance life with Laura.

Great and don’t you have a new book coming out?

My book just came out six weeks ago, sort of how to start your own freelance writing business with entrepreneur press. So that’s specific for those one of the writers and the whole is it on Amazon?

Where can we get this?

Yep, you can get on Amazon Barnes and Noble. It’s, there’s an audiobook version and pretty much any way you want to consume it.

Hey, after this interview, Send me a link to that. I’ll put it in the show notes to the podcast and on this YouTube videos, people can go ahead and buy it straight from there and I’ll link to a couple of the videos on YouTube. I saw you speaking which are great, too. Thank you so much for joining us. Hopefully we can talk more in the future.

Yeah, thank you.

Thanks a lot. Bye.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes Laura Pennington Briggs owns betterbizacademy.com. She is a freelance writer, a coach, an author and an entrepreneur who threw out her entire business model in 2015. She fired half her clients and made some new commitments, Show Notes Laura Pennington Briggs owns betterbizacademy.com. She is a freelance writer, a coach, an author and an entrepreneur who threw out her entire business model in 2015. She fired half her clients and made some new commitments, one of which was to work only with clients who allowed her to grow her business the … An Interview with Laura Pennington Briggs: Successful Freelancer Writer Read More » Mike Volkin 15:36
Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? https://freelancermasterclass.com/will-freelancing-give-you-the-basic-skills-to-run-a-small-business/ Mon, 02 Sep 2019 23:51:18 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3663 https://freelancermasterclass.com/will-freelancing-give-you-the-basic-skills-to-run-a-small-business/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/will-freelancing-give-you-the-basic-skills-to-run-a-small-business/feed/ 0 Show Notes: Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? Financial management Marketing Sales Customer service Leadership Project management Time management Delegation Network Team building Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/will-freelancing-give-you-the-basic-skills-to-run-a-small-business/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business?</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business?

  • Financial management
  • Marketing
  • Sales
  • Customer service
  • Leadership
  • Project management
  • Time management
  • Delegation
  • Network
  • Team building

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to another episode of freelancers school. I am Mike Volkin. And today’s topic is about the business skills that you need to run your freelancing business. So the topic is will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? So what I did is I outlined 10, the top 10 business skills that you need to run a small business and then how that correlates to freelancing. So if you aren’t familiar with some of these or if you feel like you need to brush up on some of them now is the time to start researching and look at courses online. Of course, I’m going to push Freelancer masterclass. If you want something more specific about one of these topics, you can go to any one of the sites like udimm. com umy.com. And look for a skill specific. For example, the first one on my list is financial management, right? So if you want to learn how to manage your finances as a small business owner, I’m sure I haven’t looked it up, but I’m sure who to me has a class on that. We do talk about money management in Freelancer masterclass, but something like outta me who has an entire course not just a class dedicated to it will go into much more depth. You’ll learn how to read p&l statements and balance sheets and all that good stuff. So if that’s what you are lacking and skill sets, it might be good to brush up on financial management. Another skill is marketing, of course, right? Because you want to market yourself. And that goes goes along with the third point, which is sales, marketing and sales kind of go together. There’s a gray area there. But when you’re on the phone trying to quote unquote convince a prospect to join or to sign with you, that would be sales marketing is getting your name out there getting your services out there. Customer Service, you might not think that freelancing has to do with customer service. But yeah, when you have clients, they are your customers. And you have to make sure they are treated appropriately. You have to know what to say and how to say it, how to communicate with them, not all is aligned with customer service. Another point I wanted to talk about was leadership. You know, I was lucky enough to learn leadership skills in the army. Some people are just natural born leaders. I am not a natural born leader. If you’re one of those people that always likes to sit up front at the head of the class, it likes to lead a conversation lead a networking event, those are your natural born leaders, but even natural born leaders need coaching and leadership themselves. So I would highly recommend everyone taking leadership courses I did I loved it. I changed the way I I lead not only projects but teams and it’s a skill that can always use improving. Project Management is another One of my list you know, as a freelancer, you’re going to be juggling many clients, hopefully. And each one of those clients might have many tasks, hopefully. So the more you clients you have, the more you have to juggle, right? So you have to figure out how to manage all that not only all the tasks, but all the timeline associated with the due dates to start dates. And if there’s other team members involved, they have to be managed as well. Maybe you’re the one being managed or are doing the managing but whatever the case, project management skills are necessary All right, I you know, I use teamwork calm if you’ve heard me. So I podcast before talk about teamwork. There’s Trello. There’s a sauna, all these other project management platforms that help you organize and keep all your tasks and projects aligned. That’s a big part of product management, and also managing your calendar appropriately that that helps you manage not just projects but your life. And that goes right into my next bullet point which is time management. You have To Be very careful managing your time as a freelancer This is probably one of the most tricky bullet points want to talk about today because as a freelancer, it’s very easy to lose yourself in time. You might find by the end of the day, you didn’t know client work because you’re doing busy work, you know, you’re checking your bank account or updating your social media before you know what the time is up. And you have to be self disciplined in freelancing too. So that’s why I talked about all the time. You have to live and die by your calendar every single day, put client management work in there, put your own prospecting in there because if you don’t prospect then you’re not going to have clients right? So you have to be always be prospecting, abp what I call it and manage your calendar, live and die by it, even the little things should go on your calendar. last three tips here delegation, you really have to understand how to delegate This is a big problem that I see with other freelancers trying to delegate tasks to the others, and it’s really mostly a communication issue. The freelancers would give out the wrong tasks, meaning they would give tasks to people who aren’t doing Students do it. Or they would just give them an improper deadline that has no meaning behind it just an artificial deadline. And lastly, the biggest problem I see with delegation is the way they communicate the tasks like they’re not polite about it, they don’t give clear direction they don’t manage up, okay, if you don’t know what that term means manage up should take Freelancer master class because we give a whole class on it. But Google managing up it’ll make a big difference when you’re learning how to project manage and delegate tasks to others. One of the other things you have to understand as a freelancer that also correlates to basic skills running a small business is networking. You have to be able to network whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert you there’s going to be times you’re going to have to network, whether you like it or not, whether it’s a small group gathering, or it’s a conference or a trade show, whatever, you have to get yourself out there. A lot of freelancers come to me saying oh, I just want to use up work and Freelancer in fiber and guru calm and all those sites and make my full time career that way. That can be done. It will be very difficult, though. Very difficult, you’ll have dry spells, you’ll be stuck in one way to market one way to prospect clients. And that is not a good way to run your business. I mean, what happens if the internet goes down at your at your place for a couple days? What are you going to do for prospecting? You know, so you have to have some other ways to prospect and networking is something that you should get good at. And if you’re not good at it, you know, the one of the things you can do is just go outside, sit in a coffee shop somewhere and just make a couple conversations with people and just kind of let it grow from there. Okay, and then sooner or later, you’ll be given speeches at big events, who knows, but you got to come outside your comfort zone a little bit as a freelancer. Okay, the last tip I have for you, is team building. If you don’t know how to build a team and you want to scale your company, then team building is an essential skill. Now it might seem obvious, and you might thought not think you need training on something like this. Oh, I know. build a team owners go to Upwork and find some freelancers and, and build my team that way. There’s more to it than that. You have to understand what you want your team to do. How are you going to deliver it? What processes are you going to use to manage the team? How are they going to work together? What happens if things goes bad? What’s your contingency plan? There’s a whole bunch of things you have to consider on team building and I bet if you go to EU to me, you will find some courses on building a good team. All right, I hope these tips helped until another day. Have a great one.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? Financial management Marketing Sales Customer service Leadership Project management Time management Delegation Network Team building Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancin... Show Notes: Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? Financial management Marketing Sales Customer service Leadership Project management Time management Delegation Network Team building Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to … Will freelancing give you the basic skills to run a small business? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:48
What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-good-ways-to-find-international-clients-as-a-freelancer/ Thu, 29 Aug 2019 15:12:19 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3633 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-good-ways-to-find-international-clients-as-a-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-good-ways-to-find-international-clients-as-a-freelancer/feed/ 0 What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer? Show notes: First, to attract international clients you need to have your profile and correspondence copywritten by someone in the country you’re trying to attract. Second, you need reviews and testimonials from clients in that country Third, you need to be familiar with …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-are-some-good-ways-to-find-international-clients-as-a-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer?</span> Read More »</a></p> What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer?

Show notes:

First, to attract international clients you need to have your profile and correspondence copywritten by someone in the country you’re trying to attract.
Second, you need reviews and testimonials from clients in that country
Third, you need to be familiar with the customs and greetings of that country. Trying to attract US-based clients with a “greetings of the day” doesn’t cut it
Fourth, you need to have a smooth payment system that is friendly to international payments
Fifth, you need to understand the exchange rate
Sixth, have a phone number local to that country
Seventh, try PPC ads targeting only prospects in those countries
Eighth, optimize your website to locally related keywords

Be sure to register to be a student at Freelancer Masterclass


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to another episode of freelancers school. I hope you all are doing well. Today we’re going to be discussing what are some good ways to find international clients as a freelance marketer. I am your host, Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass. You know, many of you want to for whatever reason, there could be many target clients that are outside of your country that you’re in. I don’t particularly do that, but I can speak to what you need to do in order to get those clients. I have however, had clients in over two dozen different countries, but I don’t specifically target a particular country by Everybody has their own wishes and desires. So let’s talk about how to get international clients as a freelancer. First, to attract international clients, you need to have your profile and correspondence copy written by someone in the country you’re trying to attract. So if you have an Upwork, profile Freelancer five or whatever platform you’re using, maybe even LinkedIn, okay, your profile needs to be tight, tight, tight, because anybody who’s going to be hiring you for any significant amount of money is going to look at your profile and review it. So I recommend having a copy written by someone in the country that you’re trying to attract the same clients from. Another tip is you need reviews and testimonials from clients in that country. It just shows the prospect that you’ve worked in that country before and you know the regional dialect and you know, the customs and all the idiosyncrasies that come with dealing with a client in another country so it gives them reassurance when they see those testimonials and reviews. Okay? Third, you need to be familiar with the customs and greetings of that country trying to attract US based clients with a subject line or an intro line and your email of greetings of the day. It doesn’t cut it. I can’t tell you how many times we’ve gotten emails with Hello, Sir, greetings of the day. And I’ve been called beautiful by another man. Many, many times, I guess it’s a common greeting and in a certain country, and they have no idea what I look like I’m sure I’m not saying I’m beautiful. I’m just saying that’s a common greeting in their country, but not in the US and it’s a little weird. Okay, so the fourth tip, you need to have a smooth payment system that is friendly to international payments. I’ve complained about this on our prior podcast about hiring freelancers in other countries and then they demand this these weird payments that I have to go through hoops just to get them paid and that is a serious roadblock. me now In fact, before I hire a freelancer in another country, I always ask what type of payment that they accept before I hire them. Because if it’s something I’ve never heard of, or something I know it’s going to give me issues. I just move on. Fifth. Now we’re talking about ways to find international clients as a freelance marketer. The fifth tip I have for you is you need to understand the exchange rate, and not just understand it, but communicate it. I hired a freelancer from Canada to do some social media postings for me about a year ago, and he had quoted me a price and I had paid it at the end, and then he complained that it was in US currency. Of course, it is in US currency because I’m in the US. But he was quoting me from his exchange rate, and that was not communicated it. I just asked him the amount and he told me, so make it clear when you’re working with clients or even other freelancers, someone you have to pay or even accept payment from in there in another country. Make sure you’re talking About the same currency exchange, okay, six have a phone number local to that country if possible. And I’m not talking about one z two z clients here and there from another country. I’m talking about if you want to make a full time or nearly full time living having many, many clients in a particular country, you are specifically targeting, you should have a local phone number specific to that country make it easy for them to communicate with you. Alright.

Seventh, try Pay Per Click ads targeting only prospects in those countries. You know, pay per click ads are very powerful in many respects, but mostly because you can target people almost down to the street level. So if you want to pick up clients in a particular country, you just set your geographic preferences on Google ads or Facebook ads, even Reddit or Cora or Twitter, Instagram, whatever platform you’re on, and you set your criteria to be for that particular country. That way you know you’re targeting only clients. in that country. And the last tip I have for you if you want to target clients in another country is to optimize your website to locally related keywords. Everywhere you go. There are different dialects and ways to say certain things and keywords, even from state to state in the United States. So that makes SEO that much more difficult. So if you’re going to another country, they may call certain things in your industry different. And you want to make sure your website is optimized for that if you want to pick up the right traffic. Okay, so hopefully these tips helped. And if you haven’t already, please subscribe to this podcast, because we published very often tips, tricks and hacks for freelancers to grow their career.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer? Show notes: First, to attract international clients you need to have your profile and correspondence copywritten by someone in the country you’re trying to attract. Second, What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer? Show notes: First, to attract international clients you need to have your profile and correspondence copywritten by someone in the country you’re trying to attract. Second, you need reviews and testimonials from clients in that country Third, you need to be familiar with … What are some good ways to find international clients as a freelancer? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 6:04
9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for https://freelancermasterclass.com/9-things-you-may-want-to-consider-charging-freelance-clients-for/ Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:36:23 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3610 https://freelancermasterclass.com/9-things-you-may-want-to-consider-charging-freelance-clients-for/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/9-things-you-may-want-to-consider-charging-freelance-clients-for/feed/ 0 Show Notes: 9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for. #9 is very controversial! Meetings Rush Work Research Revisions Scope creep Software/tools Late payments Cancellations (meetings) Processing fees (controversial) Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/9-things-you-may-want-to-consider-charging-freelance-clients-for/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes:

9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for. #9 is very controversial!

  1. Meetings
  2. Rush Work
  3. Research
  4. Revisions
  5. Scope creep
  6. Software/tools
  7. Late payments
  8. Cancellations (meetings)
  9. Processing fees (controversial)

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Yes, it’s time for Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin, your host and lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass. Today, we’re going to be going through nine things you may want to consider charging freelance clients for. I talked to a lot of freelancers all day long, and I know a lot of times they get lacks and charging these things I’m going to share with you that you should really consider charging for and number nine is pretty controversial. So listen all the way to the end. The first item on the list is meetings. So many times freelancers will not charge for meetings. But remember, as a freelancer, your time is Your money. So you should absolutely charge for meetings. And if you don’t, some clients will take advantage of that I had a client once, who started calling for three hours of meetings a day, I had a one on one meeting with him about the daily agenda. I had a team meeting with him and my team together. And I had just a meeting with me and my team. Those three meetings alone took up half my day. And at first I was not charging for them. But quickly, I realized that half my day almost is gone. So I should start charging for them and you should too. Now it’s a policy of mine If a client wants an hour of my time, or even more than 15 minutes since I bill in 15 minute increments that I will be charging the client. Any client who disagrees with this is unreasonable and doesn’t understand freelance work, and you should not be continuing with them. There’s plenty of other clients out there that you can work with Number two rushworth this is something I’ve recently instilled in my freelance work that I am absolutely loving because many clients will take advantage and have these artificial timelines built in and they need something done yesterday. And I never used to charge that for that. But then I started thinking know what I’ve got 10 clients and seven of them are always putting their work as top priority. So you have to have a good communication with your clients early on to know that rush work will be an extra whatever it is 10% 15% of your hourly rate and if it’s a project based client, meaning you’re not charging per hour, then you should have a separate line item in your contract that says rush work will be an extra and then set the amount. Okay, the third thing you may want to consider charging your clients for is research. Many times a client will ask you to bring them some inspiration for example if you’re doing website design them Can you bring me three website sites that you think would be great for me or if you’re doing design work. Can you give me some examples of some similar work that you see out there based on my desires of what I’ve described to you Whatever the case, if you’re doing research for them, again, your time is money. So you should make it clear to the client that if they’re asking you do work, whether it’s research or meetings that that is billable. Number four on my list is revisions. So many times I see freelancers, especially designers and web developers that don’t have revision clauses in their contract. So if you’re developed developing a website for somebody, and you don’t have a revisions contract, then they can literally go on and on forever with revisions and you have little to no recourse or end of the work that they could possibly be giving you and you can’t charge for it. So in your contract, you should have a limit of three revisions especially if you’re some kind of developer or designer where revisions are common in your practice. Number five scope creep that is a term that is used in the freelancing and agency world scope creep is when the client asks you to do something that is outside the terms of the original contract. This is why having an agreement in place is so important. That clearly defines the scope of work, because this will take you outside of what you were hired for, to do some extra work for the client. And especially if it’s a per project client, that they’ve given you a set amount of money for, let’s just say as an example, we’re sticking with the concept of hire being hired for web development. You’re building them a website, that’s what you’re being paid for. But now they’re asking you to do a little bit of on page search engine optimization, and or to install these extra plugins. That is scope creep, and you should absolutely charge for those. Same with logo designs, you know, We’re using that as an example, if the contract states that you’re going to be giving them a Photoshop file and they asked for an Adobe Illustrator file, you’ve got to do an extra little bit of work there to deliver those extra files. So you should charge for those. That’s an example of scope creep.

software and tools. This is a great example for you marketers out there. I know from my perspective, whenever I’m doing research work for influencers or for SEO, there are certain tools that I pay for sometimes over $100 a month that saved the client a lot of money, because it saves me time and doing research. So let’s say for example, I have a software platform I use, that helps me identify influencers for a client people that have an existing audience that I want the client to reach out to. And this would save the client probably six hours of work for every one hour work that I do, but I’m paying for it. So why would I not pass that payment on to a client. And another example of is SEO, there’s lots of tools out there that can save the client a lot of time in me doing SEO research. But if I didn’t have this tool, I would have charged the client 10 hours to do all this research manually. But because I’m paying for this tool, I only need to charge them an hour, but I’m paying for the tool. So why would I not carry off that charge to the client as well. So think about what tools you use that save you time to build your client, you should absolutely pass those on to your client, or build that into your per project rate. If it’s a project client, project based client, late payments number seven. If you are not on top of sending invoices, the client will most likely take advantage of that. So you have to have in your invoices and on your agreement the day that they’re due. Because if they don’t make a payment by that date, then they’re considered late in your agreement. You should have late charges. Absolutely. bide by those. Now some freelancers give a one time pass. And what they do is if the payment is five days later, oh God even longer, that’s terrible, but it happens a lot. You send a one time message saying, Listen, this is outside of our normal agreement, the payment date. And the next time I’ll have to instill the late payment that is outlined in our agreement that is there a very nice way to put it and it’s very reasonable. All right, Number eight, cancellations. A lot of times clients will book a time with you on your calendar. And I’ve mentioned tools in the past where they can schedule time with you like calendly for example, I have this I have a imbedded calendly calendar on my website. That’s a tongue twister calendly calendar. It’s on my website. So I give this to clients when they onboard with me I say listen, whenever you want to book a time with me, please schedule something because you can’t just call me on the fly as and dedicate non scheduled time. client work, and I’ve never had a client disagree or complain about that. So I tell him to schedule time with me. But then if they cancel the meeting, I’ve literally booked time for them and set aside time for them. If they cancel I have in my agreement less than an hour away, if they don’t show up or cancel less than an hour away from the appointment that I charge them for. Many of you will feel uncomfortable doing that. And you might feel like a jerk telling a client that you’re going to charge them for a meeting or it might be in your agreement. You might feel bad putting that in your agreement. But believe me to prevent clients from pushing you around subconsciously they might not even be doing it. But usually I find that clients at Miss or cancel meetings do it consistently. And if that happens a lot, it’s costing you quite a bit of money because again, your time as a freelancer is your money. So absolutely charge for cancelled meetings within a reasonable time. And reasonable is within an hour or less of in my mind. I know freelance is your charge clients that cancel with it less than a day because their entire day is full. And that’s what they feel is justifiable and more power to you if you want to do that. I absolutely agree with that. So now it’s time for the ninth item, the one that is the most controversial, and that’s processing fees. I am against this, but I know lots and lots of freelancers who charge for this. And I’ll tell you right now that if you’re a freelancer that I’m considering hiring, if you charge me a processing fee, you’re gone. Okay. But I know lots of freelancers, especially overseas ones outside the US that charge processing fees, you should, in my opinion, build processing fees into your hourly rate or into your project rate. It should just be a cost of doing business. What is a processing fee, it’s the feet of wire money to you is the fee to process a credit card payment. Many freelancers will throw this as a line item in their invoice. So I think I’m paying somebody 10 hours of work for $50 an hour. I think I have a five hundred dollar invoice coming to me. But then it’s $500 plus 3%. And now all of a sudden, there’s this extra charge that I didn’t expect. And it was never explained to me it’s not in the agreement, and it causes a rift between the clients now, this is one of those issues that I find a split right down the middle 5050 50% of freelancers say absolutely charge of processing fee and here’s why. And the other 50% are don’t do it. And here’s why. So Be that as it may, that is a ninth item on our list, and it is controversial. I’m not saying to do it. I’m not saying not to do it. I’m just saying that if I’m hiring you, as a freelancer, you shouldn’t do it. And you should be clear with your client up front if you are going to do it, because that will affect my hiring decision. I do not do it for my clients as a freelancer. So I hope you enjoyed these tips. I listed nine items today you want to consider charging your clients for and if you don’t charge for some of them You should consider doing that today and at least putting them in your agreement. So if you want to charge them you have a justifiable reason to do so. Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes: 9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for. #9 is very controversial! Meetings Rush Work Research Revisions Scope creep Software/tools Late payments Cancellations (meetings) Processing fees (controversial) Raw Transcri... Show Notes: 9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for. #9 is very controversial! Meetings Rush Work Research Revisions Scope creep Software/tools Late payments Cancellations (meetings) Processing fees (controversial) Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. … 9 Things You May Want to Consider Charging Freelance Clients for Read More » Mike Volkin clean 11:29
Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our Guest Today https://freelancermasterclass.com/latasha-james-host-of-the-freelance-friday-podcast-is-our-guest-today/ Thu, 22 Aug 2019 16:54:10 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3599 https://freelancermasterclass.com/latasha-james-host-of-the-freelance-friday-podcast-is-our-guest-today/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/latasha-james-host-of-the-freelance-friday-podcast-is-our-guest-today/feed/ 0 Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our guest today. She offers fantastic insight into how she became a successful freelancer and how a freelancer can get more exposure online. You won’t want to miss this episode! Check her out at LatashaJames.com, she has a great YouTube channel you should follow and great …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/latasha-james-host-of-the-freelance-friday-podcast-is-our-guest-today/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our Guest Today</span> Read More »</a></p> Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our guest today. She offers fantastic insight into how she became a successful freelancer and how a freelancer can get more exposure online. You won’t want to miss this episode! Check her out at LatashaJames.com, she has a great YouTube channel you should follow and great resources for freelancers on her site.

So you have two great YouTube channels to follow. Latasha James’s YouTube channel and our own. Don’t forget to register to be a student at Freelancer Masterclass.

Latasha Bio:

Latasha James is the founder of James + Park, a digital marketing company based in Detroit. She is also a YouTube content creator, marketing coach, and host of The Freelance Friday Podcast. She has worked on both sides of the social media marketing space, creating marketing strategies and fostering community for businesses large and small, and has worked with dozens of brands on partnerships through her own personal brand.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to this edition of freelancers school today. I’m very excited. We have a guest with us on the show today. And her name is Latasha James. She is a very popular Freelancer who puts out a lot of great content and I’ve asked her some questions about how you can become not only a full time freelancer, if you’re a part time freelancer, but how you can get more attention as a freelancer to better grow and scale your business. So let’s go ahead and get to the interview. Okay, everybody, welcome. This is Mike Volkin. I am the lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass and today we have Latasha James with us She’s the founder of Jameson Park, a digital marketing company based in Detroit. And she is also a youtube content creator. That’s how I originally found her by her great YouTube videos. She’s a marketing coach. She’s the host of freelance Friday podcast. She’s got a lot of things going on. She has worked on both sides, social media, marketing space, creating marketing strategies and fostering community for businesses large and small, and has worked with dozens of brands on partnerships throughout her own personal brand. Thanks for joining us, Latasha.

Thank you so much for having me. I’m excited to be here.

Yeah, I see you have a bunch of great resources for freelancers. We’re going to go through some of those and you have a popular YouTube channel. One of my favorites for freelancers. Actually. You have an E course a podcast. Can you tell us a little bit about how you got started as a freelancer?

Yeah, yeah. So I honestly kind of just fell into freelancing. It is the least exciting story. Honestly. I was in college and You know, as most college students do, they need more resources. I was working a retail job and, you know, struggling to get by your typical college student. And I was just kind of browsing, I always sort of had my feelers out and my eyes and ears open for new opportunities. So I had been a blogger, just personally, like the dumbest blog on

music that I liked, or

it’s not the dumbest blog. You haven’t seen my first blog.

I guess maybe that’s where it all started.

But yeah, I mean, it was it was just a fun vibe. But I didn’t really like to write and I really like the process of blogging. So I actually ran across on LinkedIn. A gig essentially like a freelance gig for an education writer. There is this education blog, and they were looking for student writers essentially. So I applied to it. It was like $20 an article and I just started there. And yeah, I mean, I grew my freelance business actually went to school for film, so Once I started to realize kind of how freelancing worked and taking on different projects, I would work with different video projects while I was in school. So I worked with some authors and you know, did a bunch of different marketing videos and things like that. And over time, I ended up being able to do the freelancing thing full time while I was in school and got to leave my retail job. So that was really cool. And then obviously, I, you know, went in between corporate and full time freelance. And between that and i i’ve been full time freelance for the past couple years. So

yeah, that’s great. Nothing beats being a full time freelancer. It’s awesome. Unfortunately, it’s it’s a part time job for probably 95% of us. So we’re out to change that hopefully. Right. You and I. You have a popular YouTube channel, would you recommend that as a way for freelancers to grow their business? And if so, can you give us some some freelancers, some of the guidelines and how to grow a YouTube channel like you have?

Yeah, yeah, I mean, I do recommend I think I recommend it with a caveat I guess that you have to really Buffett. I mean, it sounds so cheesy. But I mean, you’re going to be working on your YouTube channel for a while without really seeing a ton of return for it. And one of those kind of slow build type thing.

Yeah, I describe it as like, like a rolling snowball downhill. Like you’ll spend a lot of time forming that snowball and you give it a push, and you don’t see much return until like at the end, and it’s like, wow, all this stuff’s happening. And you know, you get thousands of views a day, and then it’s just really exciting, right?

Absolutely. Yeah. I mean, I’ve had my YouTube channel for over five years. So it’s, it’s old in YouTube. Yeah. You know, and I mean, I really, I didn’t truly see a ton of return. I definitely wasn’t getting paid a ton from Google AdSense and all of that in the very beginning. And now it’s honestly responsible for like, between 90 and 95% of my website traffic. I mean, I don’t do a ton of outbound prospecting or anything, most people I mean, just like you said, You found me on YouTube. Yes, people find me on YouTube. It’s the second biggest search engine on the web. So yeah, it’s It’s definitely a good, it’s definitely good. But I truly do like love the process. You know, I love creating videos, that’s really fine for me to engage with my audience. So I, I say you definitely have to watch it.

Yeah. Yeah. And you’re well spoken. So it kind of lends itself to videos and podcasting, which you take advantage of, you know, in one of your YouTube videos, the one where I found you, you talk about negotiating freelance contracts and and how discounting your rate is a frequent issue. And I can’t tell you, I mean, at least twice a day I get that from a freelancer is what how do I respond to that? You know, can you talk a bit about what you say when you’re asked to discount your rent?

Yeah, so I think there’s a couple of things to this number one, you know, adding pricing to my website or price ranges to my website into like, my Intake Forms has really helped with that. That’s that was an area and I know that’s a kind of a big debate. I’m curious to hear what you think of it too, but that’s a big debate in this community of putting pricing on websites or not, but it has really helped me kind of weed out some of the people who are, you know, have $100 marketing budget and things like that. Yeah. So I don’t, all of my packages really are bespoke, like they’re very custom to each each client. So I don’t have, you know, this package cost this much or this this much. But on the intake form, I just have a range like, what is your marketing budget? Is it between $500 and $1,000? That kind of thing. And that’s really helped down some of those conversations. And then yeah, I mean, I think the other big piece of advice, which is the hardest piece of advice, and again, it’s very simple, but very hard is you just have to be permanent. Yeah. I mean, you really, it really is an internal thing. I think that I had to get over because I’m such a people pleaser. nice person. I want to make people happy.

Yeah. You know, I know and

I really want to help people. That’s why I do what I do. So I think it is just about realizing, like I’ve taken I’ve been there Believe me I’ve taken You know, the lowball contracts and just kind of things, and I haven’t been quite as proud of the work that I’ve done, or I haven’t slept, you know what I mean? Because I’m running around trying to manage a bajillion really small clients. So I just have to kind of remember that and like if I really want to truly help this client and do the best work that I can for them, I can’t take $100 contractor Yeah, okay, I need it and kind of just explaining that to them to like, not necessarily explaining how many hours you’re spending on their project or that kind of thing, but just explaining that, you know, you really do like to kind of put as much as you can and to each of your, each of your clients and that’s kind of why your price the way that you are, I know

Yeah, you said it exactly the way I would have answered it. I put my price on my website. Because when I did, it almost changed overnight. I stopped dealing with setting up phone calls with people that couldn’t even come close to affording my services. And then not only that, but didn’t truly understand like what I did you know, I’m a fractional cmo. I help with strategy I I don’t do one or two hour jobs it’s not I would take you on at a minimum if you have a three month commitment for me so once I did that people would would understand and it also holding firm in your price. I felt like a biggest jerk when I when I first started doing that was like, No, I really can’t lower my rate even $20 an hour. Yeah, I can’t do that. Because this is what I’m valued at. And the biggest thing I would tell freelancers is have your objections written out. So when somebody asks you about that you don’t stumble across that then you don’t seem like a jerk if you if you have your yourself priced right then you should be able to tell a client realistically justify your charge basically right. You know, I I noticed you have an E course on social media. And let me just give a quick plug to your website. It’s Latasha James. Calm, right? Yeah. Okay. Would you recommend freelancers creating an E course not not to try to get sales or part of the revenue but really to showcase their expertise. Like, if you have a course on social media and a prospect comes to you wanting to hire you from social media, it just makes you seem that much better. Hey, this person teaches social media, this person has written a book like, would you recommend freelancers do that?

Yeah, yeah, I definitely think so. I mean, I get the question a lot, too. Are we kind of at peak saturation for courses? Yeah.

I feel like everybody has a course.

Or everybody has. So yeah, I mean, I do think I don’t think that we’re there. I get the same question about YouTube channels to like, yeah, now I think if your content is good, and you’re passionate about it, and you’re giving value, it doesn’t matter how many how many editors are out there. So that that’s the key is it really does have to be valuable? You know, don’t just put out a course just because you just because you want to say that you did, of course. Same with the book. You know, I see people writing books all the time that are like, you took like, two weeks to write this book and kind of throw it together. So make sure that it’s truly valuable. Yeah. And something that you’re really proud of, because, yes, definitely like the revenue is great, too. I’m all about having multiple revenue streams. I think that is like the best piece of advice. I could really give

diversify.

Yeah, absolutely. So it does help. I mean, it’s not a it’s not the hugest revenue stream that I have. But it is significant and it does help for but but not even just for that, just like you said, it leads to other things. You know, it led me to realize that there was a market for coaching for you know, freelance coaching, which I never even saw myself doing. Or, you know, I didn’t want to be another one of those coaches that has any course not, you know, yeah, people really responded to the course and it opened the door for me there. And even with clients, like you said, a lot of times they’ll stumble, stumble across it and be like, oh, like, she seems to know what she’s talking about, at least. Yeah. So yeah, yeah, I mean, I definitely recommend it. You have the value to go.

Yeah, how long were you a freelancer before you started doing your courses?

I would say about four years.

Okay, so it was quite a while before you decided to put together these core and how long were you a part time freelance before you just decided, hey, let me just do this full time.

Um, so yeah, I was freelance. I was still freelancing part time when I watched the course. So I got four years and then I went freelance about a year after

okay. Yeah, good. Well, let’s talk about that. And let’s that kind of leads me into my last question I have for you since you and I are both on a crusade to help part time freelancers enjoy being full time, freelancers, and living the life they want to live and commanding their own salary. What are what are some of the tips that you would have for part time freelancers who want to become full time freelancers and really get serious and make a business out of it? Do you have any good tips that aren’t so difficult that can’t be done? I want I like actionable tips that somebody can can leave this podcast slash video and just go and do trial today. Do you have anything like that to kind of put you on the spot?

Oh, absolutely. So number one is take some clients you know i cannot recommend that enough. I was working a lot when I was in my corporate job. You know, I essentially had two full time jobs.

Yeah, it’s hard. It has to be a turnover, there has to be a time where you’re taking on on some clients just to get your feet wet and freelancing. Right. So you can’t just transition full time into freelancing. It’s very difficult. Yeah, absolutely.

Yeah. And like I said, I mean, I was freelancing for four years, part time, you know, on and off, I wasn’t doing like 80 hours a week. That whole four years. Yeah, I always at least had one or two clients for those four years and was open to projects. So I think that is like your best way to give it a test run. And somebody put it to me like this. They were like if you’re making you know, this amount of money at this, this income through your business with only 10 hours a week or 20 hours a week, like just do math. Good. Yeah. And it doesn’t always translate exactly that way of course, but you know, with 40 extra hours in the week, it does start to become a little bit more realistic. So take at least a few test clients get your systems down while you’re in your day job so that on day one you’re not like oh my gosh, I have my first client and now I’m I’m working out of desperation like I have to get this right yeah, you know, I don’t have any room to kind of mess up or try to figure things out. So get all those systems down and your workflows and all that stuff. I also recommend getting all of your all the legal stuff figured out why you have your day job too. So set up your business you know your business entity get your business bank account set up like all of that kind of stuff because there can be kind of surprised fees associated with some of those things that it’s nice to have a salary to just fund that and it’s also nice just to know what to look out for so you’re not you know, taken off guard when you go day one. Yeah, and then I mean, lastly is just save as much money as you can. I lived so frugally. I mean, I pretty much continued my college lifestyle. Oh, yeah, you know, a long time and not to say that you can enjoy your life obviously dead like I traveled Good things I love to but I mean, I think just saving as much money as you can so that again, you’re not going to be on day one, getting clients out of desperation and taking every single client that comes to you and taking all the low offers you actually have some flexibility to be picky there.

Yeah, yeah, those are really good tips, processes and efficiency, something we talked about a lot. Because I remember when I took on my first time I’m like, Oh my god, what do I do now? How do I deliver this? How do I manage this project? I mean, I use a teamwork calm. Now I didn’t back when I first started. But do you use a project management platform to manage your clients? Or do you use like a manual like spreadsheets and stuff? Yeah, I

use a sauna. Very similar work. Yeah,

I like it. It’s good for me and my team. And then I use Google Drive like folders organized for everything too. So yeah, I just got an ad for teamwork the other day and I’m like, I need to check that out. So

yeah, you know, look into Yeah, I want to have give you one chance at the end to kind of like plug everything something you got coming up anything you want to tell our audience now it’d be a great time. I know I mentioned your your website Latasha James, calm. Your podcast, the freelance Friday podcast and that’s I’m assuming once every Friday, right once a week.

Yeah. Okay. The podcast comes out every Friday. I’m actually on a summer break right now. So to be season four will be starting in mid September so you can look out for that, but in the meantime, feel free to catch up on the old episodes. And yeah, I have a couple of new programs coming up in the fall to I’m going to be offering my first mastermind like group coaching. So that’s really exciting. So yeah, you’ll be able to find all the details at Latasha James, calm and all my socials are

awesome. I look forward to it. Maybe we can have you on for a follow up interview when your your mastermind comes out. Thanks so much for joining us.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our guest today. She offers fantastic insight into how she became a successful freelancer and how a freelancer can get more exposure online. You won’t want to miss this episode! Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our guest today. She offers fantastic insight into how she became a successful freelancer and how a freelancer can get more exposure online. You won’t want to miss this episode! Check her out at LatashaJames.com, she has a great YouTube channel you should follow and great … Latasha James, host of the Freelance Friday Podcast is our Guest Today Read More » Mike Volkin clean 16:06
Why do people think of freelancing as a big gamble? https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-do-people-think-of-freelancing-as-a-big-gamble/ Mon, 19 Aug 2019 15:17:20 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3571 https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-do-people-think-of-freelancing-as-a-big-gamble/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-do-people-think-of-freelancing-as-a-big-gamble/feed/ 0 Want to know why people think of freelancing as a big gamble? In today’s episode, Mike Volkin talks about the uncertainties of freelancing. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/why-do-people-think-of-freelancing-as-a-big-gamble/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Why do people think of freelancing as a big gamble?</span> Read More »</a></p> Want to know why people think of freelancing as a big gamble? In today’s episode, Mike Volkin talks about the uncertainties of freelancing.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

Welcome to Freelancer masterclass. I am Mike Volkin. Today our topic is why do people think of freelancing as a big gamble? We got this question posted on Quora. Somebody didn’t ask me directly, but they invited me to answer this question. I thought it’d be a good one because a lot of people do think freelancing is a gamble. And why is that? And then how can we fix that? Well, number one, a lot of people go into freelancing because they’re in between jobs. And they decide, you know that they want to quit their job and look for a new one, or they decide they just want to quit their job and they don’t know what to do next, or they try freelancing is to pick up a gig here and there. So that’s a gamble. All right now you can turn freelancing into a full Time job, obviously there’s a lot of people who do it. But freelancing is a gamble for other reasons as well. Anything that feels risky is a gamble. For example, one of the biggest components of freelancing is getting clients that is a gamble to most people because why you need to be good at marketing and sales in order to get clients. And guess what, most freelancers aren’t good at marketing or sales. I don’t know the first thing about it. Think about web programmers think about writers think about any other industry other than marketing and sales is really not your specialty. Okay, so in order to be able to stand out from the sea of other freelancers, it’s essentially seen as a gamble and you need to reduce the odds as they say to house odds of it being a gamble by learning, marketing and sales. Now that doesn’t mean you have to be a salesman like you see on a used car sales lot. It doesn’t mean you need to know intricate marketing techniques. That is a reason why I started Freelancer masterclass is because there are very easy Real and doable marketing and sales strategies that you can implement into your freelancing career that can get you consistent work. So I want us to do an exercise right now. And if you don’t know how to get good, consistent client work, I can’t have you just skip over this exercise or just listen to it not do anything. I literally need you to pull out a piece of paper right now and answer this question. What makes me different? I know there are billions of people on this planet and every one is unique, but honestly, you don’t need to come up with something that is completely unique to you. But what is different about me compared to the other freelancers that are trying to take business away from me? So did you write that down yet? No. I know, because it’s, it’s very hard. It’s not an easy question. If it were easy, then everybody would be doing it. Just remember that statement. If it’s easy, then everyone would be doing it. So you really need a searcher soul here because even if you might think you know the answer, you really need to let it sit. I don’t I don’t know about you. But when I think about a big decision, I like to let it dwell for at least 24 hours because there’s always other things I think about, for example, if I’m on the call with a prospect, and they asked me, Do you have any questions for me, and I might not think of something right there or think of enough questions right there. But, you know, in 24 hours, I might have five or six questions. I’m like, oh, wow, I should have asked them this. Or I should have asked him that. It’s okay to let things dwell. And just think about it. Let it let it sponge up in your mind a little bit. Let the let the neurons go crazy in your brain and just really answer that question what makes me different. So if you’re a writer, for example, you can think yourself well, what makes my skill set different what makes me unique in the fact that I can serve as clients in this niche different or better than everyone else? That’s what you need to develop your USP from your unique selling proposition. So in order to reduce freelancing being a gamble, you can develop a unique selling proposition Which when heard by prospects, they make a decision. Yeah, this is my guy. This is who I need to hire. And this is who’s right for me because they spoke my language, they address my pain points. They speak very efficiently and their experiences great like all of that comes through and your USP, your unique selling proposition. And in Freelancer masterclass, we talked about other marketing communication tactics like taglines and value props. But really, your USP is a foundation for everything. And that will develop into an elevator pitch and a value prop and a tagline and all that good stuff. But that’s when you start to kind of form your own brand. And that’s how you reduce the gamble that freelancing is because now you’re establishing a niche, a uniqueness that only you can exude that you’ve developed and now you know exactly what client to go after. And that makes everything more steady, more consistent. And you can really just go after that brand and just get good consistent work, thus reducing the gamble that Is freelancing I hope this helped a little bit. Be sure to develop your USP and ask yourself what makes you different what makes you unique, not unique out of the billions of other people but what makes you different and unique in the way you service your clients in your niche. Okay.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Want to know why people think of freelancing as a big gamble? In today’s episode, Mike Volkin talks about the uncertainties of freelancing. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brough... Want to know why people think of freelancing as a big gamble? In today’s episode, Mike Volkin talks about the uncertainties of freelancing. Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike … Why do people think of freelancing as a big gamble? Read More » Mike Volkin 5:34
How do I start freelancing with Upwork https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-start-freelancing-with-upwork/ Thu, 15 Aug 2019 16:59:04 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3563 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-start-freelancing-with-upwork/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-start-freelancing-with-upwork/feed/ 0 Show Notes How do I start freelancing with Upwork? -Start by doing a reverse search of freelancers as if you were looking for yourself-Get a great picture and test to make sure it’s great with Photofeeler.-Fill out every portion of your Upwork profile-Get a copywriter to go through it and make the verbiage great-Set up …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-do-i-start-freelancing-with-upwork/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How do I start freelancing with Upwork</span> Read More »</a></p> Show Notes

How do I start freelancing with Upwork?

-Start by doing a reverse search of freelancers as if you were looking for yourself
-Get a great picture and test to make sure it’s great with Photofeeler.
-Fill out every portion of your Upwork profile
-Get a copywriter to go through it and make the verbiage great
-Set up your RSS feeds and use the aggregated listening technique we discuss in Freelancer Masterclass.


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

It’s freelancers school time, and I am your host, Mike Volkin. Thank you for joining us on today’s podcast. We will be discussing how do I start freelancing with Upwork? to question I got in through one of our YouTube comments, and it’s a common question, so I thought I’d make an episode about it. And that’s the way we get a lot of our content ideas. So if you haven’t yet subscribed, go to our YouTube channel, subscribe to our channel and comment on some of the videos and especially let us know what type of content you would like to see us produce and this is as a result of us. Seeing one of those comments, this person wants to know, how do I start freelancing with up work? Well, that answer depends on how much experience you have as a freelancer. If you are just starting as a freelancer and just starting on up work, there’s also the option of if you’ve been freelancing for a long time and just haven’t utilized up work. But nonetheless, I will go in through through some basic tips that both of those options will encumber. First of all, I want you to start by doing a reverse search of freelancers as if you are looking for yourself as look as if you are looking to hire yourself. What I want you to do is go into your company accountant and you should create a company account because hopefully as you scale, you’re going to need to hire freelancers yourself. So with a company account, you can look for other freelancers. So if you are in design, for example, and you do specifically local Go design, I want you to go to the company account, go to find freelancers at the top, and then do a reverse search in the filters. For someone as if you’re looking for a logo designer and put in all the right filters like active within the last two weeks, greater than 90%

jobs, job success score and all that stuff that you hope to achieve by being a freelancer and Upwork you want a greater than a 90% job six six success score, you want to be logging in more than once every two weeks. So put in all that stuff as if you were trying to find yourself, then from there, you should be able to get inspiration as to what should be on your profile on talking about looking at their titles, looking at the other freelancers opening paragraph looking at their portfolio and what kind of stuff they put on there. So write down some of the the best components you see on some of those search results. That’s tip number one doing a reverse search that Next thing I want you to do is get a great picture of yourself. And don’t underestimate this. This is what makes your Upwork profile clickable on their search engines. Imagine somebody searching for a logo designer keeping with that same example. And then seeing 20 results and you have a huge amount of headspace over your head. You’re not smiling, you’re underdressed, you’re not looking at the camera that does not Garner very much clicks. So I want you to get a great picture of yourself and then go to a website called photo feeler pH Oto, f e le AR photo feeler.com and then upload that picture. People will vote on to what category they think your your picture will rank in comparison to your other pictures. So you should take a few pictures of yourself in different poses. And then in the end, you should use the one that comes out with the best results and no rank you on trustworthiness and confidence and all that stuff. That is impressive. And for your picture to be clickable. Okay, so number one, do reverse search number two, get a great picture. And number three, I want you to fill out every portion of your Upwork profile, from the job experience to the portfolios to the skills to the title, everything. I want it all filled out because a full upward profile gives you good not only good ranking on their upward job descriptions, on sorry, job Upwork search engines, but also it makes you gives you a lot of credibility that you have a lot of experience and that you care about your Upwork profile. So fill out every portion of your book profile actually spend time on it. As someone who hires a lot of freelancers on Upwork. I’ll tell you that I skipped right over those ones that don’t have a full Upwork profile. Okay, I want people I want to hire people that respect the upward platform and have taken time to go through it. Another tip is to get a copywriter. I can’t even begin to express even even writers themselves. Need copywriters to look through their profile and make sure that everything is written because no matter how many times you look at something, there’s something that is always offer could be stated differently. Sometimes you’re just too in the weeds with your own writing and you don’t realize that it doesn’t make sense from someone looking from the outside in. So get a copywriter once you’ve shorted up the best way you could, and these copywriters going to go in and make the sentences more efficient. All right. So we’re going into our last tip, but I want to quickly review, do a reverse search for freelancers, get a great picture and test it with a site like photo feeler. Fill out every portion of your Upwork profile and then get a copywriter to go through all your language. Now you’re the last tip for today is to set up your RSS feeds. And there’s this you’ll see it in there under the job search section. There’ll be a little RSS button and you can just set up your feed that way through various sites I personally like blog Trotter and but you can set up your RSS feeds, and then use the aggregated listening techniques. So basically this uses keywords of jobs that you’re interested in sticking with the same example. Its logo designers, for example, you can do what I do marketing strategy or anything related to cmo work, you know, that’s my niche. Take whatever keywords that you’re looking for that job description might have in it and set up RSS feeds of those keywords. And then the aggregated listening technique will then email your keyword search results right to your inbox. And if you don’t know what the aggregated listening technique is, you need to sign up for Freelancer masterclass, we go through it step by step, but that now you have all these opportunities being emailed to you instead of having to go check up work and search manually every time and possibly missing one or two opportunities. Alright, so I hope this helps go out and get them.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe to get the link updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Show Notes How do I start freelancing with Upwork? -Start by doing a reverse search of freelancers as if you were looking for yourself-Get a great picture and test to make sure it’s great with Photofeeler.-Fill out every portion of your Upwork profile-... Show Notes How do I start freelancing with Upwork? -Start by doing a reverse search of freelancers as if you were looking for yourself-Get a great picture and test to make sure it’s great with Photofeeler.-Fill out every portion of your Upwork profile-Get a copywriter to go through it and make the verbiage great-Set up … How do I start freelancing with Upwork Read More » Mike Volkin 7:14
As a freelancer how do you deal with the lack of job security https://freelancermasterclass.com/as-a-freelancer-how-do-you-deal-with-the-lack-of-job-security/ Mon, 12 Aug 2019 16:23:30 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3553 https://freelancermasterclass.com/as-a-freelancer-how-do-you-deal-with-the-lack-of-job-security/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/as-a-freelancer-how-do-you-deal-with-the-lack-of-job-security/feed/ 0 How do you deal with the lack of freelance job security? Show notes You actually have more job security than an 8-5 job. You can work anywhere, at any time with any amount of clients. • Be proactive with prospecting• Work hard on client retention• Work on my skillsets, make sure I have a diverse …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/as-a-freelancer-how-do-you-deal-with-the-lack-of-job-security/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">As a freelancer how do you deal with the lack of job security</span> Read More »</a></p> How do you deal with the lack of freelance job security?

Show notes

You actually have more job security than an 8-5 job. You can work anywhere, at any time with any amount of clients.

• Be proactive with prospecting
• Work hard on client retention
• Work on my skillsets, make sure I have a diverse array of skillsets
• Focus on always growing my network
• Prepare for dry spells but also work at minimizing them
• Push your limits, never be happy to where you’re at


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin

uni hope you’re having a great day. It’s another episode of Freelancer school. I am your host, Mike Volkin, lead instructor of Freelancer masterclass calm. Today we’re going to be talking about how you as a freelancer deal with the lack of job security. This is a big one. And this is the reason why a lot of freelancers aren’t full time. A vast majority are part time they in fact a very common name for freelancers, someone who likes to quote unquote, side hustle. Let’s try to change that. Okay, we want more freelancers full time because it is the best job in the world. If you have job security now I’ll tell you though, before I start answering the question of how a freelancer deals with job security, I would like to just say for the record, that actually you have more job security as a freelancer, then you do at an eight to five job What do investors always talk about? They always talk about diversity, right the importance of diversifying your portfolio Well, the reason why they do that is for security because when if you have one single stock and that stock, takes a tumble and goes down to nothing or next to nothing, then you are left with nothing, that stock Same thing with a salary job, you know, you go to one job every day. And then if you lose that job, guess what? You’re unemployed until you can hopefully find another job. But with freelancing, the very definition of a freelancer is being able to serve as many clients at once. You don’t have to worry about losing one particular job because you have several ongoing at once you are more diverse. So you actually in that case, have more job security. An eight to five job. You can work anywhere. You can work at any time. And you can work with any amount of clients that by definition is diversity. So you can actually have more job security being a freelancer. With that said though, let’s go ahead and answer the question that was posed for today’s podcast as a freelancer, how do you deal with the lack of job security? Knowing that you really don’t have job security as a freelancer? Let’s go ahead and answer it anyway. If you want to be more secure as a freelancer, what you should do is be proactive with prospecting, too many freelancers just stop prospecting when they have enough clients, but you should always save an hour to have every day at a minimum, to prospect for new clients to cover those dry spells that you will inevitably have as a freelancer. And you should also work hard on client retention, you know, it’s 19 times harder to find a new client than to keep an existing one. And those are That is stats that have been done based on various studies 19 times more difficult. So when you talk about the importance of client retention, it should be of paramount importance for you to do so. So in order to keep clients longer you should one vet them better so that you know they’re a great fit and number to service them the best that you can have good tools have put in place to be efficient and proactive with their needs. And with servicing them. So work hard and client retention. We have a couple classes at Freelancer masterclass about client retention and how to keep clients up to five times longer. We’ve had students say, Mike my my average client before I went to Freelancer masterclass was two months and now it’s 10. So, keeping those stats in your business is important so you can see those improvements. Another tip for how to do a job security as a freelancer or the lack thereof is to work on your skill sets. Make sure you have a diverse array of skill sets. So if you want job security and you can only work for on SEO for Example, then maybe look into some other aspects of marketing that you’re interested in. So instead of just being able to serve as one client for one particular job, you can service that client for an array of different jobs, thus being able to keep clients longer, thus having more job security. Okay. Let’s do another one. Another tip, focus on always growing your network, you know, job security, and freelancing is all about your network. Who do you know how many people can you get to talk to every week or every day or every month however you want to measure it? Growing your network is a primary importance to you if you’re a freelancer, because your network those people who know you or have heard of you or your brand, whatever your your company name is, those are the people that are most likely to hire you rather than someone cold that has never heard of you before. So if you want to make a goal to friend a few people every week or every day on LinkedIn, always be growing your network. So every time you post to LinkedIn, you might be reaching out, that post might be reaching out to say 500 people as opposed to five people.

And always what you want to do is prepare for dry spells as a freelancer, but you always want to work at minimizing them. So that’s another tip to, you know, deal with the lack of job security is to minimize dry spells. It seems that every year at a certain time of the year and maybe even a certain season, people will contact me and say, I’m dry with work. Do you have any referrals? For me that kind of thing? really depends on what industry they’re in as a freelancer depends on what time of the year the work might be slow. But if you know when those dry spells are coming, then you should load up beforehand with potential clients. So think of it like a squirrel trying to get acorns, they know The Winter’s coming, they load up with acorns. And and now they’re they’re free to eat as much as they want because they have a stockpile of acorns, right. Same thing. Same thing with freelancers. If you know you have a dry spell coming, you can actually see it with the winding down a various work with clients, or, you know, there are certain seasons coming up. I have a particular Freelancer that’s very successful, but he 90% of his work is in the fourth quarter because he works on e commerce promotions. And you know, ecommerce promotions are huge in the fourth quarter, that’s when most e commerce sales are made. But other than that, he’s really just prospecting for work and trying to get the biggest and best clients during those other three quarters. But 90% of his income comes from that fourth quarter. So he is just ready when that fourth quarter comes with clients. These are you know, to go back to our earlier analogy, he’s already got all those acorns as a squirrel. Okay, so prepare for dry spells, by minimizing them. And then another tip, the last tip I’ll give you today for dealing with a lack of job security as a freelancer is to push your limits you know, never be happy where you’re at. I have freelancers all the time saying Mike, what can I do to make 100,000 and then when they make 100,000 they’re like, Okay, well, I made hundred thousand, you know, thanks a lot. It’s like Why aren’t you freaking out and asked me what you can do to make a quarter million a year. And then once you’re at a quarter million, what about a third of a million like, keep pushing your limits, and it might not just be about revenue, it could be about the number of clients you can handle. Given the efficiency, Mike, I want to see how many clients I can handle in an eight hour day, I rarely I think I’ve gotten that maybe twice in my 15 plus years of freelancing, everybody always seems to talk about revenue. But really, efficiency is just as important as a metric you should be measuring as well. push your limits, never be happy where you’re at where you’re at. So even though it might appear that freelancers have a lack of job security, they actually have more, but there’s a way to minimize any effects of any lack of job security by using the tips that I just taught you today. Okay, good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing Master class.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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How do you deal with the lack of freelance job security? Show notes You actually have more job security than an 8-5 job. You can work anywhere, at any time with any amount of clients. • Be proactive with prospecting• Work hard on client retention• Work... How do you deal with the lack of freelance job security? Show notes You actually have more job security than an 8-5 job. You can work anywhere, at any time with any amount of clients. • Be proactive with prospecting• Work hard on client retention• Work on my skillsets, make sure I have a diverse … As a freelancer how do you deal with the lack of job security Read More » Mike Volkin 8:05
What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing? https://freelancermasterclass.com/whats-been-your-biggest-setback-in-freelancing/ Thu, 08 Aug 2019 19:20:00 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3503 https://freelancermasterclass.com/whats-been-your-biggest-setback-in-freelancing/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/whats-been-your-biggest-setback-in-freelancing/feed/ 0 What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing? Show Notes Not getting paid. To mitigate this: Clear scope of work Very tight contract showing remedies for non-payment (i.e. binding arbitration, late fees, etc.) Collect at least 50% up front, no exceptions (try for 100%) Provide an EASY way of getting paid Pick up the phone but …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/whats-been-your-biggest-setback-in-freelancing/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing?</span> Read More »</a></p> What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing?

Show Notes

Not getting paid. To mitigate this:

  • Clear scope of work
  • Very tight contract showing remedies for non-payment (i.e. binding arbitration, late fees, etc.)
  • Collect at least 50% up front, no exceptions (try for 100%)
  • Provide an EASY way of getting paid
  • Pick up the phone but recap all verbal conversations in writing
  • Send a certified letter
  • End the relationship

Also, false reviews

  • Respond immediately both to the client and the platform where the review was left.

 


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Welcome to another episode of Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin. And today we’re going to be talking about what has been your biggest setback in freelancing. I got asked this on a Cora question the other day and I wanted to address it since I think so many of you either have experienced it or will experience it in the future. First of all, I would say that there’s two main problems, not just one, my biggest setback has been not getting paid. And I’ll give you some tips on how to mitigate this but another setback I have is false reviews. Let’s go ahead and talk about false reviews first, reviews are a necessary Evil in some cases where you get a bad review and it just drags you down from tons of future income. But in some cases, in most cases, it can be great for you because positive reviews really prop you up. Not only do they help in the Upwork algorithms, lots of great reviews, but it helps when prospects look at these reviews and see that you have lots of good experience working with our clients and positive experience. But every now and then you’ll get either a false review or a bad review. The difference between the two is that a bad review may or may not be justified, a false review is not justified. Let me give you an example. I had a freelancer who I was thinking about hiring and I decided not to they followed up with me later after the project was done and asked me he said Mike, why did you not hire me I we had a great conversation. And I was if anything overqualified for the job and I said, I know I saw a review on you know, a scathing review on your Upwork feed that’s on your Apple profile that had all those negative points about and i and i just resonated with me. And she said you do know that was for a different Freelancer right? I said No, you know what I’m on your profile right now I can see it. He’s like, I know, she said, but my my profile, the client had left the review for intending it to be for someone else. And because they were hiring multiple freelancers, so it wasn’t supposed to be on my profile. And I’m working with Upwork to get it removed, and the client is, you know, working with me to make sure that that happens. I said, Well, I wish you would have told me that in the first place because that is a false review. And that was a four and a half thousand dollar project. I wound up hiring someone else for that that person missed out on. That is just one example. I can’t imagine all the other false reviews that are on Google and you know, if you google your name and see an unjustified review, then that would be an issue I did have an issue with a false review wants but gotta quickly removed where I don’t think anybody noticed it. Although that is not a setback for me, it is a setback for a lot of freelancers. So I just wanted to bring that up. And in dealing with false reviews and even bad reviews, because everybody’s going to get bad reviews no matter how great you are. In a bad review could be as little as a forced out of five stars, what I consider a bad review is four to five. To deal with bad reviews, you want to do two things. Number one, you want to respond immediately on the platform, which it’s on. So if you see a bad review on Google or Bing or up work, you want to respond immediately and publicly. And in a professional way, but and you also want to respond to the client to do whatever you can to get it removed. Because bad reviews affect you more than you know, they’re there forever. And anybody can see them, and they’re bad for your brand. So please try to get those removed as soon as possible and respond publicly. Now let’s talk about not getting paid. There are some steps that you can do to mitigate not getting paid as a freelancer and unfortunately, almost everybody has been freelancing. can experience not getting paid either partially or fully for a project? First of all, you should have a very clear scope of work before you even begin working with a client. I’m talking about excruciating Lee clear. It’s not just Hey, I’m going to do three blogs for you at 800 words or more. If you’re a freelance writer, for example, it has to be much more fleshed out than that everything from the timeline to the details of the blog

needs to be fleshed out with the client and agreed upon in writing. Very, very clear scope of work. I can’t stress that enough. I work so hard on making sure that the scope of work is so clear, not just for not getting paid, but also for the fact that you’re going to want to prevent scope creep. scope creep is when a client asks you to do something that is outside the scope of the work of the contract and it costs you time and doesn’t you don’t get paid for it usually. The next tip is having a tight contract. That shows remedies for non payment. So you always want to have a clause in your contract you’re working agreement for what’s called binding arbitration. Maybe something that has to do with late fees, I always recommend late fees in your contract. Going back to binding arbitration, there are several different types of arbitration. But binding arbitration is one that is enforced outside of the court system. So the two parties will come to an agreement with an arbitrator in the room. And that is an enforceable by law as opposed to a non binding arbitration where the judgment is honored between the two parties, but not enforceable by law. So you want something with binding arbitration if not just skip arbitration altogether. Arbitration is easier for both parties in most cases, because you don’t have to go through the court system and which takes time and cost money, although binding arbitration can, in fact, in some cases cost more than going to court, but it’s more Much less complicated than going through the court system. So always have a very tight contract showing remedies for non payment if you’re a freelancer masterclass student premium member, you will get those those agreements. Another tip for not getting paid, or actually for getting paid faster or more frequently collect at least 50% up front, no exceptions. I always try to get 100% of the money up front. If it’s a short term contract, meaning for me three months or less, especially one month or less, you should always get 100% up front. But if it’s something that’s ongoing, recurring, you should be able to bill at the beginning of the month as opposed to in arrears, which is the end of the month, but always try to get at least 50% up front. I don’t have many clients who haven’t paid me but the ones I did all have the same commonality as I did not collect money up front. Now. It’s an absolute requirement that I do that before working with a client, no matter how much I liked them, no matter how polite They are, okay.

Provide an easy way of getting paid. So

many times I work with freelancers, especially ones that are international, and they provide these crazy ways to get paid out to sign up for this system called pay Payoneer and I’ve never heard it before. So then I sign up and then have to get validated and then I have to get something signed by a notary and then come back. It’s like these crazy steps just to pay you You know what, sign up for something that’s easy for the client. That takes little to no time. That way, if I’m the one paying a freelancer, I don’t have to think about it. I know it’s not going to be a hassle and I can do it right now. Instead of having to like flag that email to say please pay this invoice knowing that it’s going to be an issue later. All right. So make it super easy for someone to get paid whether you’re there in your country or or outside your country.

Yes, there are going to be fees associated with that.

Those should be built into your costs. Too many times I hear about freelancers, moaning about oh 3% credit card fees. You know what build that in. It’s nothing. You get to keep 97 percent of it. And it’s, it’s a luxury to get to be able to take payments electronically believe me it was hasn’t been that many decades where you had to send checks and or send credit card numbers by fax or some weird thing. So now it’s super easy to accept payment, just take care of it and build a fee into your hourly rate. Okay. Another tip for mitigating on clients paying you is picking up the phone and calling them and trying to resolve any payments disputes. Sometimes with emails, it’s difficult with the tone of the voice or way something might be stated, that might be taken in a different direction. It’s all people are always nicer on the phone.

So pick up the phone, call the client,

but always recap all the verbal conversations in writing in case if there ever is an issue. I had actually dealt with this issue with a client where a client was just refusing to pay me for something. And it turns out when I got him on the phone, it was a giant miscommunication. They said that they weren’t going to pay me for something that I didn’t deliver. But I delivered it to them. And for some reason they skipped over that particular email. It was marked as read. I even had an email tracker that showed when they read it and how many times they read it and how long they looked

at the email the whole thing.

So I showed them this via screen share, and we went into their email live, and I saw that it was red, and they apologized profusely, and then they paid me right away, that would have never been resolved, just doing email communication. All right, there’s just one example.

So it’s always helps to pick up the phone and situations like that.

Lastly, actually, secondly, lastly, send a certified letter. If it comes to the point where the client is you guys are just at an impasse and they’re just not paying you you have to send a certified demand letter certified meetings, they somebody at their establishment, their home or their office has signed for it and is personally responsible for giving them the letter. They’ve actually signed it and that signature will come back to you in the mail. That’s what certified is. cost a couple bucks, but that way It is showing you showing them and you that you’re demanding payment. This puts any excuse out of their hands if it ever comes to court arbitration that they didn’t know you’re asking for payment. That’s a typical cop out. Oh, I didn’t know I forgot I sent payment. I didn’t know they didn’t have it. If you send a demand letter with their signature on it, they know that you did not receive payment. And lastly, and the relationship Oh my God, I had a freelancer their day was telling me how their client didn’t pay for the second time. And I was like, what, why? How does that even possible? Why did you not end the relationship after the first time they didn’t pay? Oh, well, they call me they apologize. They really needed me to fix their website again. And I decided to take on work and just bill in the past to payment to this last invoice. And guess what the client took off on them again, went dark on them. So if they don’t, you know, Fool me once, shame on you fool me twice. Shame on me. Alright, so don’t work with a client. Again, who doesn’t pay the first time? Alright, so hope these tips help you. Hopefully you won’t have to deal with any of these issues but if you do you know the steps to take to mitigate not getting paid.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing? Show Notes Not getting paid. To mitigate this: Clear scope of work Very tight contract showing remedies for non-payment (i.e. binding arbitration, late fees, etc.) Collect at least 50% up front, What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing? Show Notes Not getting paid. To mitigate this: Clear scope of work Very tight contract showing remedies for non-payment (i.e. binding arbitration, late fees, etc.) Collect at least 50% up front, no exceptions (try for 100%) Provide an EASY way of getting paid Pick up the phone but … What’s been your biggest setback in freelancing? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 11:31
Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income https://freelancermasterclass.com/easy-ways-to-increase-freelance-income/ Wed, 07 Aug 2019 17:43:52 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3497 https://freelancermasterclass.com/easy-ways-to-increase-freelance-income/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/easy-ways-to-increase-freelance-income/feed/ 0 Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income Show notes: Raise your rates Cross/upsell Increase your productivity 25% Live and die by your calendar and put (prospecting) goals in your calendar Be more niche than you are now Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/easy-ways-to-increase-freelance-income/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income</span> Read More »</a></p> Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income

Show notes:

  • Raise your rates
  • Cross/upsell
  • Increase your productivity 25%
  • Live and die by your calendar and put (prospecting) goals in your calendar
  • Be more niche than you are now

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

And welcome to another episode of Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin, your host. Today we’re going to be talking about easy ways to increase freelance income. Now, let’s start with the most obvious Okay, raising your rates. You might think Mike, I don’t need to listen to a podcast or somebody to tell me to raise my rates. But I’ll tell you I’ve been working with some freelancers for years and they just haven’t raised their rates. And there is a point at which you raise your rate and you’ll lose business you’ll notice when you’ve raised your rate too high, but don’t be afraid if you’re building 20 or 30 or even $100 an hour to go up and other 10% and test to See if the number of prospects you’re closing, your close rate is staying the same or even maybe increasing like it did for me it increased. So you should always document whenever you have a discovery call or a prospecting call with a potential new client, to documents statistics, meaning if I get on the phone with 10 people, how many of them actually become clients. So you know, when it’s time to raise your rate, that if the conversion of those prospects increase, meaning you’re closing more even staying the same, that your new rate has held water, so you can actually start building at that new rate with the same effectiveness. That’s why it’s always important to keep stats. So the first tip I’m going to give you is raise your rates. But in order to do that, you need to be able to keep stats on your business. So you can make a simple spreadsheet that says you know, number of calls taken in one column and the next column is number of calls closed and in the third column, simply just a percentage of column a verse column B. And again, if they say the same or increase, then you’ll know that that rate is holding. Another way that a freelancer can increase their income is to cross or upsell. Too often do I see freelancers saying I only do this, I only do on page SEO and that’s all I do. I don’t do off page SEO. I don’t do local SEO or ecommerce, SEO, I just do on page SEO. But if you have a more diverse skill set, you can increase your income because you have more billable hours by being able to service a client more with their needs. So be sure to cross sell or upsell. Okay.

increase your productivity 25%. Now, a lot of people don’t understand how much time they waste during the day, checking their email every minute checking social media, doing something that’s inefficient or repetitive. If you can think of all the things you do on a daily basis And then how much time that is towards billable hour, you will be surprised at how little little time that you have actually servicing clients, then you should. So as a good exercise tomorrow, what I would like you to do is document how much time you spend not billing hours to clients, and what that time was spent on. So every 15 minutes, I want you to keep a little, I don’t know a piece of paper by your mouse pad. If you haven’t on your computer, you’ll get distracted the file get buried, it won’t get done. Pull out a piece of paper, write on it every 15 minutes. Maybe you have a timer something on your smartphone app or on your smartphone have an app for a timer every 15 minutes is going to go off and you’re going to think what did I do the last 15 minutes. Okay, well, I only service clients for five minutes and then I checked my email twice. I looked at my Instagram feed and then I posted something on Facebook you got to write all that stuff down. Okay, and the at the end ended at the end of the day. You’ll see that Oh wow. I spent almost missed an hour on Instagram today looking to see what my cousin had for breakfast and what my friend had for this did this weekend, you know how, how much time that actually wasted? What you want to do is you want to think of a way to make yourself 25% more efficient. Okay, if you do that, you’ll have more time to increase your income because you have more billable hours. All right. And the fourth tip I’ll give you so so far we’ve had raise your rates, cross sell or upsell, increase your productivity. And now this tip is to live and die by your calendar. If you use your calendar as a golden rule, meaning to not have any interruptions by what your calendar states, meaning if you’re going to be at the gym from 10 to 11 every day that’s on your calendar and that’s what you’ll be there’s no exceptions barring some kind of family or health emergency. If you make that rule that your calendar is king, and then you put goals in that calendar You will be amazed at how many goals you can accomplish in your life. So if you’re putting prospecting goals, for example, meaning I want to reach out and make 10 new contacts a day on LinkedIn, and you put a half an hour a day to prospect on LinkedIn, you know, by the end of the week, you have 70 new contacts on LinkedIn like that would that that’s a hard rule because you’re making your small bite sized goals every day. And that’s a great way to increase your freelance income is to live and die by account or some other mechanism to where goals are written. And they are understood that if they’re on your calendar, that they are they absolutely have to be done barring any emergency. And my last rule for today, to increase your freelance income is to be more niche than you are now. So let’s say that you’re a writer that works in the transportation industry. Maybe you can work only with luxury cars now you’re not might think, Mike, that is not going to work because Now that reduces the amount of clientele that I can possibly work for. Well, actually, that is natural to think that, but it’s the opposite of what will happen you’ll see that more people in this case the luxury car market will come and talk to you because you specialize in their very specific field. When if you just do the transportation industry, you might be going up against hundreds of other bloggers that can provide the same service seemingly to the client, they might not be able to see your value up front. And you probably won’t close nearly as many deals as if you would, with someone with a very specific niche comes to you and they can see your expertise in that very specific niche right away. Okay, so I hope these tips helped. Good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income Show notes: Raise your rates Cross/upsell Increase your productivity 25% Live and die by your calendar and put (prospecting) goals in your calendar Be more niche than you are now Raw Transcript Get ready for freel... Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income Show notes: Raise your rates Cross/upsell Increase your productivity 25% Live and die by your calendar and put (prospecting) goals in your calendar Be more niche than you are now Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you … Easy Ways to Increase Freelance Income Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:01
How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-100000-year-as-a-freelancer/ Tue, 06 Aug 2019 21:08:44 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3485 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-100000-year-as-a-freelancer/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-100000-year-as-a-freelancer/feed/ 0 How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer Don’t rely on referrals Don’t race to the lowest price Start with your yearly salary divided by 2080 and that’s your goal, so $100k = $48.08/hour Now go 30% over because assume you have to prospect and you won’t’ get every hour of every day filled, so charge …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-make-100000-year-as-a-freelancer/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer</span> Read More »</a></p> How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer

  • Don’t rely on referrals
  • Don’t race to the lowest price
  • Start with your yearly salary divided by 2080 and that’s your goal, so $100k = $48.08/hour
  • Now go 30% over because assume you have to prospect and you won’t’ get every hour of every day filled, so charge 30% more than that, so $62.50/hour
  • Now get clients. You need $8,333/month to make $100k/year, so you’ll need 4 clients a month paying you $2,083 on average. Assume that you can hold a client for 3 months on average, this means you’ll need 16 clients a year. Assume your conversion from phone call to a client is 1:3, that means you’ll need to talk to 48 people. Now get on Upwork and get 48 people on the phone with you! If you can’t do that try other avenues (social media (LinkedIn), PPC, inbound marketing, etc)

Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Welcome to another episode

of Freelancer school. I am Mike Volkin. Today we’re going to be answering the age old question. How do I make $100,000 a year as a freelancer? I don’t know why I get this question all the time. And I don’t know why $100,000 is used as a benchmark because, you know, frankly, it’s really not that hard to make $100,000. as a freelancer, all you need is a little bit of expertise and a little bit of know how, and then a little bit of persistence and $100,000 can be easily reached. But for some reason $100,000 maybe it’s because just a nice round number. It’s a nice six figure round number. But I get this question every single week. If Not more than that. So I just want to break down the math and show you what it takes to make $100,000 as a freelancer so you can see how attainable It really is. But first of all, before I start breaking down the math, I want to talk to you about realistically what it would take from a business practice standpoint. First of all,

I know a lot of freelancers, too many

that rely on referrals. And it’s really hard to make $100,000 a year consistently relying on referrals. Many people actually become a freelancer because they get a referral or two and then drop out very quickly having to get another job because they didn’t realize that hey, the referrals aren’t going to be very consistent. You cannot rely on referrals and make $100,000 a year consistently unless you are very well connected. Another tip is don’t race to be the lowest price leader. It’s so easy and common to know that there’s other freelancers bidding on the same job that you are especially on these platforms like up work and freelancer. They encourage multiple freelancers to submit bids. And then to think that clients really only care about money in terms of being the lowest priced freelancer. That is not what clients care about, at least the ones that you want. So don’t be chasing the lowest price. You don’t have to offer your services for $8 an hour and try to compete with India or the Philippines or something. You’ll never make a good living and you’ll never like freelancing, if that’s the case, that

is if you’re in the US.

Another tip is start with your yearly salary and divide it by 2080. So where does that number come from? 2080 is a normal amount of work hours in a year. In this case, we’re using $100,000 as a benchmark.

So if you divide $100,000 divided

by 2080, which is the work hours per year, you actually have $48 and eight cents an hour that doesn’t seem that unrealistic that somebody would pay you $48 and eight cents per hour for something that you are a specialist at. But this is what I want you to do. Because it’s not just like a full time salary job, you just go to work and you’re going to get paid from minute one, you have to consider all the other stuff as a freelancer you have to do to maintain your business. So if we’re at $48, and eight cents an hour, and we want to go 30% over, we’re now at $62 and 50 cents an hour, which is still very reasonable. Now it’s time to get clients. Let’s figure out if we have $100,000 as a goal, that means we’re going to divide that by 12. To get the month that means we need $8,333 a month in order to make that hundred thousand dollars a year. So you’re going to need four clients a month paying you 2083 on average, where’d I get that number I just divided 8033 by four $8,333 divided by fours 2083. So you’ll need four clients a month, paying you $2,083 on average. Now assuming you can hold a client for about three On average, and if you can’t and that’s a problem, okay? There’s something wrong with your service or your work. If you can’t hold a client for three months or your or your clients, there’s, there’s something wrong with the way that you’re the type of client that you’re attracting, okay? But you should be able to hold a client for three months. So assuming that’s an average, that means you need 16 clients a year. Okay, so four clients a month, you can hold a client for three months on average. That means you need 16 clients a year to make $100,000. Now, let’s assume that your conversion from phone call to client that means Hi, my name is Mr. Freelancer or Mrs. Freelancer don’t need to be sexist here. You get them on the phone. Here’s my services. I like you a lot. You’d like me this is a good fit bone. Let’s sign agreement. Let’s go. That conversion rate is 123. So assuming that you’ve got your pitch down, you’ve got your USP which we teach you about and Freelancer masterclass. You got all that down and they can’t possibly say no, because you’re such a great guy or girl that you can close one out Every three prospects you get on the phone. That means to get 16 clients a year, you’ll need to talk to 48 people in one year, that’s 365 days, all you need to do is talk to 48 people. Where’d I get 48? Well, you just multiplied 16 times three, because your call ratio to close this 123. Okay? So now what I want you to do to get those 48 people on the phone is get on Upwork get on Freelancer get on these platforms where these jobs are just ready and waiting for you. Get them on the phone with you. And if you can’t do that, or you don’t want to do that, then try other avenues. There’s lots of other avenues what what in freelancers do before Upwork was here. They use LinkedIn and social media and paper click and inbound marketing techniques. There’s tons of ways to get clients. It’s just there’s almost too many ways in this connected world. It’s there’s so many ways that you can almost lose yourself by diluting yourself with too many activities. So you want to stay focused on one get really good at it and then get a pattern down and then really Repeat and get another pattern. So now you eventually just build up so many clients you’re picking and choosing which ones you want to work with. So what I asked you that when you ask me the question of how do I make $100,000 a year freelancing? That’s the answer I would give you is you gotta backtrack, dad. Okay, 2018 hours, that means $48 and eight cents 30% upcharge to cover various hours of your time that you’re not going to be filling servicing clients. That you know, that’s, that’s $62 and 50 cents an hour and then your close ratio, that means you’ll need 48 people to get on a phone with you, and then you to start prospecting. And that’s really much, you know, you just break it down into simpler components. And that’s how easy it is to make $100,000 a year. as a freelancer. I

hope this helps. Have a good day.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer Don’t rely on referrals Don’t race to the lowest price Start with your yearly salary divided by 2080 and that’s your goal, so $100k = $48.08/hour Now go 30% over because assume you have to prospect and you won’... How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer Don’t rely on referrals Don’t race to the lowest price Start with your yearly salary divided by 2080 and that’s your goal, so $100k = $48.08/hour Now go 30% over because assume you have to prospect and you won’t’ get every hour of every day filled, so charge … How to Make $100,000/Year as a Freelancer Read More » Mike Volkin clean 7:09
How to Double Your Freelancing Rate NOW! https://freelancermasterclass.com/double-your-freelancing-rate/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 16:33:51 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3464 https://freelancermasterclass.com/double-your-freelancing-rate/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/double-your-freelancing-rate/feed/ 0 In this post, I will show you how to double your freelancing rate in the easiest possible way. I will give you several tips and examples. The more you adopt into your daily business practices, the better chances you have to double your freelancing rate. Before you learn to increase your rate at all, you …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/double-your-freelancing-rate/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Double Your Freelancing Rate NOW!</span> Read More »</a></p> In this post, I will show you how to double your freelancing rate in the easiest possible way. I will give you several tips and examples. The more you adopt into your daily business practices, the better chances you have to double your freelancing rate.

Before you learn to increase your rate at all, you have to first ask “Is my freelancing rate accurate?”, “Am I charging too much now?”, “Am I charging too little now?” Let’s move forward with these questions first, because there is no need to double your rate if it’s wrong in the first place.

How Can I Charge the Most Amount of Money and Provide the Most Value?

Is your freelancing rate even accurate? I did a podcast about how to determine your rate, check it out. Once you determine what you should be charging, you can now move forward with how to charge more by providing more value.

There are two main tips I would like to share with you about charging more and providing more value.

First, in order to charge more, you need to provide more value, so make a list of things you can do BEFORE you charge a client that will show your value.

————————–

“In order to charge more, you need to provide more value.”

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  • For example. If you’re a designer, perhaps send watermarked samples to the client before charging a prospect. This will show off your skill set and not allow the client to use your work until it’s paid for.
  • If you’re a digital marketer or UX specialist, perhaps do a website review for a prospect.
  • Personally, I do a great discovery call where I show them I am an expert at strategy. I spend a few minutes researching the company and already have a list of suggestions for improvement for them.

The more valuable you are before they higher you, the more you can charge.

Second, don’t bill hourly, bill per project. If you have done a similar project in the past for a client and this new prospect wants virtually the same task done, you can use your existing work as a base. For example, content strategy is very similar from client to client. I created one complete content strategy for a client many years ago and now each time I have to create a new one, I just use that first strategy as a “base”. it’s 80% the same, but it’s unique to the client. In cases like these, bill per project. This way you are able to charge as if you made it from scratch, the clients get the value of a perfectly fleshed out and fresh project and you get to reap the rewards of spending less time on the project than you thought. So, a project that would have taken 10 hours, now takes 3, but you’re billing for what you would normally charge someone 10 hours for. Yes, I am telling my client this is a content plan I have used before but it would be unique to them, don’t hide that fact. But in this situation, I am spending less time and the client is spending less money. It’s a win-win.

The more you can help a client, the more they will pay you. So, identify problems upfront, even before the prospect knows about it. So instead of just saying “I can help you write this blog”, say “I can help you format it, code it for HTML, publish and distribute it.”

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“The more you can help a client, the more they will pay you.”

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All of the above tips should definitely help you instantly increase your pay.

To Double Your Freelancing Rate, You Really Need to…

Get outside your comfort zone. Most freelancers, and most people in fact, don’t like to go outside their comfort zone. Just remember, unless you get lucky, nothing in business comes easy. If it were easy, everyone would be doing it! Do you think most people spend their day working 8 am-5 pm Monday through Friday in a cubicle because they want to? Do you think most people like to ask permission to go on vacation? Hell no! They do it because they like the perceived security blanket of an 8 am-5 pm job and a steady paycheck. Those are the people who work for people LIKE YOU! The entrepreneurs, the 3% of people who go outside their comfort zone, take risks and are willing to reap the rewards of their creative and risk-taking labor.

Look at Elon Musk, when he arrived in North America, he had a budget of 1$ a day and survived by buying food in bulk. Now that’s extreme, but you have to admit, there isn’t anything comfortable about that. Personally, I am an admitted introvert. I love being on stage, but in a crowded room at a party, no thanks. I had to force myself to network offline to make some contacts as a freelancer. I did it to force myself to come outside my comfort zone. Too often freelancers rely on one or two types of marketing channels for work. That is a recipe for failure on so many levels.

A good exercise is to write down all the marketing channels you can do. I write about some of the ways to find freelance jobs online here.  Research some offline ways to find freelance jobs too. Some examples are networking at meetup events, going to conferences, etc. Once you have a list that mixes online and offline ways to find freelance jobs, simply prioritize them by interest. So if you have 10 ideas, write them down in order from top to bottom, the ones at the top you have the most interest. Now, take your number 1 and number 10 choice and do them at the same time. This way you are mixing your favorite and least favorite. Try those for a while then move on to number 2 and number 9.

This method allows you to always be working on a task you like and a task you don’t like. I take a similar approach at the gym. I will do an exercise I really like and then one I don’t like. It works great and allows you to expand your horizons and get outside your comfort zone.

Now go out there and double your freelancing rate! If you haven’t yet, check out our Masterclass course and start building toward your goals. Share this article and comment below on some tips you have to either charge more or provide more value to your clients.

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In this post, I will show you how to double your freelancing rate in the easiest possible way. I will give you several tips and examples. The more you adopt into your daily business practices, the better chances you have to double your freelancing rate... In this post, I will show you how to double your freelancing rate in the easiest possible way. I will give you several tips and examples. The more you adopt into your daily business practices, the better chances you have to double your freelancing rate. Before you learn to increase your rate at all, you … How to Double Your Freelancing Rate NOW! Read More » Mike Volkin clean 6:27
How to Double Your Freelancing Hourly Rate https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-double-your-freelancing-hourly-rate/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 15:40:15 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=3451 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-double-your-freelancing-hourly-rate/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-double-your-freelancing-hourly-rate/feed/ 0 People come to me and ask how they can double their hourly rate. This inquiry is what I will be discussing in this blog. I don’t know if what you charge right now is right or not, but if you wish to double your freelancing rate, continue reading. Increasing your hourly rate has nothing to …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-double-your-freelancing-hourly-rate/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Double Your Freelancing Hourly Rate</span> Read More »</a></p> People come to me and ask how they can double their hourly rate. This inquiry is what I will be discussing in this blog. I don’t know if what you charge right now is right or not, but if you wish to double your freelancing rate, continue reading.

Increasing your hourly rate has nothing to do with saving money or, or getting better projects or different projects. These tips will teach you how to double the amount of money you’re currently charging your prospects.

Provide More Value

Create a list of things you can do before you charge a client that will show your value. I have a designer that sends watermark samples over before they charge the clients. I know a UX guy, a User Experience guy, who does website reviews for clients. If you’re into UX, what you do best is enhancing the flow of a user’s experience on a website, a good way to provide value to show your expertise is a website review of the current prospects’ website.

I do a great discovery call where I show them that I’m an expert marketing strategist. I call them, and I’ll talk through what their issue is, what they need, and how I can help. I do this for 30 minutes to an hour; it depends whether the prospect gets engaged with my discussion. I don’t feel like I’m selling anything, but I’m showing them that I have value.

When you show them that you have more value than what they expect, you are giving them reasons why it’s justifiable to ask for a higher rate.

Don’t Bill Hourly, Bill Per Project

Scope out the entire process of whatever this person is hiring you for. For instance, if a prospect wants to hire you to write a specific agreement, ask for per-project payment. This way, you prevent scope creep. It means that you make the client aware that he cannot throw in any task that has nothing to do with your job description. If you charge per hour, the client can give you any responsibility because you’re getting paid for doing it anyway. Charging per project is like telling your client, “you know what, regardless of how long this takes me, I can do this for x amount of money.”

This strategy can pay off because if you’re the type of person that works fast or is very good at your trade, you can get more projects done within a day. So, a client might think I spend 10 or 20 hours doing a project, when in fact I spend only two or three hours doing it. Is that ripping them off? No, because if they went anywhere else, they would end up paying more for the same, or even inferior quality of output.

Go Outside Your Comfort Zone

Try some prospecting methods that you’re not used to. Always do prospecting, no matter what. Put this on your calendar and force yourself to live and die by your schedule. Then try a new prospecting technique every week until you find something that works for you. If you’re not used to LinkedIn, then try it. Find 50 people a day that are potential prospects. Or, do the warm calling, sign up for a freelancer platform like Upwork or something.

Go outside the comfort zone of what you usually do to prospect. That way, you’ll be able to try some strategies that you haven’t done so in the past. And when you bring in new opportunities from different platforms, you’ll notice that sometimes these prospects have a particular way of doing things. For instance, if you go to LinkedIn, you are targeting people who do B2B, owners of companies, CEO’s, and other high-paying clients.

Create an Online Presence

If you think that your prospects will not Google or Bing you, you are wrong! I hire a lot of freelancers for various project, and the first thing that I do is to Google them. I look at their reviews on whatever platform I met them on. If I didn’t meet them on a platform, and then I’ll Google their name and look at their LinkedIn profile.

If your presence is nothing less than stellar, then I shouldn’t be working with you. Your prospects will probably feel the same. They’re specifically looking for bad stuff. So, make sure you have a fabulous online presence with exceptional client feedback.

Maximize Your Sales

The more you can help a client, the more they will pay you. Identify problems upfront even before the prospect knows about it. Instead of just saying, I can help you write this blog, for example, if you’re a freelance writer, you can say, “ I can help you format this blog, I can help you code it for HTML, I can have you published and distributed.” Maybe, the actual price for the writing of the blog itself might be $30 per four. But formatting and coding at HTML might be $60 an hour. That’s a skill set, where you just doubled your hourly rate by providing another service to your client.

Even though it’s good to have one core service that gets a client, cross-selling or up-selling your skill will allow you to charge more per hour.

I hope these tips will help you earn more for what you do as a freelancer. Don’t be afraid to double your hourly rate because you deserve it. For more tips, be sure to join us for freelancing school at freelancermasterclass.com.

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People come to me and ask how they can double their hourly rate. This inquiry is what I will be discussing in this blog. I don’t know if what you charge right now is right or not, but if you wish to double your freelancing rate, continue reading. People come to me and ask how they can double their hourly rate. This inquiry is what I will be discussing in this blog. I don’t know if what you charge right now is right or not, but if you wish to double your freelancing rate, continue reading. Increasing your hourly rate has nothing to … How to Double Your Freelancing Hourly Rate Read More » Mike Volkin clean 8:28
What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-issues-do-you-face-in-freelancing/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 16:48:38 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2937 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-issues-do-you-face-in-freelancing/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-issues-do-you-face-in-freelancing/feed/ 0 What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin Yeah, welcome to another episode of Freelancer masterclass. Today we’re going to be discussing what …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-issues-do-you-face-in-freelancing/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing?</span> Read More »</a></p> What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin Yeah, welcome to another episode of Freelancer masterclass. Today we’re going to be discussing what issues do you face in freelancing? What are those main issues and I talked to a lot of freelancers, as you can imagine, all day and I will tell you the most common ones and then give you some tips on how to overcome those issues. The first main issue is that there are so many freelancers out there, how are you going to separate yourself from, quote, unquote, the herd? How are you going to be different than all the other writers out there? How are you going to be different than all the other marketers or designers out there? You know, there are major categories Which you can work in freelancing as I just named a few marketing and designing and writing. But how are you going to be different than those millions or hundreds of thousands of people within your category competing for the same business? Well, the first thing you have to do is you have to really niche down into who exactly you want to target in terms of an industry. And then what type of person you’re going after. This is called branding. It’s part of your branding package. So if you’re a writer that’s targeting, let’s say the health care industry, you want to have a brand, a website, all your texts that you’re using to exude your brand to be geared towards not only the healthcare industry, but the type of work you’ll be doing for them. Will you be doing? sticking with writing? Will you be doing copywriting for them? Will you be doing technical manuals? Will you be doing website communications, social media updates, what type of writing Do you specialize in? So the Being able to niche on a niche or even niche on a sub niche is important because it helps narrow down who your audience is, and also helps narrow down who you’re competing against.

So separating yourself from the herd is one

issue that a lot of freelancers face, and another one is getting the pay that you deserve. I see so many freelancers trying to compete and pay. And as soon as you get somebody on the phone, they ask you for your rate, you start stumbling, like Oh, man, I, I normally charge 50. But for you, I would do 40 an hour, you know, it’s like stop doing that. Getting the pay you deserve. Number One has to do with feeling confident in the value that you provide your client. And number two, it’s understanding that hourly rate isn’t really accurate in terms of the value of what the client gets. I tell this to clients all the time when they asked me my hourly rate. The first thing I say is, you know, hourly rate really doesn’t matter because you can hire someone else to do the same exact project and they could take three times as long as me to do it. So how do you justify an hour earlier? Right, plus the work quality might not be as good.

So what I like to do

is I like to to get a good clear scope of work and just bid out on that scope of work. And whatever time it takes me to do is is doesn’t really matter because there’s already a price is determined for completing that scope of work. But if you do charge hourly, and I understand some of you will want to for various reasons, maybe your industry or your niche requires you to, you have to understand that the pay that you deserve is the pay that you feel that you bring value to the client. To get that pay. You have to be confident in your hourly rate. Be sure to set an hourly rate where you know you will deliver great results. Don’t worry about if somebody overseas is charging $5 an hour or less or even half your rate.

It all really comes

down to the conversation you’re having with that prospect and how to deal with that discovery call and how to overcome objections, you know, really the first Step in minimizing that negotiation process between, you know, can you come down and another $10 an hour an hourly rate, you won’t have to deal with that. If you’re on the phone with the client or meeting the client in person, and you’re showing them the value that you can provide, the more value that you can show the less they’re going to care about your hourly rate because your prospect just wants this problem solved. Whatever problem you solve for them, whether it’s getting some writing done, or, or building out a marketing funnel or getting some marketing, collateral design, whatever the case, the more you can show that you’re the person that can do the job, the less you’re going to have to negotiate. So getting the pay that you deserve, whether it’s $5 an hour or $100 an hour all has to do with how you deal with minimizing the client’s problem and making sure that they can get a solution to their problem as fast as possible. So practice that. Practice overcoming any objections if you notice a pattern when you get clients on the phone or prospects on the phone That they asked you the same questions, just write those out and make sure you have a good clear answer

to those objections.

And another issue that I hear about a lot that freelancers face is getting anchor clients. Now they don’t refer to them as anchor clients, a lot of freelancers don’t even really know what an anchor client is. So let me tell you, an anchor client is someone that you can rely on, that’ll give you a 10 hours of work a week or more. an anchor client is someone who you can develop a long term relationship with. It’s tough in freelancing if you’re building a business, and you’re only getting one z, two z hourly projects here and there, because it’s hard to find a client, it’s actually many multiple times harder to find a new client than to keep an existing one. So you want to make sure you get some anchor clients. So make sure any online profile you have the website you have all exudes to long term work. You want to show the clients that you’re available for work and don’t say that if you really aren’t But if you’re looking for some anchor clients, make sure you update your websites and profiles to say that you’re available. Anchor clients are vital to the long term success of a freelancing career. Another common issue is getting a steady stream of clients. How do you get a steady stream of clients freelancing? It’s hard. And this all has to do with that first point I mentioned with branding. If you can brand yourself as someone who’s an expert in a particular niche or even a sub niche or even a sub niche of a niche,

then you will be well positioned

for longevity and freelancing. You just have to make sure to not give up too early.

This is what I tell my students

in Freelancer masterclass many freelancers many solopreneurs many consultants, they pick a lane they pick a niche and they start writing some content and then they don’t get any traction out of the first two or three pieces of college. And then they give up, you really have to stick with it. And I like to describe it as a rolling snowball downhill, you know, you’ll, It’ll take a while to form that initial snowball, and then rolling it downhill, you start to get a little bit of steam, the snowball will grow. And then it’ll start to grow on its own after keeps rolling downhill, right, and then you have this big snowball at the end. And really the last half, you didn’t have to do much because of all the work you did prior. It’s kind of the same way with with building content and building out your thought leadership in a particular niche. So stick with it for a little while. And the way you can do that is get a good content plan going and get a good networking plan going make sure you hit the certain amount of meetups in your area or networking events. And this is all has to go with planning and create a spreadsheet with a three month plan of everything you want to do and just stick with that spreadsheet and don’t give up too early. And the last point I’ll mention today in terms of issues that freelancers face, is taking control of your clients so you can work the hour that you want. We actually have an entire class on this on how to set standards with your your clients. It’s important when you’re setting the relationship, when you just signed an agreement with a client. In that initial call, you go over the scope of work. Part of that scope of work is expectations of communication.

Do not let your clients push you around, and they won’t

do this on purpose. It’s just the nature of their work. But many clients will expect responses on weekends On nights on evenings and if you respond immediately, you are giving into that you are becoming a slave to your phone, your laptop and work interruptions. Imagine having a client that expects a response in 10 minutes or they send question mark text to your phone. Where are you? Oh my gosh, I haven’t heard from you. That’s a terrible way to live. And it’s a terrible way to work. Okay, early in my career, I’ll admit I didn’t set those standards. So I gave clients my cell phone number and told That it was okay to text. And what’s the difference between a text and an email? I’ll tell you the main difference is that when you text somebody, you expect an immediate response. There are other terrible reasons why you should never text with a client. But that’s the main one. When a client text you and they don’t get an immediate response, something’s wrong, according to them. So do not get in the habit of texting with a client. Texting is not meant for a business relationship. Let me repeat that because if you get nothing out of this podcast episode,

it will be this.

Texting is not meant

for a business relationship. It just is not. You can’t log conversations. They expect responses fast. It’s difficult to find information on a text thread. Just don’t do it. So when you’re talking about taking control of your clients, the first rule is don’t text with them. The second one is when you’re setting expectations. Give them your office hours. Hey, after Five o’clock. I like to be with my family. I check out for the day, whatever the case, or after three o’clock or whatever hours you work, tell them your work hours. Tell them that hey, when you email me expect a response within one business day. business day is not a Saturday business day is not a Sunday. If you work on Saturdays and Sundays great, tell them what a business day is for you set those expectations. Okay, so I hope this

addressed some of the issues that you

might face in freelancing and how to mitigate that good luck. Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor... What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin Yeah, welcome to another episode of Freelancer masterclass. Today we’re going to be discussing what … What Issues Do You Face in Freelancing? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 10:52
What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late? https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-you-do-when-a-client-pays-late/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 16:48:14 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2935 https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-you-do-when-a-client-pays-late/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-you-do-when-a-client-pays-late/feed/ 0 What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin. What do you do when a client pays late? That is the subject …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/what-do-you-do-when-a-client-pays-late/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late?</span> Read More »</a></p> What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

What do you do when a client pays late? That is the subject of today’s podcast. I’ll tell you from experience. You’re going to experience this as a freelancer. Everyone experiences a late paying client or a client who doesn’t pay at all so I’m going to show you how to mitigate that. And actually, this question came in from Cora question which I’m very active on so follow me on Cora under Freelancer masterclass if you don’t already. The person asks as a freelance writer, what can you do about a publication that pays but always pays late after much chasing up and this is something that is very common, so This person obviously is a writer and works for someone has an anchor client probably that they’re referring to as a publication. And they always have trouble getting paid. So let me give you some advice you can translate this advice into your own own freelancing business. The first thing you should do is set standards from the very beginning. Okay? So you should tell them that payment is to be made on this date on that date. Now, the bigger the company, the less likely you are to demand payment, they probably have a payroll system in place already bookkeeper, CPA and CFO the whole bit. But if you can, if the company is small enough, you tell them when you like to get paid, and how often so weekly, monthly, end of the month, beginning of the month, 50% up front 50% you know, after you do the work, whatever you prefer. So what you have to do really is have a heart to heart talk with the person that is hiring you if it’s the same person who will be paying You, if it’s not then set a separate appointment for the person who will be paying you after you get higher. And you tell them that this is the way that you normally work and most of the time, they will respect that. But if you do not set those standards, it will not happen. And you can obviously do that a number of ways, nicely worded emails, but phone call is the best. And what I like to do after a phone call is follow up with an email to recap the conversation. You should always have an agreement in place. And in that agreement should be a paragraph or a sentence or two about late fees and yes, you need to exercise late fees for so many years. I had late fees but never really imposed them and now I do because you set expectations with the client early and you can if you like let one or two late fees pass but let them know that I am letting this late fee go but in the future, it will be imposed that not mean to say something like that I would expect that if I was paying somebody late in terms of expectations and other tip I should give you is sending invoices on time. If you send invoices even a day late, you are telling your client that it is okay to pay late because I’m sending invoices late, you’re subconsciously telling them that you have to be very strict with the date in which you send payment. If you have an agreement with that client, that your invoices will be sent on the 28th then you should put in your calendar. As a reminder to send an invoice on the 28th. What I like to do is I like to set all my invoices with all my clients to set on the same day, the last working day of the month and then I block off half a day just to do invoices for all my clients and that’s my half day right there. That way I’m never late, it’s scheduled and it’s all done in one bulk sequence. Okay, so those are some quick tips with how to get a client to pay on time and setting expectations early. Enjoy

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor... What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin. What do you do when a client pays late? That is the subject … What Do You Do When a Client Pays Late? Read More » Mike Volkin clean 4:20
How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile? https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-someone-with-no-experience-create-an-attractive-freelancing-profile/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 16:47:43 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2933 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-someone-with-no-experience-create-an-attractive-freelancing-profile/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-someone-with-no-experience-create-an-attractive-freelancing-profile/feed/ 0 How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin. Are you new to freelancing? So how can you with little …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-can-someone-with-no-experience-create-an-attractive-freelancing-profile/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile?</span> Read More »</a></p> How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile?


Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin.

Are you new to freelancing? So how can you with little to no experience create an attractive freelancing profile that is the subject to today’s podcast. If you are new to freelancing and need something to build your portfolio, there are steps you can take to make yourself look as good as possible to a prospect without having a long history of successful completed projects. The first thing that you should do is have a very well written profile, many times a well written profile and by profile I mean on Upwork Guru com or freelancer, a well written profile exudes the work you’ll be delivering. So if you have a profile filled with spelling errors and spacing issues and grammar issues, then the client subconsciously expects that to be your work output. So write something well written it with effective sentences. And if you’re not a good writer, hey, go to Upwork hire a writer, make sure that it’s well written. And another tip if you have no experiences to get a niche, you know if you have no experience and you just label yourself as a designer, that doesn’t tell the prospect too much. Are you a designer for print marketing? Are you designer for digital? Are you specific to a certain industry? Do you do only social media? designs like what exactly do you design? So the more you niche down, the more you’re going to be talking to prospects language, if they’re looking for designer for social media posts, and you say that you are a designer for social media posts that automatically puts you at A positive without them even knowing what experience you have yet. And another tip would be talk directly to them, not so much about yourself. So when you’re writing your profile, it’s not about I did this I did that that look at me Look at, look at what I did. It’s about addressing their issues. So you’re referring to problems, pain points that they specifically have, and you’re addressing them. So you’re talking directly to them. That’s really important because that’s probably I would say the number one or number two issue I see with a lot of Freelancer profiles. I read on Upwork. And they all talked about I this I that, go through your profile and find out how many times you have the word I in your profile. If it’s more than two or three, it’s just too much. Okay. You want to think about who am I trying to attract here what specific client and what are their pain points. When you write down the top three or five pain points? You want to answer those pain points. sure that your solution in those profile again, this is all stuff you could do with zero experience in the industry because if you understand what their pain points are, you’re speaking their language and they’re more likely going to hire you, regardless of your experience. Another tip, get experience. You know, there’s lots of ways to get experience. I’ve had freelancers work for free or nearly free for me just to gain experience. I don’t mind doing that.

Ask other freelancers, if they need work done, work for free or nearly free just so you can get something on your profile and be upfront and honest with them say, Listen, I’m only offering this because I’m looking to build up my profile. So if you’re a designer, sticking with our design example, if you’re a designer, and you can go hit up a few marketers on up work and say, Hey, listen, I can do work for free or nearly free for you. This isn’t my typical rate. But I’m just trying to get experience doing this type of design work and I see your work in the social media. IZ, you’re a social media marketer, and I’m a social media designer. And you know, what that actually does is that builds relationships as well, I had someone a couple years ago approached me with the same approach. And now I still use them on occasion when I have a specific client that has that need for that particular designer. So as long as you’re upfront with them and say, This isn’t my normal rate, I’m just looking to add something to my portfolio. That would be something that you can definitely do to build strategic partnerships as well. And you can do this as an experienced marketer just to build strategic partnerships. I said marketer, bottom and freelancer, if you’re a freelancer looking to get more partnerships with marketers go to them and say, Listen, this isn’t typical. This isn’t my normal hourly rate. But I would like to donate 10 hours to help you with a client in this industry, because I’m looking to get more experience in this industry to build my own. My own profile, I’ll take you up on that offer, hack email me, you know, and I don’t know of any reasonable Freelancer that would deny that except for the fact that They’re so busy and have no desire to bring on someone new if they have, you know, a well oiled machine and they already have somebody that does all that work, then they pay somebody a salary like that would be a reason not to do that. Go out there and create those strategic partnerships, you know might be worth it in the short and the long term run. So those are some great tips on how you with little or no experience can create an attractive freelance profile and not have prospects dwell on the fact that you have little to no experience.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass calm to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile? Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies, hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor Mike Volkin. Are you new to freelancing? So how can you with little … How Can Someone with No Experience Create an Attractive Freelancing Profile? Read More » Mike Volkin 5:51
How to Write an Upwork Proposal that Gets Attention https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-write-an-upwork-proposal-that-gets-attention/ Mon, 01 Jul 2019 16:46:51 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2931 https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-write-an-upwork-proposal-that-gets-attention/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-write-an-upwork-proposal-that-gets-attention/feed/ 0 As a freelancer and someone who hires freelancers, I see all the good and bad sides the industry. From my experience, I can tell you that a good proposal can triple your income or even more. In today’s blog, we are going to talk about how to write an Upwork proposal that gets attention. For …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/how-to-write-an-upwork-proposal-that-gets-attention/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">How to Write an Upwork Proposal that Gets Attention</span> Read More »</a></p> As a freelancer and someone who hires freelancers, I see all the good and bad sides the industry. From my experience, I can tell you that a good proposal can triple your income or even more. In today’s blog, we are going to talk about how to write an Upwork proposal that gets attention.

For so many years that I have been working as a freelancer, I’ve spent a lot of time B testing various proposals. What do I mean by B testing proposals? Well, I’ll have a proposal ready and I’ll make a slight variation. And then I’ll spend a week sending one version and take another week forwarding a different version. I’ll compare the conversion rates to see which proposal is more effective.

I know a lot of freelancers who send a bunch of proposals and wait to get a response. If your one of them, you will not get many conversions this way. For me, the most effective way to present your proposal is through a live chat via Skype video with screen share, and record it with loom.com. And granted, there’s going to be times where a client wants to see the proposal in advance, especially if it’s a bigger project. But you should make all efforts to try to meet on Skype and discuss the proposal in person.

This method instantly lets you shut down any objections they have. Sometimes, objections are unfounded and incorrect. If you had the chance to talk to missed clients why they chose other freelancers over you, 80% of them would probably say reasons that are not correct. They might say that your rate was too expensive, but then they didn’t look through the whole proposal. They failed to realize that the scope was bigger than what the other freelancer can deliver and that they’re going to need to pay another freelancer to finish the job. In essence, your proposal was cheaper. Or maybe they misread delivery days or something. The only way to overcome any objection from your prospects is to present your proposals live through a video call.

My next tip is to monitor the proposals you send. Create a prospect folder where you can log-in the name of the company, whether you receive a response or not, the date when you submitted the proposal, the date you signed the contract, and other relevant information. By doing this step, you can track the progress of your proposal systematically. It will also give you an idea of what’s the best thing to do in your next bids.

But how are you going to write the proposal itself? In writing an effective proposal, I always use the acronym N-B-A-T. The first step is to understand what does the client Need and what type of freelancer is he looking for. That’s important because if you don’t know what he’s looking for, you will not understand how to market yourself. You need to determine where your skill can fit in to help the client do his business efficiently.

Look into the client’s Budget. You can take an estimated guess, but ultimately, you want to get the budget that they have. As a freelancer, you need to price yourself depending on what the client project entails for you to do. Most prospects don’t know how to do the job that they are posting that’s why they are hiring. At the same time, they don’t have any idea what is the right budget for the project.

To determine how much you can charge, look into the project details. Example, if the prospect asks you to do one part of a marketing strategy for $500, you can give the prospect a breakdown of how far the budget will go. So, if they have a budget, you have to tell them what you can do within that budget. If you think that the budget is not enough, explain to them why. Remember that they rely on you on what needs to be done, and how much each task cost.

The next step is to build your Authority. Ask the person you’re talking with if he is the decision maker, the one that can sign off on the agreement. If you are not talking to the person who can sign the contract, you are essentially wasting your time.

You need to remember that the larger the company you’re talking to, the more likely you’re going to get a mid-level manager or somebody who won’t sign off on the contract. That’s fine because if it’s a big contract, you might have to go through a couple of layers first. But as a freelancer, you’re more likely going to be working with smaller or even mid-sized companies; you need to talk to one who actually can sign off on the agreement.If they are not the decision-maker, you should get the basics, cut the call short and send in a detailed proposal to the person that is going to be signing the agreement.

The last one in my NBAT strategy is Timing. Ask your prospects what their schedule for the project is. If they want it done right away, you need to charge them more. You can timeline your proposal to let them know what you can deliver on a specific schedule.

Within your proposal, you have to consider three I’s: Issue, Impact, and Importance. At a glance, here are what these three I represent:
Issue: What is their big issue? Do they have lead generation problems? Is their existing writer not proficient with creative writing? What are they hiring you for?
Impact: What the value is of this project? If this project is not completed, how will it affect the business? How can your expertise create a positive impact on the completion of the project?
Importance: Is this important to their job performance or their review? Is this important for the company revenue or the bottom line?

Making a great proposal is your passport to success as a freelancer. I know that the competition is fierce because I experience it myself. But if you are confident about your expertise and you know how to bring them to the table, you have a bigger chance to make it big in the freelancing industry.

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As a freelancer and someone who hires freelancers, I see all the good and bad sides the industry. From my experience, I can tell you that a good proposal can triple your income or even more. In today’s blog, As a freelancer and someone who hires freelancers, I see all the good and bad sides the industry. From my experience, I can tell you that a good proposal can triple your income or even more. In today’s blog, we are going to talk about how to write an Upwork proposal that gets attention. For … How to Write an Upwork Proposal that Gets Attention Read More » Mike Volkin 12:25
Top 3 common freelancer myths https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-common-freelancer-myths/ Thu, 27 Jun 2019 15:14:50 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2925 https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-common-freelancer-myths/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-common-freelancer-myths/feed/ 0 Top 3 common freelancer myths ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone. Alright, Freelancer myths are the topic of today’s podcast. I hear a lot of myths out there …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/top-3-common-freelancer-myths/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">Top 3 common freelancer myths</span> Read More »</a></p> Top 3 common freelancer myths
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Raw Transcript

Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone.

Alright, Freelancer myths are the topic of today’s podcast. I hear a lot of myths out there and I’ve picked the top three that I think I should present you with. So you know, that is in fact a myth and not a fact. The first myth that I hear is, I can build a career on one z two z clients in a perfect example that is a freelancer saying they can make a full time career on fiber, fiber com. That is an extremely difficult way to create a career, at least a career with a lifestyle that you would want. One z two z clients or clients that have One or two hours of work for you, and you may or may never not see them again, it’s okay to do an hour free as kind of like a lead magnet to get them in the door to trust you. You know I have my thoughts on that, you know plus and minuses both ways. But to do that as a career to take on clients that only have one or two hours to give you. That’s a really tough way to make a living. What you want to do is you want to have an anchored client or two those are ones that will give you 10 hours of work or week ones that will consume about 25% of your time and give you long term work. So that is a myth No, no building career on Wednesday, Tuesday clients hasn’t been done Yes. Should it be done now?

Very tough way to make a living.

Another myth is I can have one service. And you know, I’ve seen so many people say you know, pick a niche, pick a sub niche and then that’s the only thing I’m going to do is, is that one exact job. Well, that’s okay to market yourself that way, but you should want You have clients be able to cross and upsell your clients with a diverse portfolio of what you offer. So you may be bringing in clients saying that you’re a designer working with only trade show booths, but then when you do good work for them, you can also say that you do web graphics or social media graphics or whatnot, you really need to get some more skill sets that complement your main skill set nicely. Okay. Another myth I want to tell you about is one that I just recently heard a freelancer saying I don’t need to prospect

my plate is full right now

I’ll prospect when it’s not full. So this person’s thinking and it’s very common is hey, I have more work than I can handle right now. I’m working 40 plus hours a week. Why should I prospect? Well, as you may or may not know, if you’re a beginner freelancer, you probably won’t know this. freelancing is cyclical. There are seasons there are times of the year where it’s slower than normal depends on what niche you’re in.

But you do need a prospect

at all times, even if you can’t take on work. Now, if you have a client that wants to sign with you, you can be straight up front saying I’m full right now, I can start your project on this date, a week, a month, whatever. But as long as you keep that pipeline full, and you can have them keep coming in. And you know, it’s kind of odd how you get clients, sometimes I’ll be talking to a prospect and this has happened probably a half a dozen times in my career. I’ll talk to a prospect that didn’t work out. Like I didn’t close the job and close them as a client. But they referred me to somebody later on like, as much as two years later, I’ve gotten referral and I really think back on Oh, that person referred you I had to look back at some notes. I had to scan my email for the name of that person cuz I had no idea who it was. And wow, why would that person be talking to me? So you never know getting somebody on the phone? What opportunities might come of it? So always be prospecting and use that aggregated listening technique we talked about in Freelancer masterclass in That way you always have prospects or opportunities come into your door or coming into your inbox rather, there’s a better way to say it. And then you can always get on a discovery call with somebody. And who knows, you never know in the freelancing industry clients could get, you can drop a client or clients can drop you faster than you could send an email. So you never really know what’s going to happen. It’s always good to have three or four even more waiting in the back. So always be prospecting at all times. Okay, so that’s a quick little podcast

of three common myths I hear good luck.

Thank you for joining us for freelancing school. Be sure to subscribe and get the latest updates on the show. Go to freelancing masterclass.com to become a master freelancer.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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Top 3 common freelancer myths ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. Top 3 common freelancer myths ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Raw Transcript Get ready for freelancing strategies hacks and tactics to help you skyrocket your success brought to you by Freelancer masterclass calm. You’re listening to freelancing school with your instructor microphone. Alright, Freelancer myths are the topic of today’s podcast. I hear a lot of myths out there … Top 3 common freelancer myths Read More » Mike Volkin 1 2 clean 4:51
The Best Websites to Get Freelance Jobs https://freelancermasterclass.com/the-best-websites-getting-freelance-jobs/ Tue, 25 Jun 2019 16:40:55 +0000 https://freelancermasterclass.com/?p=2905 https://freelancermasterclass.com/the-best-websites-getting-freelance-jobs/#respond https://freelancermasterclass.com/the-best-websites-getting-freelance-jobs/feed/ 0 A lot of you are familiar with the big freelancing websites like Upwork, Freelancer, and Guru.com, but that only takes you so far. Honestly, there are so many websites out there where you can get an anchor client. An anchor client is somebody who can consistently give you work at least 10 hours a week. …<p class="read-more"> <a class="" href="https://freelancermasterclass.com/the-best-websites-getting-freelance-jobs/"> <span class="screen-reader-text">The Best Websites to Get Freelance Jobs</span> Read More »</a></p> A lot of you are familiar with the big freelancing websites like Upwork, Freelancer, and Guru.com, but that only takes you so far. Honestly, there are so many websites out there where you can get an anchor client. An anchor client is somebody who can consistently give you work at least 10 hours a week. In this blog, we will cover the best websites to get freelance jobs.

Before anything else, I want to refer you to an excellent blog post called the “72 Best Freelance Jobs Websites to Get Remote Freelance Work (Fast)” by Ryan Robinson. Ryan is a freelance writer who has a website where he teaches people how to blog. If you want to become a successful blogger like him, check out his website at www.ryrob.com. This site has listed many different job categories of websites, from general freelancing jobs to developer jobs to design jobs, marketing jobs and more.

Other useful websites for finding a job include flexjobs. Flexjobs is great. It’s very well-curated, and there are a lot of useful filters to narrow down the job that’s right for you. Most companies that are on flex jobs are looking for freelancers to work for ten or more hours a week.

I tried another website called Solid Gigs. This website has dozens of jobs available daily, and once you’re a member, you will be notified of the top 1% of positions available daily. This method will save you time from hunting the best job that can enjoy working. Solid Gigs also offers expert advice in the freelancing industry by publishing blogs related to correct pitching, finding your niche, networking, pricing your talent, and other helpful tips.

The third website that I want you to visit is called Cloud Peeps. Cloud Peeps is relatively new to the scene, but they’ve been making some significant strides. When I first joined them, I was one of the first people to join. They didn’t have much going on. But now they do. If you want to do an upgraded package, they have a lot of paid features exclusively available for their premium members. But they also have a free version, which will allow you to test the waters first.

Also, consider Indeed.com. I will give you a tip when searching for jobs on this site. To make job hunting more manageable, on the search bar, you can do what is called a Boolean phrase. Boolean phrase search is when you can use dashes or quotes to do whatever you want with your search results. Example, when you type a dash before a word, it means you would subtract that word from the search results. If you put a phrase inside a quotation mark, your search would only look for the exact words inside the quotes. What you want to do with Indeed.com is set up an alert with some Boolean phrases that will allude to only remote jobs, you can type in remote, freelance or any of those keywords that have to do with finding remote jobs.

You can also check out Service Scape, a medium-sized company that’s making some good headway as well. I haven’t tried it yet, but it’s a top-rated site where some freelancers I know where able to find gigs. You might want to try it as well. Then, there is a little-known website called Craigslist. You can go right into Craigslist, there’s a gig section, search for gigs or there’s a job section as well. You can filter your options to telecommute jobs only to show you the freelance jobs available.

Aside from the websites I mentioned here, I hope that you can find more places to get your first client and grow your freelancing career. But the sites I included here have excellent lists of available jobs to get you started. I hope this helps. If you need to know more about how to become a master freelancer, join me in my freelancing school, freelancermasterclass.com, to get the latest news and tips.

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A lot of you are familiar with the big freelancing websites like Upwork, Freelancer, and Guru.com, but that only takes you so far. Honestly, there are so many websites out there where you can get an anchor client. A lot of you are familiar with the big freelancing websites like Upwork, Freelancer, and Guru.com, but that only takes you so far. Honestly, there are so many websites out there where you can get an anchor client. An anchor client is somebody who can consistently give you work at least 10 hours a week. … The Best Websites to Get Freelance Jobs Read More » Mike Volkin 5:40